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Pendle Hill (Lancashire)

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Pendle Hill, Lancashire, is the remains of a vast plateau (the delta of an ancient river) of sedimentary rocks which lie over an ancient limestone bed.

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      07.04.2010 21:59
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      A beautiful place and an enjoyable day for the whole family.

      This Easter Sunday the family and I went up Pendle Hill, it is a fantastic day out. It is something that not everyone could enjoy as there is no highlighted wheel chair access unlike some walks you can go on and you definitely can not take a pram up there!

      However Pendle Hill has a visitor centre and a few picnic benches with a small play ground to the side, so if you wanted to just admire the idyllic village you could without taking a walk up the hill. They also have a few other walks guided around the village which you may find more suitable, although I only did the Pendle hill walk so cannot comment how these are.

      Pendle Hill became famous because of the amount of witches, 13 in total from the area. They were also known for the amount of people they had killed through witchcraft. All 13 of the witches were tried and 10 of them had been hanged in Lancaster which is not far from Pendle.

      The village of barley green in which Pendle hill is in, is your typical old style village, with a bus operating every 2 hours, so I would suggest driving there as the buses are not reliable. I also found the area is not as well sign posted as I thought it would be, however the locals were nice and friendly and directed us in! There are a couple of pubs, a restaurant and quite a few B&B's should you wish to make it a longer stay.

      The walk however up Pendle hill is very well signposted and takes you along a little river, over a couple of bridges and then you start the climb of the hill, I did see a few fell runners so if you enjoy that kind of thing I would assume it would be a great run! The walk takes you right to the top of the hill and to the remains of a wall which was once a huge limestone tower where the witches lived.

      Apart from the history that goes with this hill, the views are great and should you walk along the guided path up the hill you can actually sit there as well and enjoy the scenery. For those who have children my 4 year old daughter managed fine and it roughly took us 1 hour and 30 mins to get to the top and back again and a nice leisurely pace. It is a great day out for everyone experience walker and non-experienced walkers such as me!

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        14.06.2009 12:38
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        Great day out.

        I recently walked up Pendle Hill after the tales of mystery and witchcraft had grabbed my partners attention. As we enjoy a bit of a ramble every now and again we thought we'd head on over and take a walk.

        I won't go into the history of Pendle and it's infamous hill as the other reviews have covered that better than I ever could, so I thought I'd just review the walk and the hill itself for any budding walkers out there.

        We started out in a village called Barley which is virtually at the foot of the hill, and parked in the car park just over the bridge opposite the village hall.

        Our journey took us past the two reservoirs near to Pendle Hill which meant we ascended via the less popular and thus less busy route, which is longer but the gradient is spread over a greater distance.

        The weather was beautiful on that particular day, which made the ascent all the more gruelling - it's not the highest hill by any stretch, but it's still a slog getting to the top, which ever path you take!

        Having said that, once we did reach the top of Pendle Hill, the views were stunning - infact the best views I've seen atop a hill since I went to Scotland.
        With the sky being so clear, we could see for miles and just sat admiring the scene for about 20 minutes before making our way back down.

        The descent took us on the more popular path, which is very steep but has a 'stone staircase' to lead you down. This part of the walk can put som estrain on your knees, so be prepared for it and take regular breaks if you need to - it's a busy path too so you'll have to dodge the other visitors who are using the path to go up.

        The total walk was around 5 miles, but it did feel like more by the time we'd finished to be honest (having said that we were a bit out of practice with hill walks!). If you're a novice walker, this will be quite challenging I would have thought, but certainly worth a go, especially if you get a clear day to enjoy the views. Even if you don't, you can still enjoy the mystery and folk tales that surround the area.

        The walk we followed is in the book 'walks in Lancashires Witch country' by Jack Keighley - well worth getting if you fancy walking the hill. Not only is the map easy to follow, but you also get some history of the area thrown in too!

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          27.05.2009 23:33
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          Nice easy hill, suitable for all walkers!

          When I look out of my window in the morning, I am greeted by the lovely sight of Pendle Hill. I have been up it many many times, and know it very well, so I thought, hey, why not share my experiences!

          Pendle Hills is located in the north-east of Lancashire, England, near the towns of Burnley, Nelson, Colne, Clitheroe and Padiham. Whilst this is no huge mountain it is still 557 metres (1,827 ft) above mean sea level. Which makes it a fair old pull!

          Pendle his is famous for the story of the Pendle witches, if you visit the nearby village of Sabden you can find out all about there history in the little gift shops and quaint cafe's. There are also a few nice pubs in Sabden.

          The hill itself has a large summit plateo, which goes on for a few miles. There are some awesome views from the top, on a clear day you can see Blackpool tower and the peasure Beach. In the other direction you can see the hills of the Yorkshire Dales, most noticeable are the famous 3 peaks, Inglebrough, Wernside and Penegent, all visible on a clear day.

          There are several ways up pendle, if your after a quick walk to the summit, I would recommend the way up the steps. This route sets of from the side of the road just a mile or so outside of barley. There is a well marked footpath and you quickly gain height to reach the summit. This walk is only a few miles and not to tricky at all.

          Another nice way is the road that rises swiftly out of Sabden, this road known as 'nick of pendle' takes you high over the shoulder of the hill and down the other side. There are plenty of places to park up there are its a nice easy walk to the summit without having to gain to much elevation. would say this walk is probably about 5 miles, but is still a very easy one.

          If you do take the above route I recomment popping into the Well Springs Spanish & Mexican Resteraunt. This is on the way down toward Clitheroe. If you just want a quick pint it has a nice balcony where you can sit out and admire the view. Or if you fancy a meal the food is excellent. They often do a 2-1 deal on a Sunday night, but check this before you go!!

          Overall would say Pendle hill has something for everyone. Some really nice walks, it is surrounded by history, with some very picturesk little villages in the area, plenty of nice pubs, and a real good friendly lancashire atmosphere.

          If your in the area, go have a look. You won't be disapointed. And if you do make it to the top, jump around and wave for a while, maybe I will spot you from my window!

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            14.04.2001 18:12
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            Pendle Hill (1827 ft / 557 m) [Background: Although not strictly an attraction in Clitheroe itself, Pendle Hill is located in the town's immediate vicinity (about three miles to the East). It has a very interesting history as well as being popular with walkers.] Surrounded by several smaller villages, in addition to the market town of Clitheroe with its historic castle, Pendle Hill dominates the East Lancashire landscape. Quaint settlements, all with their unique character, such as Whalley, Sabden, Newchurch, Barley, Downham, Trawden, Padiham, Fence, Higham, Barrowford, Gisburn and Chatburn have all developed in the shadow of this great hill. Pendle is not an archetypal hill, as it varies in length from one mile to three miles in places. It has a very steep slope to the North-East, with much shallower slopes to the South-East. Literally speaking, Pendle Hill is a nonsense as the word Pendle is derived from the Welsh word 'Pen' meaning Hill (so in actual fact its literal meaning is 'Hill Hill!') Long ago (around 7,000 years ago in fact), Pendle Hill was used as a Bronze age burial ground, and a burial mound can still be seen at the top, but it is events from about 400 years ago that make for more interesting reading. The modern fascination with Pendle Hill is due in the most part to its association with witches. Eleven so-called witches were executed in this area in the early 17th century. Names such as Alizon Device, Demdike and Alice Nutter became infamous throughout the land for their alleged activities. Thankfully justice in the area is meted out by much fairer means these days! The annual ascent to the summit of Pendle at Halloween still takes place to this day, and is certainly a sight to behold. Even the most ardent non-believers in the events of the past will still get a shiver down their spine. The area is also particularly popular with walkers around Easter time as
            well. From the summit of Pendle Hill it is possible to oversee the Forest of Bowland, the Yorkshire Dales and also the Lake District on a rare clear day. Serious walkers can follow the Pendle Way, a 45 mile round trip around the hill, which also takes you to its summit. Thankfully, several shorter walks have also been devised for those who are not quite up to this mammoth trek. For those CAMRA fanatics out there, Pendle Hill is also the inspiration for Pendle Witches brew, which is produced by Moorhouses brewery in nearby Burnley. I can definitely recommend this area of the country. Aside from Pendle Hill itself there is plenty for visitors to do and see in the surrounding area, as well as several places to stay. In addition there are many good restaurants and pubs from which to choose. Nearby Howarth on the other side of the Lancashire / Yorkshire border probably attracts a higher number of visitors, but Pendle has much more to offer than first meets the eye. Sadly, like many areas at the moment, the Foot and Mouth restrictions have curtailed many activities. Pendle Hill has also suffered, with the annual Easter climb having to be cancelled. Hopefully the situation will have improved for Halloween. However, despite these short term problems this area of the country has much to offer and is perfect for a relaxing countryside break for those who want to get away from the hustle and bustle of busy towns and cities. Other resources: ----------------- www.pendletourism.com www.pendlewitches.co.uk {An original Dooyoo opinion © Blackjane 2001}

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