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Guiness Brewery (Dublin)

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St. James's Gate, Dublin 8.

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      05.01.2010 19:21
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      The best brewery tour in dublin

      The best museum/brewery Ive ever been to and is an experience in itself. I went to dublin for 3 days with my husband and we adored it, the guiness brewery however had to the the highlight of our trip. Only a short bus journey away from the city, although the best way to get there is by the discovery bus which leads you to various focal points in the city and you can get on and off, so this will take you there as well as show you the other fantastic sightseeing tourist attractions. The brewery has many interactive things to do and is a story all the way round but done in a informative and fun way of the making of guiness. You can have your photo taken and then emailed to you which is lovely and something we received a few days after we got back, which was nice and there is a fabulous water feature which looks really magical. The walk round is really rather long and is wonderful throughout and at the beginning you are given a token of which you can get a free guiness with at the end of the tour and this had to be the highlight of the brewery not just for the guiness but for the exquisite and simply remarkable views. The brewery pub at the top is a 360 degree panoramic view of dublin, all through windows you can see right around the city and sit and enjoy a nice pint of guiness or with blackcurrent if you desire. Its fabulous and there is no other pub I have ever been to quite like it. A fabulous attraction to visit whilst in dublin and will take up only a morning or afternoon so combine it with another attraction most suited with the jameson whiskey which is also very good.

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      16.06.2009 10:07
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      A well worth while tour. Glad I went.

      Last weekend I went on a stag do to Dublin and while there we took a trip to the Guinness factory and we had a great time. I had been once before and was more than happy to go back again. Once there you see everything from the history of Guinness, all their different advertising campaigns and of course how Guinness is brewed. There is a brief talk at the start of the tour which is pretty interesting and then you are given a map and allowed to walk round at your own pace. There is lots of interesting facts to read on the way round and lots of photo opportunities. Your entry price also includes a pint of Guinness which you can choose to get at the skytop bar of to have a go at pulling your own which you then can drink. Me and my friend all opted for pulling our own which was quite a laugh. To add to what was already a good trip the woman who helped with the self poring took a like to our group and would tell anyone who didn't want their pint after they had a go at pulling it to give it to us as she knew we would appreciate it, which we did :o) The Guinness you get at the factory is the best Guinness you will ever taste. We were in the Guinness factory about 4 hours but I must admit we would probably only have been 3 if we weren't getting the extra drinks. Cost of entry is 15 Euros for adults and 11 Euros for students which I think is pretty reasonable when you think this includes a pint of Guinness which in Dublin temple bar area costs around 6 Euros anyway plus you can get a couple more tasters on the way round. A taxi to the factory from Dublin costs about 12 Euros with 4 in the cab. This is a trip that is well worth taking.

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      29.05.2009 23:13
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      Fantastic tourist attraction - beautiful pint of Guinness

      The Guinness Storehouse is located in St James Gate, Dublin. We walked there from the centre of Dublin and it took about twenty minutes. It is easy to find. Once we arrived we quickly got to the ticket desks, there was hardly any queue at all which surprised us greatly. We got student tickets without any hassle even though we did not have international student cards, they were very accommodating. We did the self tour where you walk round yourself with a guide book. I think this is the best way to see it as you can do it at your own pace. It was fascinating seeing how Guinness is made and I found the video about how they make the barrels extremely informative and I would definitely recommend watching it. I would also recommend that you pour your own pint as you get to pour a pint of guinness and then you get a certificate to say that you can pour the perfect pint and it is a great souvenir of your visit. I think the Guinness shop is a bit expensive but that is to be expected. I would advise buying souvenirs in the many shops around Dublin as they sell all the same stuff as the Storehouse.

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      11.03.2009 09:06
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      A must see when visiting Dublin

      My review of Dublin airport outlined my nightmare travel incident as part of a recent trip to Dublin. As part of the trip to Dublin my boyfriend and I visited the Guinness Storehouse and had a fantastic time. **Location** The Guinness Storehouse is located in St James Gate Dublin. It's a 20-minute walk from the heart of Dublin City Centre. Alternatively you can get the bus, which takes 10 minutes. My boyfriend and I decided to walk... and then it started to snow. Despite the blizzard and Artic like conditions we were able to find the place as it is signposted all of the way from the City Centre. **Price** Admission price per adult is 15 euros. Included in the admission price is: Entrance ticket Storehouse guide map Complimentary pint of Guinness in the Gravity Bar Car Parking It does seem reasonably expensive but you will spend a minimum of two hours inside looking around. **History** In 1759, at the age of 34, Arthur Guinness signed a 9000-year lease for the St. James's Gate Brewery, Dublin, at an annual rent of £45. The Storehouse focuses on the History of Guinness and how it has evolved into a global brand. What I found really interesting was finding out how the Guinness brand has established and grown since it was set up in 1759 . What amazed me was the global sales and brewing of Guinness in countries that you would not expect. I visited Tanzania last year and was amazed at the poverty and how basic the standards of living were. . Learning that actual Guinness was brewed in Tanzania rather than exported was quite a novelty to me and I just couldn't believe that Guinness is brewed, sold and bought in a country which many people have to walk miles for drinking water!! **The Storehouse** The Storehouse itself is quite modern despite being in the middle of the St James Brewery site. The Storehouse itself is a former fermentation plant on the site and is constructed to be in the shape of a pint. The visitors centre is very touristy, and shiny for being in such an old building and does have a modern and light feel rather than a crumbly old stuffy museum type building and is set over seven floors. Ground Floor The ground floor is where you are introduced to the four ingredients found in Guinness- water, barley, hops and yeast. The water section is excellent and there is a huge water feature demonstrating what goes on in the brewing process, which you can get up close to. There is also a large gift shop on this floor selling various branded souvenirs. First Floor The virtual master brewer guides you step by step through the Brewing Process. Up to 100 visitors each week will be able to Start the Brew themselves by operating a computer that is scheduled on the same timetable as the brew house. On the same floor, you will find a state of the art Tasting Laboratory. In the tasting Laboratory you get a sample of Guinness. Both my boyfriend and I thought that it didn't taste as nice as the Guinness served in the Gravity Bar on Seventh Floor. You will also find the Transport Exhibit, the Craft of the Cooper, and tales about Guinness abroad. Second Floor This floor includes the history of Guinness Advertising and all the associated branded memorabilia from over the years. The various TV ads are shown on screens too. Fifth Floor The Source Bar is an artistically designed bar. Beside this, the Brewery Bar is an informal and relaxing place to dine while at the Guinness Storehouse. Enjoy traditional Irish cuisine with traditional Irish recipes that use Guinness as a defining ingredient Third Floor This is an interactive exhibit which lets you look at your own drinking habits and promotes the dangers of binge drinking. This floor is quite empty and not so interesting as previous exhibits on lower floors. Fourth Floor There is exhibits on this floor which shows the history of the Storehouse building from 1904 to when it was made into a visitor attraction in 2000. Fifth Floor The Source Bar and the Brewery Bar are located on this floor. You can find traditional Irish cuisine using Guinness or go for a drink. Seventh Floor- Gravity Bar This is where you will receive your complimentary pint of GUINNESS. Panoramic views across Dublin. Really nice place to sit and chill with a pint of Guinness (or a soft drink). The views are brilliant. Unfortunately when we visited there was a huge snow storm which limited the views due to near blizzard conditions. However when the weather cleared up a bit we still had fantastic views. On a clear day this would be even better. **Overall** I'm not usually a fan of brewery tours; however I found the Guinness Storehouse to be an excellent attraction to go and see. I like the fact that although there are a number of talks going on this is not a guided tour so you can go at your own pace. The history of the place is brilliant and despite this being a building built over a hundred years ago the place has a very modern feel yet I don't feel this affects the authenticity and historical feel. The fifth and third floor do seem slightly sparse in comparison to the other floors in terms of exhibits hence the reason for my 4 star rating. Even if you don't like Guinness the Gravity Bar is a must for the sights over Dublin. A definite must see attraction if you are visiting Dublin.

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        02.02.2009 10:35
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        Strongly recommended -don't go to Dublin without going here

        The Guiness Storehouse (as it is known) is one of Dublins premier tourist attractions. A former brewery and part of the huge St James' Gate complex it sits on the west side of the City, production here stopped in the 1980's and the storehouse was reopened as a museum in time for the Millenium celebrations. We travelled to the museum by tram and found the five minute walk from the tram stop easy if slightly confusing (there is a sign, then no sign etc). We were warned there are usually queues to get the the museum but were behind only around ten other visitors. Entry costs 15 euros which feels steep, but discounts can be gained by investing in a Dublin Pass which is 33 euros and gives you entry to many attractions, or by booking online which allows you a 10% discount as well as a queue jumper. On entry to the museum you are greeted by a member of Guiness staff who explains the tour is self guided. You are given a map and a ticket which can be exchanged for oyur free print of Guiness in the Gravity Bar at the top of the building. The building itself is seven stories with a central glass atrium designed by the architects during the renovation to be in the shape of a Guiness glass. On the first floor you see the ingredients of Guiness, with the smells of each ingredient pumped into the area so you can experience the making of the iconic beer. The water display is spectatcular with a waterfall fountain and plenty of information about the origin of the magic ingredient in Guiness. The next floor shows you the process, with a chance to taste the toasted malt and read about Arther Guiness' special way of brewing.The next floor is the tasting lab which tells the story of the master brewers of Guiness and the modern scientists and technologists who now work at Guiness. You also get a chance to taste the beer here. Upper floors are devoted to advertising (a real highlight is a chance to view the iconic TV ads through the decades), the storage and transport of Guiness through the ages. The Choice Zone explains how to cure a hangover, shows you what happens to your body when you drink and other interesting facts. One floor was closed as an exhibition on 250 years of Guiness was bieng prepared which was a shame. But the story of the building itself which is explained around the central staircase is fascinating. A small exhibition to the artist who designed the classic Toucan adverts is also available on the upper floors as well as a bar and restaurant serving Guiness related emals. There is also a coffee bar for refreshments and well located toilets on each floor. The top floor is the Guiness Gravity Bar which serves your complimentary pint (or soft drinks if desired - but please, get a grip!) and provides almost 360 views of Dubloin with landmarks pointed out and literary quotes on the glass. The bar has a lovely atmosphere with everyone holidaymakers enjoying their drink. The building itself is stunning, and the design of the museum could not be more complementary with old and new sitting together in harmony. Lots of the old brewing equipment has been adjusted to embed modern flatscreens within it to show images and the interactive points are really fun - especially the one where you get to take a photo of yourself and send it to your friends. There is the obligatory gift shop with plenty of overpriced merchandise to buy as a souvenir. This museum was fantastic and more then exceeded my expectations, the 15 euros was well worth it and it more than made our trip to Dublin all the more special.

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          18.01.2009 21:05
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          We all love Guinness!

          The Guinness factory is about a ten minute walk from the centre of Dublin (or half an hour if your as bad at reading a map as we are!) Once you arrive you are met by the overpowering brewery smell. The staff are friendly and the prices are reasonable, you can also get student discount. The factory is more like a museum than a factory, and good if you want to know the nit nats and history of guiness, but we found it a bit boring. You get a free pint of guinness - which can be traded in at the top in a tower really high up, with glass windows all the way round, and you can see the whole of Dublin from them. It is pretty busy though so you have to wait if you want a seat! You can also pour your own pint, they teach you how to pour a pint of guiness perfectly, and you get a certificate for doing so. It's worth going just for the free pint.

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            02.11.2005 19:22
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            Must do trip in Dublin, but dont expect too much

            When i embarked on my trip to Dublin, I think both myself, and my fellow male companions (no remarks there please) were in no doubt that a trip to the birth place of Guiness was on the cards. Prior to Dublin, i had only ever had one pint of Guiness in my life. About a week before my trip, i had one simply to see if i could handle it, as I assumed i would be drinking alot. It turned out, i couldn't. Infact you might have said it was absolutely disgusting. We all agreed on this point. Nevertheless, i still wanted to go to the brewery, just because...well you know..to say I'd been. The price was around €14, but i remember i got in for about €8 because I had a student discount card. When you enter, you enter a huge 6 story building, made mostly out of glass. You can stand in the atrium and look all the way to the top, with various escalators and lifts on either side. The ticket you get, is not a piece of paper, but a plastic 'glob' in which there is a hollow compartment, in which floats a 'drop of the black stuff'. Yes. You get your own drop of guiness to take home with you. As you go in, you are treated to various displays of all the ingredients, machinery, and demonstrations of the processes by which Guiness is brewed. The tour is self guided, you follow the arrows and work your way up the floors to the top of the building. To be fair, most of this is pretty boring. Although i hear it has been recently refurbished, there are very funky lighting effects and a very old meets new feel to the deco' inside. I liked this, and it did compensate for the lack of content. To explain, the tour is actually more of a museum than a tour of the brewery. So if you were expecting to see the stuff being brewed before your eyes, prepare to be dissapointed. I know I was. However, all is not lost, as once you make it to the top of the building, you are in for a treat. Something which is worth the money alone. After going up the final glass elavator, you enter the top floor. Its not much of a floor, but a pod. A completely circular room, with floor to ceiling glass walls. From here you can see all of Dublin. With the sea to the East and the Mountains to the West, it really is an awesome spectacle. And to top it off, whilst up there you get your complementary free pint of Guiness to enjoy while you take in the view. Now, as i noted, up until now, i didnt really rate Guiness. But like i say, this was up until now. It is true, it really does taste better over there. This one pint blew my mind, and i realised, this was what the fuss was about. This was what Guiness was meant to taste like, and this was why over 120 million pints were sold a day (or something like that, obviously i didnt learn that much from the tour). I can quite believe that people say that it is the greatest pint they have ever had. Maybe its just because of the experience, maybe its because you are sitting right on top of where its all made, or maybe its because it really is one helluva drink, and the only reason it tasted so bad before is that we cant put that Irish charm into every drop of it. There definately is something in the water. Overall, the museum bit was a drag, and the gift shop was slightly expensive, but for the view, the general experience of being there, and the nicest pint of Guiness you will ever have, is definately worth the wait. Good things definately did come on that day.

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              15.02.2004 23:18
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              I read about the Guinness Storehouse on Ciao about two years ago, and decided it would have to be on my list of attractions to visit on my next visit to Dublin; the thought of a complimentary pint of Guinness after browsing through seven floors of attractions of liquid black gold artefacts, being just to tempting to refuse. The museum is open seven days a week, with the exception of Xmas Eve ? Boxing Day and Good Friday. During the summer the Storehouse is open until 9pm at night, although for the rest of the year, the Storehouse closes at 5pm. Opening time is from 930am each day. The Storehouse itself is based at the Guinness Factory on the banks of the Liffey. You can reach it by strolling up the banks of the Liffey, which will likely take about 30-45 minutes depending on the length of your stride. Alternatively the Storehouse is on the Dublin Tour Bus route. The Dublin Tour Bus normally costs 12 Euros, however the very nice driver did take us back into town afterwards for 2.50 Euro per head each. Entry to the Storehouse costs 13 Euros per person for full entry tickets, with discounts for children (5 Euros) and for older students (9 Euros). You can also buy a family ticket for 30 Euros. You can book on line at www.guinnessstorehouse.com. We just showed up and were able to gain entry without any difficulty, although a January visit is not the height of the tourist season and it may be advisable to book ahead in the summer months. Guinness has been brewed at this site for nearly 250 years, and the current Storehouse building was completed exactly 100 years ago in the style of the Chicago School of Architecture. This building used to house the fermentation process in making Guinness, and evidence of the old pipes, and original factory walls are still in abundance as you walk around the exhibition. However the exhibition has been modernised and the core of the building is a giant Glass Pint which stretches from the ground floor, ri ght up through the building and out into the skyline, which is the seventh floor of the exhibition and houses the 360 degree panoramic Gravity Bar. The displays are delightfully simple to browse around and great effects are created with one line quotes and key words which are transmitted onto various walls all over the Storehouse. The tour begins on the Ground floor behind reception, and here you will learn all about the four main ingredients which make up a pint of Guinness, namely Water, Barley, Hops and Yeast. Contrary to popular opinion, the water used in the process is not water from the Liffey! In the factory it is known as liquor, emphasising the emphasis that Guinness places on this key ingredient. It is noisy at this level, and you can sense the Craic of the workers and it feels like you might have stepped back in time somewhat. The tour leads you up a spiral staircase to the next main exhibitions on the first floor. There is also lift access, although I did feel that using the lift would slightly disrupt the natural flow of viewing the various exhibitions. The next stage is to understand the brewing process, although like all fine food and drinks, there is that little bit of know how, of tacit knowledge in the process that we will never understand. Also on this floor you will see an exhibition of the transport that was used to ship Guinness across Ireland and eventually around the world. Guinness had their own boats for this purpose. They also had a narrow gauge railway around the factory, which was able to guide trains around extremely tight corners in the factory grounds. We also gain insight into the trade of a Cooperage, and there is an exhibit of old casks stacked up, which can only make you reflect of the scenes at the turn of the last century when 250000 old wooden casks were stacked up and were a wonder of Dublin. Nowadays these have been replaced by Stainless Steel. We also learn about the sales and the growth in sales of Guinness abroad and a clock counts up each day from 0 to 10,000,000 representing the number of pints of Guinness that are produced every day, and consumed around the world. The second floor was fascinating for me as it takes you through a tour of the advertising activity through the years. This display is a mixture of interactive video screens taking you through all the TV adverts from the 50?s to the present day, and interspersed with this we see displays of all the different types of bottles and cans and other promotional items that Guinness has produced over the years. It also solved the mystery for me of how the Guinness Book of Records came about in the 1950?s ? I was never 100% sure if it had anything to do with Guinness or not! The third floor houses a learning centre which is used by Guinness employees and also the business community at large, and the fourth is also an extension of the Learning Centre with the addition of how Guinness has impacted on Ireland life. From here it is advisable to make your way to the seventh floor and to the Gravity bar to sample the finest pint of Guinness you will probably taste. Guinness was generally regarded as a good employer, and the talk among women was to try and find a Guinness Man, as the pension scheme was very attractive compared with other employers at the time. The Gravity Bar is purely a complimentary Bar, and you are provided with a ticket at the ticket desk, which you present in exchange for a Pint of Guinness, Extra Cold Guinness or a soft drink. Well ?The Sun was over the Yard Arm? you know (if only just?.) The setting is fantastic as you have a 360 degree view of Dublin. My only criticism is that there was very few chairs, and so people tended to sit on the floor beside the window to admire the view and drink a toast to Arthur Guinness. The bar is a very modern setting and is extremely friendly, with staff engaging the whole crowd in singing Happy Birthday for a staff member a t the time we arrived. Going back to the 5th floor you will arrive at a bar where you can buy more Guinness if you so choose, and there is also a restaurant which had attractive menu options, although we elected not to eat here as it was quite empty at the time and we decided to head back into Dublin for lunch. There are adequate toilet facilities throughout the storehouse, and are well signposted from the appropriate floors. The final attractions you might want to consider are the Guinness Archives, which are situated on a Mezzanine Floor and the Shop, which is a good size and sells an excellent range of branded sportswear, and other articles. I was impressed with the Storehouse, and definitely recommend you visit if you get the opportunity and if this kind of self guide tour is something you like doing. We felt the entry price represented good value for money, when you see the overall quality of the attractions, the length and the interest of the tour, and the free pint considering the price of a pint of Guinness in Dublin?s city centre these days!!!!! Cheers Arthur!

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                05.09.2002 01:19
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                Dublin = Guinness, Guinness= Dublin. You cant separate the two! You're surrounded everywhere you go by advertising, souvenirs and the fact that the brewery covers rather a large area of the city! So a visit to the Guinness Store House is almost obligatory, its rather an imposing building, part of the still working brewery which stills produces 10 million pints of the stuff EVERY DAY and its a massive 7 seven storeys high. Standing the reception its an awesome mix of brick, metal and glass, a see-through elevator goes right to the top and at quite an alarming speed! The entrance fee isn't too bad, 12 euros for an adult, 10 for students and OAPs and about 5 for kids. This gets you entry to the Storehouse, a lovely little pin in the shape of a pint with a cheery face and the most important thing, a ticket for a free pint of Guinness up in the bar or a soft drink. I was a bit let down that they now had paper tickets for the free drink rather than the transparent stone with the single drop on Guinness in it, but hey, technology moves on. Each floor is dedicated to something different, the ground floor shows the ingredients that go into Guinness, there is a fantastic waterfall that hides a display of hat goes into the it. There is also an exhibition showing the story of Arthur Guinness and the start of the brewery, this is done through huge TV screens drawings and original documents. Carrying on upstairs, we can see how the ingredients are blended, the brilliant thing is not only being able to see what the ingredients look like through the process but also smell them! You also get to see the vats and copper drums they were mixed in. Slightly less interesting is the cooperage where you get to watch videos of how barrels are made (Yawn!!!), the transport bit isn't brilliant, it could be developed a lot further. I never realised how popular Guinness is abroad, it goes to every continent, if not every country in the world, i ts also now brewed all over the world. Going up again this floor is dedicated to the advertising of Guinness, there are interactive viewing stations where you can replay adverts from all over the world dating back to the 50's. Theres also displays of Guinness glasses, bottles and other memorabilia. And of course there has to be a look at Guinness's other famous invention....the Guinness Book of Records. This came about from a discussion of which bird could fly the fastest! This is a very small display and could do with a lot of expanding. From then on it gets a bit boring, the 3rd floor is home to the learning centre and reception, here bar staff can learn to pull the perfect pint, and conferences and seminars are held here. Going up again you can 'Visit Guinness at Home', what exactly this means I'm not sure, it just seemed to be a wall where you stick cards saying how lovely Guinness is. Up to the 5th there is another exhibition gallery which was empty when we were there. There is also the bar and restaurant where you can try Guinness stew and other delicacies. Didn't appear to be too popular though. The we are up to the highlight of the place, this is the Gravity Bar where you change your voucher for a pint of Guinness. Walking into the bar is simply amazing, a round structure , all the walls are glass so you get a full view of Dublin. There are chairs and tables scattered around the room, the bar itself is right in the centre of the room so no view is blocked. And its such a relaxed chilled out area you could spend a couple of hours up there (On my sisters visit, she spent 5 hours up there!). Its a wonderful place to visit, most of it has wheelchair access but you'd be buggered if you got stuck there cos there wasn't an attendant in sight the whole time! Its very clean and presentable, especially the toilets (I've got a thing about clean toilets!), the staff are friendly and che erful. The shop is of course full of Guinness products and are quite reasonable. I would recommend the Storehouse for everyone, young children may get easily bored and taking a person with vertigo to the Gravity Bar is just plain cruel, but for most its an interesting few hours. And after going up to the Gravity Bar I discovered.......Guinness really does still taste as foul as I remember...the proper brewed stuff or not!

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                  17.11.2001 03:48
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                  A trip to Dublin would not be complete without a visit to the home of the Black Stuff – the Guinness brewery. So we headed off to the new Guinness Storehouse on the last Saturday in September to sample the Guinness experience (as well as the Guinness!). There has been a brewery on the site at St James’ Gate in Dublin since at least 1670 when it was owned by Giles Mee (a brewer who later became Dublin’s Lord Mayor). 21 years later it passed to his son-in-law, Mark Rainsford, who continued to brew ales and beers. Rainsford’s son leased the brewery in 1715 to John Paul Espinasse. In 1759, Arthur Guinness – the 34-year-old son of a land agent from County Kildare – signed his name to a 9000 year lease, paid for with a legacy he had inherited, and so the Guinness legend was born. The new Guinness Storehouse was only opened to the public in December 2000, after it was decided that the old Guinness Hopstore was having difficulty coping with the number of visitors. As many as 500,000 were visiting each year, although the store was originally designed to cope with only 70,000 per year. In 1996, architects were retained to convert the vacant fermentation plant at the St. James’ Gate Brewery into a world-class tourism venture – and they have succeeded. In just over 4 years they have completed the £30 million project and the new Storehouse opened in December 2000 with the capacity to cater for up to 1 million visitors each year. The experience starts when you enter a massive glass atrium and purchase your ticket to the experience. The ticket is unique in that it is a clear plastic pebble with a small globule of real Guinness inside it. Do not lose this – it is your ticket to a free glass of the black stuff at the end of the tour (more on this later), and can be kept as a unique memento of your visit. Off the central atrium is the Guinness Archive, where almost 250 years’ wor th of records relating to the brewery, the people who worked in it and the local area are stored. It is one of the few company archives that is open to the public and contains not just the history of Guinness, but the history of Dublin and the history of Ireland as well. Encased in the floor of the atrium is the original lease document signed by Arthur Guinness in 1759 – a fascinating memento of the founding of this great company. I felt it was a shame it was in the floor as many people rushed past in their haste to begin the tour. The tour is self-guided and starts when you walk into a dark space that is supposed to resemble a vat of swirling Guinness – the noise of rushing water from a 7 metre wide waterfall is deafening as you enter the ingredients section. Hops fly around inside a glass case and a huge tray of barley resembles a giant sandbox for you to scoop up or rake into patterns. Whilst arrows on the floor and wall guide you round the experience, you have to keep looking all around as there is information everywhere for you to read and absorb. The next section is a meeting with Arthur himself – an authentic Georgian room houses his desk and chair while audiotapes and pictures recount details of his dealings. This area seemed to be a haven for photographers as guests queued up to have their photograph taken in the great man’s chair. Moving on to a section devoted to the brewing process, there are old brewing artefacts and large tubes containing the barley at various stages in the brewing process until it becomes the final product. The ‘Cooperage’ section has video screens hidden in barrels where you can see old footage of coopers at work. This leads onto transportation and displays of the various methods used. The advertising section contains lots of memorabilia from past advertising campaigns, together with a hall of fame showing classic ads. The next f loors house a learning centre where bar staff from around the world can learn how to pour the perfect pint. There is also a large circular display structure where guests can fill in a card and leave a memento for others to read. Up to the next floor and the Brewery Bar where you can purchase lunch, although most people bypass this on the way up as they are keen to get to the Gravity Bar and the final part of the experience – a free pint of Guinness. The Gravity Bar is a circular structure offering a wonderful panoramic view over Dublin. (If, like me, you don’t like Guinness, soft drinks are available instead.) It is a bit of a crush in the bar as there are only 4 pumps for pulling pints so you will have to wait your turn. Throughout the tour every sense is stimulated, from the noise of the waterfall and the tapes of former workers recounting their experiences, to the sights on every available surface. You can touch everything from barley to machinery and smell the powerful aromas of hops and barley. And finally, the taste of the black stuff itself. Back down to the ground floor and the obligatory visit to the retail shop where you can peruse a vast array of branded merchandise. We arrived at the Storehouse at around 11am and walked straight in – by 12 o’clock people were queuing for the experience. Admission costs for adults were £9 (Irish Punts) each, although these are increasing to £9.50 from 1st December. Family, student, Senior citizen and child discounts are available – under 6’s enter for free. The Storehouse is open from 9.30am to 5pm all year round, except for Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Years Day and Good Friday when it is closed. Located at St. James’ Gate, it is easily accessible by bus (123 from O’Connell Street, 51B and 78A from Aston Quay). If you go on one of the hop-on, hop-off bus trips, they will stop right outside the gates and give you a money off voucher for entry. Free parking is also available at the site. There is wheelchair access to the store, as lifts are available on all floors. For more information and a virtual tour see the website at www.guinness.com. We thoroughly enjoyed our visit to the Storehouse – it is a fascinating experience on the history of a great product. You can spend as much or as little time in the different areas as you want to – there is no rush. Some people go round in an hour; others stay all day and take advantage of the food from the Brewery bar before continuing their tour. It is certainly somewhere I would recommend others to visit if in Dublin and if I am ever fortunate to go back to Dublin, I would probably visit again and I am sure I would see things that I had missed first time round. Cheers!!

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                    22.05.2001 06:06
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                    The Guinness hop store, synonymous with its location at St James's Gate, has been in operation since 1759 when Arthur Guinness purchased and renovated the 'Rainbow Brewery' and started to produce the porter that has since become renowned world-wide. The four storeys of the converted 19th century Hop Store house the World of Guinness exhibition, an audio-visual show on the history of Guinness in Ireland, an exhibition of Guinness advertising and a model Cooperage and Transport Museum. Tours of St James's Gate, although instructive on the process of brewing, are confined to areas outside the brewery proper. However, the atmosphere is recreated quite authentically in the visitors' centre with huge copper vats and pipes. Guinness is said to taste better closer to its source and the tour's highlight is indisputably the pint of porter, which awaits the visitor in the bar afterwards.

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                      20.03.2001 19:21
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                      Dublin was always top of my list to visit with the main attraction being the amount of Guiness freely available!The Guiness Hopstore did not let me down. After walking miles and miles to get there as a lack of money was featured strongly in my holiday i was thoroughly pleased with my destination and even my blisters were worth it. As well as the museum being very accurate, informative and intersting, Guides explained everything there is to know about the black drink. And, last but not least the pleasure cam to it's max when at the end a free pint of Guiness was given to 1 and all in a comfy traditional Irish pub setting. I'll defiinately be going back when i can!

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                      18.10.2000 02:17
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                      In the north of Dublin is the Guinness- Hope-Store, that's the museum of the Guinness Brewery. You go up in direction north to the Quay's and than you turn left and go along the Quay until a large factory, the Guinness Brewery. Then you must go left in the Thomas-Street and you can see the Guinness-Hope-store in the St. James Gate. On three floors you then can start your walk in the third floor incipiently, you also get a programme in your language. You can learn something about the development of the trademark Guinness first about historical and current development of the brewery and in the middle of the room you can get an experience of a cool beer . At the end of the third floor is a funny art gallery with old advertising posters. You turn out into the second floor where the events in the brewery at models are described in a very clear English . The second floor closed with a cinema demonstration about the history and the ascent of the brewery to a market leader world wide. Then you go downstairs to visit to the transport exhibition after this and you will test a pint of Guinness and you can buy a memory present in the ground floor. The lectures and presentations are in the great whole it in the right length arises no boredom and the pint of Guinness was inclusive. You receive a voucher for the Irish Music Hall of Fame for 1 Pound. If you liked to see Guinness, click on the following address: http://www.guinness.ie

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