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Lyme Park (Cheshire)

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NATIONAL TRUST / TUDOR HOUSE / PUBLIC GARDEN. Lyme Park, Disley, Stockport, Cheshire SK12 2NX. Tel: +44 (0)1663 762 023/766 492 Fax: +44 (0)1663 765 035 Email mlykfr@smtp.ntrust.org.uk OPEN: THE PARK: daily 8am-dusk THE GARDENS: daily 11am-5pm (April-Oct

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      09.06.2013 22:49
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      A magical place for all the family

      Just last week me and my partner took a visit to Lyme Park and we have loved it so much we have already been back twice! It is a brilliant park with so much to explore there just isn't enough time in one day, plus it is so amazing that you will just won't to keep coming back. Finding Lyme Park Lyme Park is based in Stockport, postcode SK12 2NX. Luckily for us we had a sat nav so found it very easily but it is well signposted from the centre of Stockport so I can imagine that no problems will be had when trying to find this little gem (If you haven't got the benefit of a sat nav). The drive to Lyme park is lovely you got through some stunning villages and I kept an eye out for the lovely pubs in case we wanted a drink or something to eat on the way home and there are plenty. Arriving/ Prices at Lyme Park When you arrive at Lyme Park there is a huge sign outside and you turn down a hill and follow this until you stop at a 'hut' where there is a list of prices (If you haven't already looked at these online). The price is £5 for a car which we found was reasonable but lucky for us I had a free national trust pass (which I get two of per year as a Natwest customer) we handed this to the lady and she then asked if any of us were under 26 I informed her I was and she went into detail about how I could get 12 months membership with the national trust for £22 per year and we would have unlimited entry all year round. I turned this offer down as I wasn't sure if we would be using it again. It is safe to say that we took them up on this offer the second time we went there, what a bargain - we have already made up £10 in visits (This is just in parking and viewing the park - not including the house and garden) already only two weeks into my 12 month membership! As Lyme Park is a National Trust site I would highly recommend looking at their memberships and seeing the great offers you can get. Once you're in Lyme Park The barriers were lifted and we drove through and up towards the parking area. The views driving through are lovely, field after field and woodland after woodland I was excited to go and explore! I could see the viewing tower and then we arrived at the car park. It as a sunny day so it was rather full but we still found a parking spot easily. We got out of the car, picnic stuff in hand and began walking up the path way in the right hand corner. It was brilliant, the walks went on for miles and miles, there was so much to see and just not enough time to see it all! Me and my partner love walking and exploring so this was perfect for us, after a couple of hours of walking and finding a lovely spot for our picnic we headed back towards the house, we reached the house walking through the huge front entrance gates and being amazed by the sheer size of the house and garden. What I hadn't realised is that we had only gone through the woodland, there were more gardens to explore! We went in when we were approached by a national trust volunteer (Very Helpful and really should be appreciated for the time they put into these places), she gave us lots of information and told us where we needed to go and that we need to attach our pass somewhere visable so they can see we were allowed entry. She pointed the reception out and off we went, the reception again has not only a list of prices but also of the National Trust Memberships, there are various volunteers and plenty of leaflets all around. We handed the lady serving us the free passes (from Natwest) and were handed back a Lyme Park pass which is Lovely may I add, I have kept mine for my scrapbook. Lyme Park House Once we had our passes we headed up to the house where we were given a guide book to take with us, once again the volunteers were so helpful. You are not allowed to take photos in the house and the volunteer informed us that some of the property inside is 'borrowed' but we didn't mind so much even though I love taking photos of everything! We wondered around this rather quickly, I just like to take all the amazing old rooms in; they are amazing and lucky for me my boyfriend is history teacher so we can talk between ourselves along the way. It really was worthwhile and I would recommend it to anyone and everyone. There is also a National Trust Volunteer in every room who are full of knowledge so any questions you can ask them and I am sure they will know the answer. There is also the opportunity to you to dress up as a Victorian (the costumes are amazing) and you can have your photo taken, we didn't do this ourselves as I didn't manage to persuade the other half but the people who did this looked amazing and it did look like a lot of fun from where I was standing. Lyme Park Gardens Once we had finished in the house we headed out to the gardens, I was blown away, they are absolutely beautiful without a question of a doubt and are very well looked after, different flowers everywhere, a reflection lake, a waterfall - for those who love to take photos like me this was just perfect! There is a giant greenhouse, plenty of walkways and best of all a deer park (By this point I was beyond impressed - I would have paid a fortune for this). About 1000 photos later we decided to head off home, we head spend around 8 hours here, walking the whole time and the excitement of it all had tired us both out! I would recommend Lyme Park to anyone and everyone, there is a child's play area, a pond where you can feed the ducks, a refreshment hut, a small café that sells food and so much to explore. Great for all ages and for all of the family! The opening times are all on their website and vary for each section of the park. A cheap price for everything you get if you ask me and the novelty does not where off - If I were you I would start arranging your trip there now it is one place I will never forget the beauty of and that I will keep going back to so I can explore more.

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        03.05.2010 18:48
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        Worth a visit

        We live about 10 minutes drive away from this wonderful park, but sometimes forget that its just on our doorstep. We decided to visit with our two year old daughter, for a day out of the house over the bank holiday weekend. We were really surprised how much we enjoyed the day, and will make more time to visit again soon. This National Trust park is in Cheshire, right on the edge of the peak district and the Derbyshire moor lands. Driving up the long winding driveway you get a sneak peak of all the well kept parkland estate, before seeing the famous country house on a hill in the distance (you may recognise the house from the film Pride and Prejudice). We parked in the busy gravel car park, which was well managed by car park attendants guiding us to an empty space. We arrived at about 11:00 am, but the car park was already becoming full, and new arrivals were being askd to park on the overflow car park. The cost of admission to the park was £3.50 per car. We decided to take a short walk down the side of a little lake to a small courtyard which included a plant/gift shop, a cafeteria with outside eating space and toilet facilities. We decided to get something to eat before we set off around the park, so my partner and I both opted for a pot of tea, with a scone, jam and cream, which was on offer for £3.50. We chose a kids meal deal for our little girl, which came in a colourful cardboard box, and contained a ham sandwich, an apple, a carton of apple juice and large chocolate cookie. This was priced at around £2, which she really enjoyed. The cafeteria also provides bottle and food warmers, but we are thankfully past that stage. We had to sit inside as there were no free tables outside, which was such a shame as the weather was so nice. Many people were opting to sit on rugs around the lake, but we were not that organised! After a bite to eat, we walked back past the car park, stopping to feed the ducks on the small lake the leftovers of our sandwich, and onto the childrens park. This is designed for children under 11, and comprised of a large adventure playground, with lots of slides, monkey bars, swing bridges etc, over a soft bark flooring. This was really busy with children, and not much seating space for the adults watching, so we decided to walk around to the second park for younger children. This was on a concrete flooring but had nice little swings, a small climbing fame and slide. This was perfect for my daughter, and not too busy, so she had fun running around whilst we sat down. When she became bored, we ventured a little further, to a third playground space, which was for slightly older children featuring bigger swings, a large swinging tyre-type attraction, and a large slide. My little girl loved the slide, but was getting pushed out of the way by the more enthusiastic older children, so we decided to venture up to the main house. We walked up the grassy stairway to Lyme Hall, this was a bit difficult with a buggy, and I don't think I could have managed it on my own! Once we reached the house and paid our entrance fee to the house and gardens (£9.00 for adults, £4.00 for children), we were instructed to leave the buggy in a locked store room. We ventured into the house and greeted by two lovely assistants who asked if my little girl wanted to take part in the childrens quiz/ trail, but we thought she may be a bit young and declined. The actual house was lovely, with many beautiful rooms and bedrooms to look around, not to mention the amazing tapestries hung around the house., and collection of clocks in the final room of the house. However, with a two year old, pulling at my hand, wanting to sit down on the floor, or trying to run off, I think it was too ambitious of us to think we could look round in peace without her getting bored. We finished our rushed tour, by stopping back in the courtyard, retrieving our buggy, and looking for the baby changing facilities. These were located next to the restaurant, but quite a long winding walk down into the depths of the mansion to find. Once there, i found one baby changing room, with no queue luckily, but it was clean and contained a baby change table as well as a toddler seat, which is handy. Next we opted for a short stroll around the lake. In front of the house. We were given a map of the large gardens, some of which is landscaped, some woodland and some rugged moor land. As we had the buggy, and it was a very hot day, we just walked around the flat Path around the lake, had a peep into the Victorian greenhouse with its exotic plants, and around the walled Italian gardens on the side of the house. We then headed back to the car, just stopping at the ice cream shop which is located on the edge of the car park. For 79p my little girl had a little homemade strawberry ice-cream in a tiny waffle cone, which was the perfect size for her little hands. After sitting on the grass beside the car, doing a bit of people watching. Lots of families having picnics, playing games, flying kites etc, we headed home. We will definitely be returning to the park. Even though the admission to the house and gardens was expensive, this was a lovely day out. Food and drink was reasonably priced, but we could have been cheaper if we had taken a picnic. The house and garden is open Feb-October, but the park is open all year round. We probably only explored about 5% of this vast park, and im sure we could have lots of different days out here, walking through the woodland, looking for deer! Having a go at the orienteering or family walk quizzes (maps can be bought from the national trust shop), or coming in the school holidays when they have craft marquees and childrens activities. The ground was a bit rough for pushing my buggy, but a three-wheeler would be able to tackle the terrain better, and I have since found out that baby slings and infant hip carriers are available for hire.

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        12.03.2010 13:11
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        Feel good day out

        Lyme Park - National Trust's L-shaped mansion house with garden and deer parkland is situated in Disley near Stockport in Cheshire (just off A6) and is a great full day out for history and nature lovers alike. House an garden are open 27-Feb - 31-Oct-10 and cost £9 for an adult, £4 for a child and £22 for whole family but the parkland is available all year and the only charge to pay then is 'estate entry', which although is £5, it includes car park and introductory CD to listen to on approach to the house from entrance booth. Estate courtyard is impressive with its gateway and statues on Neptune, Venus and Pan on giant Ionic columns. The interior of the house dating back to late 16th century is a bold mix of reneissance, rococo and elizabethian style rooms and artefacts with quite a lot to see and get inspired by. Attached to the house are: beautifully shaped dutch garden with a pond in the centre and flower beds guarding it, former mill pond with a stone bridge and rose garden south of orangery. Further, an extensive and varied parkland stretches including herds of sheep and white deer (you do get mistaken sometimes ha!), its main features: Cage exposed on a hilltop and Lantern hidden in thick wood - both nowadays listed buildings used for hunting back in the days. Even further away you can make your hike through a field on to a long ridge from which you can get impressive views of Stockport, Manchester and on other side Derbyshire - well worth the effort. For countryside and heritage admirers this is the trip to make! After long day 'on the estate' why not nip to nearby Crown Carvery (Dog & Partridge pub) for a big plate of feel-good carvery for only £3.59 Mon-Sat. Enjoy!

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          30.11.2001 16:53
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          Lyme Park, a National Trust managed property, is situated approximately 6 miles from Stockport, Cheshire. For five hundred and fifty years, Lyme Park was the countryseat of the Legh family. At first glance Lyme Park appears to be complete from the outside, when you get into the building you find that the interior betrays its age, and parts of the Elizabethan structure, which were built by Sir Piers VII can be seen. Once this has been ascertained, it is well worth taking a second look at the outside, for instance, the north front, which is the original entrance, still has the Renaissance portico with four tiers of columns following the classical orders in a non-conventional way. The house is originally of Tudor extraction, but has been transformed into an Italianate palace by the architect Leoni. The front has been altered on many occasions by a succession of Leghs to become the way it is seen today after Giacomo Leoni's substantial remodelling in the early eighteenth century. As you pass through into the courtyard, the heavy Palladian regularity of the stonework is impressive, but rather austere in the cold light of northern England. Fortunately, some of the Elizabethan interiors still survive, however, the contrast between these and later rooms is quite dramatic. Lyme Park provides an excellent opportunity to view Mortlake tapestries and woodcarvings by Grinling Gibbons. For those who are interested in clocks, there is an excellent collection of English examples. The Victorian gardens were of particular interest, especially the sunken parterre. There is also an Edwardian rose garden and what is described as “Jekyll-style” herbaceous borders, together with a reflection lake, an a ravine garden. The gardens are surrounded by a medieval Deer Park, which spans approximately 1,400 acres of moorland, woodland, and parkland and is considered to be one of its best features. The red deer which roam freely over the park are said to be descendants of the deer which roamed the land when it was first enclosed by Piers Legh I. Up until 1884 there were wild cattle with white coats and red ears as well, but despite attempts to cross-breed them, they died out. Now Highland cattle graze on the surrounding moorland. Lyme Park has been used for several television programmes, including ‘Pemberley’ in the BBC’s adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. As well as the gardens and house, Lyme also has several other attractions, which are worth a visit, including the Paddock Cottage, a hunting lodge that dates back to the 17th century and The Cage, an early 18th century hunting tower mentioned earlier, which was build to replace an earlier sixteenth century building which used to be on the site. The Cage was used for watching the hunt and for banquets. The Cage shown above stands on high ground to the north east of the hall and was built by 1737 to replace a possibly early sixteenth century building on the site. Currently under restoration, this was used for watching the hunt and for banquets. Today, it offers visitors wonderful views of the Cheshire Plain, the whole of Greater Manchester and as far as the foothills of Snowdonia.Another building in the park is the Lantern, which has a square base, an octagonal central section, and a pyramidal roof. This was built in 1729, possibly from old stone from the house. Opening Dates and Times =================== Lyme Park is open on Friday to Tuesday from 11:00 hours closing at 17:00 hours and Wednesday and Thursday from 13:00 hours closing at 17:00 hours – from the end March until the end October each year. It is also open on Saturday and Sunday, from 12:00 hours until 15:00 hours during November and December. Entrance Charge ============ Each attractions has a separate entrance fee and at the time of writin g, this was £5 for the house and gardens, both of which can be visited separately (£4 for the house and £2.50 for the gardens). A family ticket was also available at a cost of £12 or a combination family ticket was available at £15. Entrance in the park per car was £3.50. There is a children’s playground but it is only available to those who are aged 11 or under and the park provides good facilities for those who take their dogs. Location ====== The main entrance to the park is off the A6, six and a half miles southeast of Stockport, nine miles northwest of Buxton. The house and car park are approximately one mile from the entrance. Further Information ============== For further information on Lyme Park, please visit The National Trust site at: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/scripts/nthandbook.dll?ACTION=PROPERTY&PROPERT YID=114

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