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      07.08.2013 11:36
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      A Museum about the sea

      Having small children and being from Yorkshire myself, I have been aware of The Deep since it opened in 2002, but with it being located at Sammy's point in Hull (which is approximately 60 miles from my house located in South Yorkshire) we have never got round to going.

      My eldest son has been studying sealife in his year one curriculum and had a very enjoyable trip to the Sealife centre at Scarborough on a school trip, so I thought I would surprise him with a trip to The Deep in the summer holidays.

      I opted to convert some of my Tesco clubcard vouchers to cover the entrance cost to the attraction, so cost to myself was limited then to petrol and a packed lunch and ice cream.


      ==Getting to The Deep==

      We drove over from Rotherham via the motorways. We tried to use the postcode given on the website in our satnav. We noticed before we set off that there are two postcodes on the website provided. One of those was specifically for our Tom Tom satnav. However, neither postcode was right, but my husband could pin point the location on a map and manually add it to our device.

      Once we got into Hull, there were fairly decent brown tourist information sign posts along the roadside directing us where to go.

      First impressions of the site were that the building looked really impressive, but smaller than I imagined it to be. It was also mentally busy. By the time we got there it was 11:30ish which is well after the 10am opening time, but there were so many people there we were directed into an overflow car park by people in yellow high vis jackets. They were getting people parked very efficiently, but it was clear it was a very popular attraction. There is apparently space for 280 vehicles, and I would say on the day of our visit, it was hitting that capacity easily as the main car park plus a couple of overflow car parks were full.

      Parking is not free at the venue. You need to pay a cost of £3 in a pay and display machine, which covers 6 hours of parking. This is more than ample for the time you will spend on site.


      ==The grand entrance==

      Going into the building, there are two entrances - a main entrance, and one for disabled guests who get to queue jump a bit. When we arrived, the queue was massive. It stretched a good way along the front of the building. On the bright side, there were 3 or 4 people at the kiosk, and another member of staff working her way up the queue to give out gift aid forms for people to fill in as they waited.

      Apparently you can buy tickets on the website before your visit, but there does not seem to be much advantage in doing so as the people behind us had done this, and there was no short cut in queueing for them for having done so like other attractions we have visited.

      Cost of entry for a family of four would be £35. There is a 10% discount for booking online, but I don't think we could have done this anyway with tesco vouchers. We had £40 worth of vouchers, and I was expecting to lose £5 of vouchers. The woman at the desk asked me if I wanted to buy a guide book or two, and when we opted for one at £3 she then asked if we would donate the remaining £2 for the penguins that they are hoping to get. We were happy with this arrangement.

      We were given the option of having a plus day pass - this means you fill out a form and add photos to it, and you can return when you want over the next year. I was pleased with this as a lot of places don't allow you to do this when paying with clubcard vouchers.

      Opening hours are 10am to 6pm, with last entry at 5pm. It seemed that the queue was just as big as we were leaving, so we have decided on any subsequent visits to head over later for an afternoon visit.


      ==An adventure into the Deep unknown==

      We were given a credit card sized entry ticket with a bar code. We wandered up to the barrier to get in to the actual exhibit after a visit to the facilities and admiring the collage art work on the walls. A man scanned our ticket and we picked up a sheet of questions for the kids to answer as they walked round the exhibit.

      Straight away, there are a couple of display tanks with fish in. The museum is set up so that you are constantly walking in a downwards direction past any exhibits. We started off looking at skeletons of sea creatures, and there were a couple of interactive games on computer screens that the kids could have a look at. Straight away, we could tell how busy it was as everyone seemed shoe horned in and it was hard to stick together as a family due to the sheer volume of people. While out with young children this is not the best scenario as you want to stop and look at exhibits with them. We found it quite stressful as my youngest has a tendency to want to wander on as soon as he has took in what he can and my eldest likes to linger and try to read displays. It was too busy to accomodate both safely.

      Carrying on past here, the claustrophobic feeling was not eased when we reached an area that had a large open top tank. There was a talk being given by a lady with a microphone about some of the fish in the tank and some of the activities going on. I think this made it even busier as people lingered in one place while they listened to what she was saying.

      We made a beeline for an area that was designed for children. There was a wall with peepholes where they could look at and touch various nautical themed items such as seaweed and shells.

      There was also an area of the floor that looked like a small rock type pool. It was quite novel because as children jumped on the floor, it looked like the water rippled. I'm not sure how they did this but it was very interesting for the kids. If we had stayed in this area, they were about to do a session where children could touch some sea creatures but we didn't hang around to see what this was all about.

      We carried on down more ramps where we moved onto looking at other tanks with rays in. My eldest son liked this best as he had seen rays on his school trip and he could tell us what he knew. There was also a section here devoted to the science of slime in sea creatures. Here there was a lot of information about slime and the children got to see their favourite fish, the clown fish (Nemo) hiding in anemone.

      My youngest sons favourite activity was here too. There was an exhibit that depicted a sandy shore with rocks on. There is a tank filled with water, and some limpets, and when you tilt the table, you can press a button to make the limpets attach to the rock. This was a clever use of magnets that kept us amused for a little while.
      Other exhibits looked at different aquatic environments such as really icy waters, and amazonian waters. It was interesting seeing different creatures in different environments.

      There was a special activity for designing a badge as a souvenir. Both children did this. They were given a picture to colour in, then a member of staff used a machine to make this into a badge. This was a low cost activity with a minimum donation of 50p - money again going to the penguins.

      We carried on right to the ground floor Here there was a little childrens play area. This was a soft play type activity which was really for babies. Our kids wanted to go in but they were too tall. I would say this didn't stop other parents letting their kids in though, and personally, I wouldn't have let my baby in there either as the bigger kids were jumping about and it would have been dangerous.

      Around the soft play there were lots of activities for the slightly bigger kids. Most of these were interactive games such as one that was a research station and you had to make decisions when scenarios came onto the screen to keep the research station operational. Things like oxygen tanks running low, food supplies running low, water running out. My children both really enjoyed being in control on these games.

      From here, we had pretty much seen all there was to see. The big tank runs the whole way through the building. We walked along looking at this, and we took the stairs back up to the top of the building rather than getting in the mental queue for the lift. We enjoyed looking at the different types of creature who swam at the different depths, but I have to say that although it was big, it was not anywhere near as big or dramatic as I was expecting. Apparently a bit later in the day, divers would have been going into the tank and cleaning it.
      Other days they go in to feed the sharks - I guess this would have been quite exciting for everyone to watch.


      ==The final fish platter==

      Overall, we covered the whole exhibit in just short of two hours. We could have lingered a bit longer, but both kids were getting fidgetty, and I don't blame them as I was too. It was a good exhibit, but it was just far too busy to enjoy fully. I felt a bit like we were cattle being forced through a small gap. Nothing was making you go faster, but it was just too busy to linger and look at anything at length. It was noisy, and there were a group of older kids on some sort of trip running round annoying me, and I was just feeling a bit cooped up, so I can't imagine how that must have felt for a kid.

      We didn't really want to use any of the facilities on site like the gift shop or the cafe, so we went outside and sat at the picnic tables and had our lunch that we had taken with us.

      I reflected on our visit as we ate lunch. I wondered if it was just us who had completed the exhibit at that speed, but we noticed other groups that had been queueing near us were also leaving the venue.
      At a cost of £35, if I had paid cold hard cash, I would have felt a bit let down at spending so much and not getting more value from it. Yes, we can go back, but at a round trip of over 100 miles, its not something we are going to do regularly. I've paid the same at other venues and the kids have been entertained all day.

      Don't get me wrong, I do think that it is a good exhibit, and I do like that it was a museum rather than just another sealife centre, but I just don't think there was enough there to fully engage kids and it was over capacity in my opinion to enjoy it and linger.


      ==The aftermath==

      Following our lunch, we found ourselves having a stroll around the area around the centre. We found plenty to look at on our walk from an old dry dock, and some boats in the marina. We managed to fill another couple of hours wandering round to see what we could see and it was a pleasant day to do so. It would have been a different story on a wet miserable day. Apparently the Deep is located in the museum quarter, so if we go again, I will investigate what else we can do in the area to make it a better day out rather than a short visit.

      We enjoyed our day out, but I did feel a bit underwhelmed and like the day had not been as good as I had built it up to be. While I am glad I visited, we are more likely to revisit other attractions in our area that entertain our children better.

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        22.10.2012 17:46
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        Lots to see and do on a rainy day in Hull

        I went to The Deep at Hull with my boyfriend, his mum and his dad, we also had to take the guide dog as my boyfriends dad is partially blind, they were very accommodating considering stan is a big golden retriver but they were more than welcoming to him coming along. There are ample parking spaces at The Deep, with a whole line dedicated to disabled parking. There is a large statue outside the building which is of a shark, it totally sets you up for what is ahead.

        To get to the main display you have to go up in a lift to the top floor, where you can get a great view of the river Humber from the windows, you also get a great view of Hull and Lincolnshire across the river. Once you enter the display it is amazing, it has many windows where you can see a various array of different fish, jellyfish and creatures with shells. One of the tanks is a circular rounded tank up to the ceiling with jellyfish swimming all around, the lights in the tank make the jellyfish look a pink and purple colour. There are also many small displays which you can learn and play with whilst walking around, they are mostly aimed at children.

        There are many small tanks with smaller fish and creatures in, some of which I can remember are a big blue lobster and small worms which were coming out of holes in the ground, these two were the two most interesting things on display in the smaller tanks. Another small tank had a conga eel in, these fish scare me as they look horrible. It was slithering around the rocks and looks generally horrible but that is my own personal opinion.

        One exhibit looks like a giant paddling pool, or so it looks from one side, until you walk around the exhibit and you come face to face with a big wall of glass. The smaller end of this exhibit has a lot of smaller fish in, they are all multicoloured, with lots that look like nemo, yellows, blacks, purples, blues and reds. The other side has the more deep water fish in, they are huge, one of the stingrays has a span of about 5 metres or so, they also have a lot of sharks which are also very big, they swim around a lot more than the other fish.

        The Deep also has exhibits with smaller ants, spiders and frogs in, they are very interesting, it is a nice break seeing these animals as well as the fish and lobsters. These tanks make it harder to see these animals and insects as they are a lot smaller and camouflage themselves a lot better. The Deep also has attractions such as a winter attraction where there is a giant ice wall, where me and my boyfriend liked a bit of competition of who could hold their hand on the longest. The dog even started to lick it which was quite funny.

        The Deep also has a small cafe where you can buy snacks, crisps and drinks, they are very expensive and I would advise taking your own food if you want to make a day of it. The gift shop is located on the way out, it has a lot of profucts and has toys of most of the fish that are on display, there is also a huge tank in the gift shop with smaller fish swimming around.

        Overall this is a great day out with lots of fun things to see and do! The Deep has lots of interesting and different fish on lots of its displays. It is well worth the admission fee!

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          24.07.2012 21:37
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          great day out

          Travel and Parking

          Yesterday me, my partner and my niece decided we were going to go visit the deep. Armed with sweets, drinks, travel sickness pills and a raging hangover we set off from good old Grimsby to the deep located in Hull. On the way we had to cross the Humber bridge which now thankfully has been lowered to £1.50 each way. Once we were across the bridge there was brown travel signs on the roads constantly saying the deep with directions so luckily we never got lost (impossible with the thousands of signs) The deep is an award winning attraction in the UK which is home to over 3,500 creatures. When arriving at the deep building itself, it looks a little bit like a sinking ship, the car park goes around the front of the building and annoyingly you have to pay and display.

          Admission

          Once arriving we wasted no time going in and buying our tickets, we paid for two adults and one child which came to £29.50. We thought this was a pretty reasonable price considering the amount of time you can actually spend being at the deep. It is open 10am-6pm and the last entry is 5pm. We arrived about dinner time so we had nothing to rush around for. If you do miss the last entry there isn't anything else to do in the same area so you have to be there on time. They currently have an offer on, when you pay for and admission fee they give you a slip to fill out all your details on, this lets you have a years pass for free, that's 365 days of visiting the deep for free!

          Layout

          Since there is so much to see the deep has an efficient layout so you don't miss anything on the way around. After paying in you walk forward and here you will come to some lifts, you then go up which takes you to the cafe and the entrance to the animals. From here the deep path way that you stick to spirals down several floors at a nice pace and on this pathway are all the animals and little off sections that take you to and from this pathway to ensure you don't miss anything. Eventually when you get to the bottom of the deep there is something called a bubble elevator which will take you right back up to the cafe.

          Gigantic squids!

          The first thing we came to was walking through a room of fossils and gigantic sea creatures which used to occupy the sea, of course these weren't alive but it has lots of information and pictures and a real fossil wall of gigantic squids, sharks and even some smaller fossils in their simplistic forms. At the end we came to some jelly fish which I found fascinating, it's strange but you can spend at least half an hour just staring at these beautiful creatures and not never realise how long you've been stood staring at them. All down this area there is information on every animal shown with it's name and a little bit about them. There are also games to play in this section and quick ways for children to take in the information so it's easy for them to learn about the animals.

          we then arrived at a large pool of water this had many different species of fish including small sting rays and the dory fish from finding nemo and a lot of other fish too. The tank is clear glass and a lot of people including myself sat on the floor watching the fish happily swim by as we all tried to catch the best photo's of them. There is a staff member on a speaker talking about the animals present in that room and informing people that if they would like to rinse their hands under the sinks, they would be aloud to touch a starfish. Getting excited we all decided to have a go but because of the number of children I just let me niece have a go, she described it as slimy and rough, but squidgy at the same time.

          In hundreds of different sized tanks the fish come in lots of colours and from many backgrounds and corners of the oceans. The tanks didn't just contain, there was rare corals and other tanks with the most beautiful corals in which are fascinating to watch even though they don't do anything.

          The big fish

          Here we come to the large tank, this contains several types of large sharks including saw fish sharks(can't remember their real name) and catfish sharks along with others. This was the section that amazed me the most within the deep, just because it seemed to unreal to be this close to a real shark swimming around majestically. Large sting rays occupy this tank as well and it never occurred to me until now but they got on with each other really well. There are other larger fish in here too but because of my excited niece we never had chance to read much of the information or names of the creatures in most of the tanks.

          Creepy crawlies

          They don't just have fish in the deep but a lot of large snails, massive slugs, scorpions, spiders and the most strangest luminous coloured frogs which stood out in their tanks, but not until you actually noticed one of them when they jumped. Unfortunately they only animals in this place we didn't get to see was the slug and the scorpion, they must of buried themselves in their mud.

          Videos, games and.. a wall if ice?

          All around the centre are information games and quizzes to play which are easy to read and understand for people of all ages including children along with relevant games. we didn't get to check any of these out very much because Zazzy wanted to race round looking at the animals. Something really cool though is they have two walls made out of ice, touching it and pretending to lick it is what we spent the next 10 minutes doing when in this area. Not sure how they do it, but it's awesome.

          Bubble elevator

          You can spend a couple of hours going around the deep as there are 3,500 animals to see but when you've finished you come to what is called the bubble lift. This was one of the most amazing things in here, going in, the front on the lift is see-through and it actually takes you up the levels but through the shark tank and stops at each section for a minute so you can see them all swimming past you.

          Staff and cafe

          There isn't much staff around the place that we could see, the staff were located in the section where you can touch animals but apart from that the rest of the staff were present in the cafe, shop and entrance. However they had a great answer for every question and delivered excellent customer experience. In the cafe they sell hot meals, sandwiches, pastries, cakes and sweeties along with drinks. We stopped and had some chips which were ok. Not much you can say about chips really, the prices were fair for somewhere like this, not cheap but not ridiculous either.

          Gift shop

          This is somewhere I can easily avoid but we had no choice to go in, there was the usual tat every child wants to buy along with lots of cuddly animals which was silly cos most of them was of birds, penguins and turtles which none of these are even present in the deep, zara decided she wanted to buy a mermaid teddy which cost me £9.99. i wasn't very happy but she was.

          Toilets and access

          There is only one set of toilets which I could find and that was at the entrance, whether there is more than one set or not I don't know. This was ok though because we only used it once and that was on the way out. This centre is wheel chair friendly with next to no steps at all meaning everyone can enjoy being here.

          location and details

          Website:http://www.thedeep.co.uk/index.p​hp
          address:The Deep, Tower Street, Hull HU1 4DP
          telephone:01482 381000
          email:info@thedeep.co.uk
          Opening times: 10am-6pm
          adults: £10.50
          children:£8.50

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            08.08.2011 23:14
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            An average day out nothing to rave about

            MY husband, 4year old son and 18m old daughter and I visited 'The Deep' on Saturday. It was very busy perhaps owing to the fact the weather was as wet as the fish tanks. We were lucky to have a free child ticket with the two adults tickets so we only paid 19.90 and thats includes your plus pass that entitiles you to return anytime within a year for FREE. But expect to pay for parking £3 for upto 6 hours.

            The building its based in is very interesting, advertised as the only submarium so part is set under water. There is a lot of informatative displays with pictures and information about ancient sea creatures etc. As i mentioned in the headline i was a bit disappointed with the amount there was to see. This is perhaps owing to the fact i have been to a fantastic place before along the same lines. You walk through a great deal of displays without and real fish first before you get to the big tank which i believe they said is the 2nd largest they have. Its good in that you can see the fish from above the water or through the glass under the water. My kids loved the stingray fish type as they swim right upto the glass.

            The advertisement of sharks was very disappointing even my son kept asking wheres the sharks. We only saw one tiny shark and the rest to be honest other than the above mentioned tank had fairly boring fish nothing special.

            In addition to the fish and information displays there was a soft play area for under 8's and a discovery corner with activities. There is also a cafe which i couldnt comment on as we didnt eat there. The glass lift again was a bump for me as it was just sort of like is that it.

            Value for money it is good if you dont live too far away with the plus pass and the kids enjoyed it but for me there was something lacking i think more interesting fish and displays.

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              04.05.2010 00:21
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              Attraction in Hull

              wHen we recently rented a caravan in Scarborough, one of the suggested places to visit in the brochure was the Deep, which is in Hull. Little Miss is interested in all things to do with animals and given that she finds Sea Life Centre interesting, we decided that it was worth a visit.

              The Deep is an environmental and educational charity dedicated to understanding and protecting the oceans of the world, and the staff perform beach cleans and surveys for sharks and ray eggs.

              WHERE IS IT?
              Situated in the centre of Hull, we had about an hour drive and once we had set the sat nav, then we found it really easily; once close to the attraction it is signposted, but this always makes me chuckle because attractions are only ever sign posted once you have found them!

              FIRST IMPRESSIONS...
              When we read the information about the attraction, I noted that the design of the building is award winning, and indeed, when we saw it, it was very impressive, very big and very modern. I don't know if it's supposed to look like a ship but it does actually look like a very big ship which has gone aground and is half sunk into the earth.
              There are plenty of parking spaces costing £3 of which £2 is redeemable in the gift shop or on a guide book. So, the parking was very cheap and with our voucher, we bought a nicely designed and informative guide book for £1. At this stage, I was liking the place already as it didn't seem to be ripping off its visitors as so many places try to

              ONCE INSIDE...

              Although there were lots of visitors we moved quickly to the pay area and paid our money; once we had paid we were given identification cards which allowed us free entry for a year- all we have to do next time is show a photo and some id. Great stuff- the place gets better and better, and thrown into the price was an audio tour which himself commandeered but he did say it was good!

              The entrance area itself is all very modern and bright with dolphins floating from the ceiling- not quite where they should be but a good touch to give us a taste of things to come. The shop is also close to the entrance area but as ever Little Miss was told to wait until the end before we went to the shop. When we did visit th shop afterwards it was well stocked with the usual gifts and so purchases were made!

              Before going to the main fish area, we had to take the lift, conveniently located close to the ground floor (very clean ) toilets. With our audio tour in hand we took the lift upstairs and started our viewing of the 3,500 (plus) fish. That's a lot of fish!

              The Deep is divided into 10 zones:Visions of the Ocean; Tieline; lagoon of Light and coral Realm; discovery corner; endless Ocean; Slime/4D film; Northern Seas; the twilight Zone; Kingdom of Ice; Deep Blue 1- The future.

              Each zone focuses on a different area of fishy life, and for me some were more memorable and interesting than others. The first area was Visions of the Ocean and featured a few tamks which didn't really appeal to me. However, zone 2 was a lot more interesting- a timeline of the awakening seas. This area was quite dark and the hand rail shows a timeline with 1 1/2cm being a million years. To the sides of this hand rail and going down the ramp were lots of interesting interactive activities. We also enjoyed Zone 8, The Twilight Zone. Here we were plunged almost into darkness and had to peer into pitch black tanks to see the creatures, sometimes seeing only the eyes.

              The Endless Ocean, Zone 5 was a bit of a crowd puller. Huge tanks, which are some of europe's biggest with sharks, stingrays and others made for very interesting viewing. The lift to the entrance later takes visitors through the tanks for a fish eye view of what's going on. Another memorable area for us was the Kingdom of Ice, where whole walls were made of ice, making the whole area quite cold and giving an insight into the lives of the animals who live in these areas. Little Miss enjoyed the slime zone, and here there were plenty of interactive activities to keep her entertained.

              OPENING TIMES...

              The Deep is open every day between 10am and 6pm. (last admission 5pm) except 24th and 25th December,

              ENTRANCE COSTS...
              Adult (16+) - £8.95
              Children - £6.95
              Under 3's - Free
              Student - £7.50
              Senior - £7.50

              Family of 4 - £28.50
              Family of 5 - £33.95

              CONTACT DETAILS...

              The Deep
              Hull
              HU1 4DP

              Telephone: 01482 381000
              Fax: 01482 381018
              Website: www.thedeep.co.uk


              VERDICT...

              We had a great time here. There is plenty to see and the information and layout so that even people who aren't especially keen on fish will find it interesting. Lots of the exhibits had an interactive activity, so children and adults alike are kept amused, and we never felt we were just wandering around looking at fish.

              There is a cafe, serving snacks, and drinks, but given the price of the food, it's probably best to time it so you don't need to eat here.

              The whole place is well laid out, so that although it was busy we never felt we were waiting for ages to look at something and sometimes it felt as though there were very few people here.

              I would recommend the place

              Thanks for reading.

              Daniela x

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                16.03.2010 15:39
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                Worth visiting if you're in the area.

                The Deep is a major tourist attraction, housed alongside the River Humber, in Hull, East Yorkshire. I've always been interested in sea-life, so was keen to visit this attraction, which is touted as being one of the largest aquariums in the world. Having had a less-than-successful attempt at tropical fish keeping, I figured this would be a far easier way to indulge my fish-viewing pleasure...

                The Deep is a very eye-catching building, designed to look like the prow of a ship. There is a small car park outside, which costs £3 (although visitors can redeem £2 back to spend in the gift shop, or cafe). After entering the building & paying admission (we used Tesco Clubcard vouchers for admission, so not entirely sure of the costs - somewhere in the region of £8 per adult I believe), visitors follow a path through various educational activities (aimed at young children, so we by-passed most of these sections), small tanks featuring small species of sea-life, & the usual written educational boards etc.

                The first main attraction is the 'Endless Ocean' pool, which isn't very deep & can be viewed overhead, or from the side (this is ideal for little ones as the shorter you are, the easier you can view the tank!). Alongside is a shallow pool where visitors can have the opportunity to touch some of the Rays (a party of schoolchildren were doing so on our visit).

                The main aquarium can be viewed from several points along the way. There are several smaller windows built into the wall, a tunnel underneath through which visitors can walk & view the sea-life swimming past overhead, & larger viewing windows through which stunning corals can be seen, with all manner of sea-life swimming past. There are several species of shark housed at The Deep, & these are the main attraction. I could easily spend a couple of hours just watching these amazing creatures circle past, along with schools of brightly coloured fish & rays etc.

                The Deep wasn't too busy when we visited, but it was a late mid-week afternoon. I can imagine it gets very busy during school holidays & on weekends, & I'm sure viewing space is at a premium then. As it was, we were able to have a good view of the aquariums & weren't rushed in any way to move along. There are several knowledgeable employees along the way, who were always happy to answer questions.

                There is a cafe serving hot & cold snacks, with seating available in the 'prow' of the building, offering great views over the river. According to the leaflet, there is also a restaurant (The 2 Rivers) which is open on weekend evenings, whereby visitors can 'dine with the sharks' as tables are positioned alongside the aquarium itself. I imagine this would make a very pleasant evening indeed, & allow for much more peaceful viewing.

                The gift shop is extensive, & appeared to be reasonable priced (although we didn't buy anything - we spent our car parking refund in the cafe).

                Overall, a great day out, & one I would highly recommend to anyone who may be visiting the area.

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                  05.10.2009 15:35
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                  5 stars

                  The Deep opened in March 2002 amid a blaze of publicity and since then it has welcomed more than 3 million visitors and has won many awards as a visitor attraction. It is also an internationally important research facility and has become a symbol for the city of Hull.

                  The Deep is one of the deepest aquariums in the world, and for the city of Hull it has changed the skyline of the city. It has a lovely mix of aquaria, interactions for not only children but adults too, film footage and live demonstrations. As you walk through the Deep, you will notice that it takes you through the journey of the solar system and how they began and what this meant for the sea. It looks at colourful tropical reefs, the Antarctic, sandy seashores and the deep ocean trenches. It is a registered charity and is dedicated to conservation and education.

                  I particularly enjoy walking down the ramp when you first get in to the actual attraction and following the story of the ocean through time. With a handrail acting as a timeline, with one and a half centimetres equalling one million years (it's roughly 300 metres long if it was stretched out!), you don't come across human life form until the last few centimetres!

                  Reaching the lagoon of light shows the living corals in the wave power tank and gives a snorkellers view of a coral reef. The Deep tells of important research being carried out to find the best methods to grow corals that could potentially lead to new ways to restore damaged reefs. In the lagoon of light and coral realm you will see bonnet head sharks, rays, angelfish, tusk fish, hawk fish and parrotfish to name but a few.

                  The next zone you will come across is called discovery corner and gives visitors a chance to get up close and personal with animals from the British seashore. At first I was a bit concerned about how this would affect the animals, but I later found out that they only have a small number of touch sessions each day. Here you will see starfish, jellyfish and crabs.

                  The endless ocean is the next zone and my favourite, with Europe's largest tank, it represents the open ocean. The views in the Endless Ocean tank show what it would be like to dive into the open waters of the warm oceans. You will see schools of fish swimming by and even a few sharks. When you see the bottom of the tank (you can view it at different levels), which is ten metres down, the colour fades to blue because the red part of the light spectrum is absorbed first, leaving blue light to penetrate the deepest. I learnt this at the Deep, so it really is educational if I remembered that!! You also find out that at ten metres down, the pressure is equivalent to two kilos pressing on every square centimetre of your body! In the endless ocean zone you will see nurse sharks, zebra sharks, sand tiger sharks, white tip reef sharks (which look quite mean!), sawfish, morays and stingrays.

                  The next zone is all about slime. It shows how animals use slime to move around, catch their prey or create poisonous mucus. There are green and black poison arrow frogs, scorpion fish, giant African land snails, tiger slugs and sea apples.

                  Zone seven is all about the northern seas and in this display you will see cold-water fishes such as cod, which are becoming increasingly rare due to unsustainable fishing.

                  Zone eight freaked my young daughter out a little as it's the twilight zone and is quite dark, so we didn't see much of this area, but it enables you to see the stranger animals living in the deeps of the oceans. You also get the chance in this zone to see how humans are threatening life in this area of the ocean.

                  Zone nine is another of my favourites and is the kingdom of ice. Here you will notice the temperature drops and gives you a chilly feeling! It is meant to give you a feel of what it would be like to visit polar oceans, and you can even touch an ice wall, which is always there.

                  Zone ten is more of an interactive zone and I have to admit we just about skipped this one, but it is perfect for older children where you can join the crew of a research station in the sea. Here is also the end of the aquarium and where you get to ride to the surface in an underwater lift. The lift stops in the middle of the ride and allows you to watch the sharks literally swim past you. During weekends and school holidays prepare to queue here, although there is the less scenic exit of the staircase which surprise surprise is queue free!

                  The Deep carry out beach cleans every year local to the centre at Hessle Foreshore. They also work hand in hand with registered conservation initiatives throughout the UK, so bear in mind when you visit that the fee you are paying is going to a worthy cause.

                  Events

                  The Deep is available for high as an exclusive venue holding up to 250 guests. Wedding perhaps?! They also offer special rates for schools.

                  Children's parties can be booked here providing they are aged between 3 and 11.

                  Every now and then they also do children's sleepovers although with a minimum number of 100 I think this is more for local schools.

                  Each weekend the venue opens as an a la carte restaurant with a Mediterranean twist, enjoy the sharks while you enjoy your meal! You can find out more by calling 01482 382883.

                  Tickets
                  Day Tickets:
                  Adult: £8.95
                  Child: (3 - 15 inclusive): £6.95
                  Children under 3: Free
                  OAP/ Student: £7.50 (students must show a valid NUS)
                  Family of 4: £28.50
                  Family of 5: £33.95

                  The Deep Gold Membership (allows the user 1 entry per day for 12 months and 10% discount in the café and gift shop)
                  Adult: £22.50
                  Child: (3 - 15 inclusive): £16.50
                  Children under 3: Free
                  OAP/ Student: £21.50 (students must show a valid NUS)

                  Car Parking
                  There is a £3 charge for parking which I think is a bit cheeky but hey ho, that's the way of the world!

                  Opening Times:
                  Daily from 10am to 6pm

                  Eating at the Deep
                  Observatory Café and Two Rivers Café are ok, but if the day is nice why not take a picnic and go sit outside on the picnic benches.

                  The Deep,
                  Hull
                  HU1 4DP

                  E: infor@thedeep.co.uk
                  W: www.thedeep.co.uk

                  Well recommended!

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                    06.09.2009 12:42
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                    A lovely time was had by all

                    The Deep is a aquatic atraction in the city of Hull, it is on the side of the River Humber and is billed as the biggest Submarium in the world. It is situated at Sammy point at the confluence of the River Hull and the River Humber.

                    The deep is billed as the worlds only Submarium, now I'm not quite sure what a submarium is when compared with a aquarium, it was built as a part of the Millenium lottery fund and the building is a rather striking angular building. It always looks to me like a prow of a ship pushing out of a stormy sea, it is grey at the brow and blue as it slops downwards, the design is striking but also bizarrely reminiscent of the PC World design for their computer stores (though its bigger and different colours :)).

                    When you get there parking costs three pounds but you get two back to spend in the shop, or it says two squid on the ticket. The Deep opens at 10 and shuts at 5, it costs £8.95 per person and if your (un)lucky to live near Hull (I'm from Grimsby so might be a biased in that last sentence on your luck) you can fill in a form and get free entrance for a year.

                    After paying you then enter the deep, though a young girl has to swipe your card so you can enter the attraction (a bit unnecessary) and you enter the attraction proper.

                    The first thing we see are a long sloping passageway which takes us down to the bottom of the submarium, along the way we are told about the evolution of the oceans from the birth of th earth to modern day. The passageway is dark with blue lights along, and along the way there is a succession of interactive games for those older kids.

                    When you get down to the bottom, you turn a corner and encounter the first pool, it was at this point that out one year old thought he's struck gold. The first pool is a shallow one, the top of the pool is only about 5 feet high and the glass is perfectly clear allowing young children to watch the brightly coloured fish glide past. My one year stood with his nose pressed against the window for about twenty minutes, constantly trying to pat the fish as they went past. If your a bit older then there are little monitors in which you can find out which fish is which and where they are from.

                    After this the first pool, you walk further down and visit the bigger deeper pool where you can watch the sharks and rays glide past, this is for the bigger kids and adults because my one year one wasn't all that interested, I guess he has no concept over size.

                    There were three sharks, at least four rays I saw, and a few other huge fish as well as a hiding congar eel. The sharks are well worth watching, they kind of glide past and look at you with there black expressionless eyes. The deeper pool is obviously popular and there are lots of windows to allow you to watch them glide past and towards the end of the tour a totally submerged tunnel in which you can watch the sharks go past.

                    Other attractions, is an ice zone with lots of fish in smaller tanks, there is a dark zone to watch the bioluminescent fish and lots and lots of jellyfish. I think the jellyfish are the coolest tanks in the whole aquarium, they are luminescent blue and kept in a big circular ball where you can watch them puff past you.

                    Well I thought that the first time I went but the second they were totally beaten by the sand eels, these are like tiny little snakes half buried in the sand with their heads bobbing up and down, really fun to watch and they are green and red banded.

                    There is a future zone with a more political aspect looking at mans abuse of the seas, its a bit dull and doesn't really engage the viewer. WE know the issues so wrapping it around a kind of futuristic TV program is a little unnecessary.

                    The tour finishes with either a stair back up to the top or a life through the big pool it has a 5 second pause half way to let you look, don't get worried and think the lift has broken down.

                    You can then go to the cafe and the gift shop and spend your 2 squid on sweets or some bath toys. You know they are ubiquitous with every attraction. However, the cafe food was really nice and the sandwiches excellent and we had a lovely time eating looking over the Humber estuary.

                    Overall we had a great time and we are looking forward to taking our son as he grows up and interacts more with the fish.

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                      20.06.2009 12:39
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                      If you're in the vicinity, give the Deep a visit...

                      I enjoy watching fish & other 'underwater critters', so I visited 'The Deep' in Hull last year, after cashing in some Tesco clubcard vouchers for free entry tickets.

                      The Deep is tauted as being one of the most spectacular aquariums in the world. I don't know if this is true or not - I've not visited many aquariums around the world. It is certainly an impressive sight, both internally & externally. Built right alongside the Humber estuary, the building is made to look like the prow of a ship - very fitting for the location & very modern looking. The website recommends taking a riverside walk around the building with the possible oportunity to see pods of porpoises & seals. Personally, I've never seen anything other than an old pallet float by, but it's worth a look while you're there, & the new footbridge across the river Hull takes you across to the city centre if you fancy a look around.

                      The Deep itself is more aimed at children, with many educational & fun tools to interact with on the way round. This was all a bit pointless to me, but I read the information given here & there in order to make more of my visit. There are several small tanks as you go along, and some impressively large tanks also. There is the 'Open Sea' which is a large tank at a low level which you can gaze across, or bend down to see into the side of the tank. There is a living coral reef, housing brightly coloured & unusual fish.

                      The main attraction however, is the Endless Ocean tank. This is one of the largest & most spectacular aquarium exhibits in Europe, with 2.5 million litres of water, 87 tonnes of salt and a dozen species of sharks. You can get up close & personal with all manner of fish, stingrays & sharks. This was my favourite part & we spent a long time watching the various creatures of the deep swim by.

                      We visited on a weekday, in term-time, & there were relatively few visitors which meant you could stand for as long as you wanted at the aquariums without obstructing anyone else. I can imagine it will become very crowded in school holidays.

                      There are also 2 eateries. The Observatory cafe is situated overlooking the Humber, with stunning views & serves a range of drinks & snacks. There is also the 2 Rivers cafe, which serves bistro style food. 2 Rivers is also open on weekend evenings & you can 'dine with the sharks', since they have tables positioned alongside the aquarium. A highly recommended evening, but one I have never experienced personally.

                      On exiting the Deep, you pass through an extensive, & reasonably priced, gift-shop, the 'Deep-artment store'...groan....!

                      Overall, a great day out & I will be taking my son along in a couple of years time when he can appreciate everything.



                      Opening Times:

                      The Deep is open daily between 10am and 6pm. (last admission 5pm)

                      Admission Prices:

                      Adult (16+) - £8.95
                      Children - £6.95
                      Under 3's - Free
                      Student - £7.50
                      Senior - £7.50

                      Family of 4 - £28.50
                      Family of 5 - £33.95

                      Car parking at the Deep is £3, but each ticket includes a '2 squid' (groan!) voucher that can be spent in the cafe or the gift shop.

                      See www.thedeep.co.uk for more info.

                      (Also published on ciao under the same username).

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                        28.11.2008 18:58

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                        It was okay

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                        11.07.2008 15:35
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                        Excellent day out for all the family

                        The Deep,

                        I recently went to the Deep in Hull on my way back from our summer holiday in Haven. It was easy to find (as we had sat nat) and it took us right to the front door. We parked in the car park outside which cose us £3.00.

                        We were lucky and travelled here on a lovely summers day and therefore could take advantage of the picnic tables overlooking the larger river. There is a large statue of a oversized sea life creature which is really good to take photos nearby as it is overlooking the water.

                        At the beginning you are asked to enter in a specific door, this leads you past the cafe and down past the shop. You will then come to the desk, the staff here are friendly and if you show them your parking ticket you can get 2 pounds of many things at the desk or shop. We decided to spend our £2 here and get a voice tour (a device which allow you to listen as you walk around through a phone like device) and to get a guide book for an extra pound. Upon getting your tickets you then walk up the stairs (a lot of stairs...) or take the lift to the top, walking past many different things which have been found at sea , all displayed within frames. You then need to enter through a turnstile after showing the staff your ticket.

                        This is where your fun begins...

                        The deep itself is home to over 40 sharks and over 3,500 fish and its facinating to see them all swimming around however you dont see these at the beginning. There is alot of activities, predominatley for children where you can learn about the different facts of sea life and the world itself. It is really good fun and makes the walk down to the actual sea life interesting. This walk lasts for around 20 mins, and once you get to the end of your fact finding treck you will come across a large pool area full of fish and wildlife. There is an area in this section where children and adults can touch certain creatures, with the assistance of the staff. You can walk around this at your own pace and there is no need to rush.. As you continue to walk though you will see some really large tanks and this is where the big fun begins, you can see large sea life, sharks and swardfish and stand alongside them in the large tanks. You can also climb up some ladders and view them as if you were under the see, very interesting!!. After taking your time through this and watching these fantastic things you can then take some 4d glasses and watch the new for 2008 4d shark show, this is really good, and you will laugh when you see all the children try to touch the sharks and sea life as they swim towards you (i wont give too much away about that one). There is an ice age area to walk around and many more different fact finding places. Within the ice age part you can even touch a wall made of ice...freezing!!!. There is then another area which looks a bit like inside a space ship, it allows you to watch the screens, play games and have fun basically. Once you have done this you can opt to go through a lift or walk up the staircase watching the sealife as you do so. I choose to do the lift, really good fun!!

                        The cost to get into the deep is...£8.75 for an adult, £6.75 for a child and under 3's go for free...

                        Have fun xxx

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                          03.11.2006 10:23
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                          Good idea, sadly badly executed.

                          Back in the Dark Ages when I was looking at University Prospectuses and trying to decide where to go, I came across Hull University. They must have hired a really good advertising and design company because the place looked great. And in those days you could buy a house in Hull for not much more than a week's shop in Waitrose (I exagerate a little perhaps). I remember saying to my Mum, 'hey, have a look at this place'. She dismissed it out of hand saying 'You can't go to Hull, it smells of fish'.

                          And that's how Hull stayed in my mind for a long time. Sadly to day Hull doesn't smell of fish any more - the old fishing industry has been hit hard by the Common Fisheries Policy and the locals wish it did smell of fish again. However, if you want fish in Hull today, you'll probably be off to have a look at The Deep - conceived perhaps as a tribute to Hull's noble past as a major fishing centre.

                          I hadn't been to Hull for a long time and I wasn't expecting to be back again soon - it's not exactly the sort of place you pass on the way to anywhere else. So knowing that the one thing I really wanted to see was the new 'Submarium' (nonsense name, I thought) I battled the one way system and a temperamental sat nav system to find it.

                          Firstly, if you too are trying to get there with a Sat Nav system, it can be tricky. There's no road name given in the address. I plugged in Nelson Street which is apparently very close but once you see the brown tourism signs, ignore your Sat Nav and follow them. It's the kind of place you can see but, like a tantallus, you can't quite grab it.

                          First impressions - I'd love to say they were 'Wow! What an amazing looking building?' but in fact my first impressions were 'Gosh, is the weather ALWAYS as awful as this?' The wind was blowing a gale and the spray off the Humber was spiking horizontally across the car park. Apparently the building was designed by Terry Farrell and Partners but I'm not going to pretend I've heard of him - however, it's got touches of the style of Norman Foster (my architecture hero) or Frank Gehry.

                          Faced with an iconic new building, I would normally have taken a big deep breath and got a good eyeful of this stunning wedge of silver and glass before walking in. However, with that wind, I could hardly stand up, let alone admire the view so I put my head down and ran for it.

                          Background
                          **********
                          It's only fair at this stage to point out that I adore big aquariums and have been to many really good ones. Therefore, I may be a bit harsh in comparing The Deep to places like the Oceanarium in Lisbon (see my recent review) and the KL Aquarium in Kuala Lumpur. I'm also a keen diver and have seen a lot of good stuff in the raw so I tend to scepticism when the wrong kinds of fish are put together or the coral is plastic.

                          If you haven't been to one of these big aquariums, you'll probably really enjoy The Deep - but in my capacity as a 'Fish Anorak', I possibly set higher criteria to judge an aquarium by.

                          Car Parking
                          **********
                          There's a mid-sized car park beside The Deep. I would imagine at busy times it wouldn't be anything like big enough. I arrived at a few minutes to 5 pm and there were only half a dozen cars there.

                          In front of you there's a nice big bronze of a shark that would probably keep some kids amused for a while and be good for some holiday snaps.

                          The car park is £3 - I thought that was pretty shocking really, especially as I was on my own so it was adding a lot to the cost of my visit. However, the £3 ticket includes a sticker worth £2 that you can exchange for food and drink. I used my discount to get £2 off the guidebook, making it a much more reasonable £1.50.

                          Entry
                          ****
                          The last entries are at 5 pm - I had to run to beat the deadline so maybe it's a good thing that the weather stopped me loitering over the building. I would have been furious after parting with £3 for the car park if they hadn't let me in because there's ABSOLUTELY nothing else to do around The Deep.

                          Prices -
                          Adults £8.00
                          OAPs/students £6.50
                          Children £6.00
                          Family of 4 £25.00
                          Family of 5 £30.00.

                          Personally, I think that's a bit on the steep side.

                          Off to see the Fish
                          *****************
                          After paying, you walk along a corridor and take a lift or the stairs to the 3rd floor of the building. The tour then involves walking down a series of wide ramps and working your way from top to bottom. There's quite a lot of walking involved and if you are in a wheelchair, you might want to check your brakes before taking on the hairpin bends. I had the impression that part of the purpose of the ramps was to give the impression that the place was bigger than it really was.

                          I entered through a turnstile and right in front was a beautiful small tank of tiny box fish, and some green fellas that looked like a cross between a sea horse and a piece of grass. The chap at the turnstile came over to talk to me about the tank and I really enjoyed that personal touch, brief though it was. However, this was a nice tank and my hopes were high for the rest of the tour.

                          Then started the interminable ramps and the excessive noise. For goodness sakes, the sea is a pretty quite place, one of the benefits of diving is there are no mobile phones. And certainly not non-stop looped video screens telling me about the history of the earth. The first ramp is presented as an Earth Timeline with distance representing time since the world began. Oh boy, I'm so not interested in all of that stuff. I have a degree in geology and I don't need another 'big bang to present' model. All along the ramp are touch screens for the kids to play with, quizzes and video screens. It was empty when I was there but I could just picture thousands of school kids running back and forth, fiddling with all the displays. Where was the peace and quite I was seeking and more importantly, where were the fish?

                          The first big tank display was the Lagoon of Light - now this was a gem of a tank, full of all the things you'd expect to see in a coral lagoon - banner fish, tangs, damselfish, parrot fish, little spotted rays and some gorgeous little bonnethead sharks (a bit like hammer heads but with a shovel instead of a hammer). The lighting in this tank was bright and the colours were sharp and true.

                          According to the website, it's supposed to be possible to put your head into this tank through a bubble but if this was available, it wasn't obvious where or how.

                          Tucked in a corner near by the coral lagoon was something called the Discovery Corner. This wasn't open when I visited but apparently the small tanks were filled with creatures that the kids can touch and play with. They limit the 'stress' caused to the animals but having just a few sessions each day. Shame they don't think more about the stress to the humans!

                          More ramps, more video screens, more games and quizzes and I'm off to the big tank - the 'Endless Ocean'. Now the 'big tank' is the one thing that really makes or breaks a good aquarium. If you get a truly spectacular one, then I can forgive all the other annoyances. The viewing of the Endless Ocean tank is good - floor to ceiling glass walls give great visibility but that's hampered a bit by the glass being curved and slightly distorting. The tank was quite gloomy - I wondered if someone had turned down the lights at first. Everything was rather grey and poorly lit - so much so that big sharks could appear suddenly and I missed them a few times. The large rays down at the bottom of the tank could sometimes only be seen by flashes of the underside of their 'wings'.

                          What's in the Big Tank?
                          *******************
                          Ten out of ten for the range of sharks and other 'big fish' - a rather lower score for the smaller stuff. There are a lot of rather dull grey and silver fish swimming around in shoals.

                          The sharks are not your little babies - these are big fellas and some have the sense of pre-historic menace that really attracts me to them. Whilst the white tip reef sharks are quite small and sleek, like sports cars, there are some big ugly ones in there that look like they've been hiding out in Loch Ness for a few million years. They have nurse sharks, tiger sharks, zebrasharks and some odd things like wobbegongs and the Green Sawfish. The Sawfish is more closely related to rays than sharks but looks like a squashed shark with a hedgetrimmer stuck on its nose.
                          There are some big rays and some large morays as well. I think the tank is a bit over-crowded.

                          Other tanks
                          **********
                          As with most big aquaria, there are a number of other sub-zone tanks around the centre. These include a 'twilight zone' which ought to contain lots of glowing luminous critters - I think I went wrong at that stage because all I could see were yet more video screens.

                          There's an excellent tank of cod that might make you think twice next time you go to the chippy. There's a cold water zone and displays of anemone clown fish, poisonous lion and scorpion fish and many others. I generally find these small displays quite interesting but there was nothing that really stuck in my mind.

                          The Submarine
                          ************
                          Now maybe it's just because the video screens and noise were really getting to me by this stage, but I didn't explore this area. There is some kind of re-enactment where the kids can pretend to be piloting a submarine into the deep ocean. It all seemed a bit 'Blakes Seven' to me and I was really teed off with all the gimmicks by this stage so I marched off in search of more fish.

                          The Wow Factor
                          *************
                          Every big aquarium needs a good 'Wow!' moment and it's usually delivered near the end. The Deep has two - neither of which is a 'megawow' but both will impress first time I'm sure. The first is a tunnel in the tank - it's quite a short one but it's effective. When I was in the tunnel some staff had just thrown in some food and there were three large sharks cuddled up to the glass looking for food. It was an excellent view. I would imagine that at busy times this would really get congested. Other aquaria I have visited (e.g. Blue Planet in Ellesmere Port, KL Aquarium) have moving walkways and longer tunnels and still have to heard people through to stop them blocking so this shorter tunnel looks like it would have problems. The final Wow is the 'great glass elevator' - my term, not theres - which actually rises up through the tank, stopping for a few seconds in the middle where you can be ignored by all the fish. There is apparently a long wait for this during the day but I breezed straight in at 5.30 with no delay.

                          Catering
                          *******
                          There seem to be a lot of places to eat and drink but at 5.30 they were all closed. One of the restaurant areas gives you the opportunity to go up to the 4th floor and look out over the Humber - the brownest water in the universe, I should imagine. I spotted an indoor 'picnic' zone which seemed like a good idea because a day out for a family is a bit pricey and you might want to bring your sarnies.

                          Shop
                          ****
                          As you'd expect there's a big shop where you can stock up on all the cuddly stingrays and plastic shark pencil sharpeners you could ever need. I found it very easy to resist.

                          Overall Recommendation
                          *********************
                          If you haven't been to a big aquarium and you aren't likely to fly off to one of the world leading ones then yes, you should go and have a look.
                          If I were in the North and could get equally well to this or the Blue Planet at Ellesmere Port, I'd drive the other way down the M62 and head off to the Blue Planet for a better variety, less irritating gimmicks and an excellent shopping centre on the doorstep.
                          If you are in the area - then definitely give it a look
                          If you have kids, they'll probably love it.
                          But for purist fish anoraks like me, this isn't one to return to.

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                            15.10.2006 23:06

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                            For the reviewer who lives in Hull during term-time, why not walk to The Deep from the city centre instead of taking your car? It's only 10-15 minutes. The Deep car park belongs to the council and it is they who pocket the £3, not The Deep. The council charges because it is classed as city-centre parking. Where else in the city centre could you park for £3 for 6 hours during the day?

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                            05.09.2006 17:15
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                            A great place to learn all about different varieties of fish.

                            We decided to visit the Deep whilst on holiday in Yorkshire. It is situated on the Banks of the River Humber, which is in YORKSHIRE.


                            Getting There:

                            We travelled by car and although we could see the building has some trouble actually getting to it. However this was a year ago and there was lots of roadworks at the time so maybe this has improved since.

                            If you travel by train you also need to get a bus. Or you can use the Park and Ride that goes to the City Centre. The deep is a short walk away from here.

                            A normal visit is meant to last around two hours so you could combine it with a shopping trip.
                            There is a car park at the Deep, costing £3. If you present this at the shop or cafe you will get a £2 discount.


                            Opening Times:

                            The opening times are 10am to 6pm every day. It is recommended you visit in the afternoon as it is meant to be quieter but the day we visited this was not the case.

                            We arrived just after 10am. There was a small queue so waited about 5 mins to get in. When we came out at 2pm, it was an estimated two hour wait to get in.


                            Prices:

                            Adult - £8.00
                            Child - £6.00
                            Under 4s - Free
                            Senior/Student - £6.50

                            Family of 4 - £25.00 (max 2 adults)
                            Family of 5 - £30.00 (max 2 adults)

                            I had £20 in vouchers, and the price for a family of four was £21 at the time we visited, so only cost us £1.


                            The Tour:

                            Once you are in you take the lift right to the top, this is the start of your journey into the deep. If you are not quite ready here you will also find toilets and the Cafe.

                            To enter the tour you go through the turnstiles. As you begin the tour you realise you are on a downwards slope which takes you all the way to the bottom. All along the way there are computer screens with information, hanging objects, posters, etc all full of information. Unfortunately there just seemed far too much to take in. Not being very tall most of the screens were blocked by taller adults, this meant the children were getting very bored. As it was the first section, entitled the Big Bang is all about that. Now this has always been a matter of debate, and personally I am quite offended that someone things that I was once a fish, but the point here is that the way it is shown indicates it is a definite fact and not just a possibility. Since the children were off we skipped this section and moved on to the next, The Myths and Legends Gallery. Basically it was fish with strange names but again just lots of writing to read.

                            The idea of evoloution continues right down until you reach the bottom of the slope, and until now no sign of real fish.

                            You now get to the 10 metre deep tank, which is full of various sharks. There are a few other tanks about with fish from all over, also a coral tank which you can look at through a bubble inside the tank.

                            Talks are held in these areas throughout the day.
                            Down at the bottom you now reach the Sub Station Deep Blue One. It is full of simulators, computers and lots of things to touch. You can pilot a submarine or see how long you would last on an expedition by making various choices. This area gets very busy and despite waiting some time we never got a chance to try any of these out.

                            You can now walk through the Kingdom of Ice where the walls are made of ice. There is also lots more info about what creatures survive in the sub zero temperatures. There is also a section of enviromental issues and how rising sea levels will affect the place you live. Also learn the results of over fishing and marine pollution.

                            You have now reached the Great Ocean Floor. Here you can walk through the Deepest viewing Tunnel in Europe. As you go through the sharks swim above your heads. Eerie but facinating.

                            The only way from here is Up either by stairs or in the Underwater Lift. We decided to take the stairs as there was quite a queue for the lift. You still get a very good view inside the tank, just get a little more puffed out.

                            Once at the top you are back at the toilets and Cafe. You cannot go back round the tour though as you will have had your ticket taken the first time.

                            We decided to stop for dinner. The prices were quite reasonable and there was a good choice on offer. The meals are ready cooked and kept warm in a servery. I can't remember exactly what we had except for the kids pizza but I know it was tasty. The puddings were particularly good too, though my two year old son ate most of my lemon meringue pie.

                            We decided to go outside to the viewing area after, which is up a small flight of stairs. I did not see any disabled access here. Here we discovered a smaller cafe offering sandwiches and coffee in a relaxed setting with big comfy settees. But we passed all this by to go outside.
                            There is a free telescope here that allows you to see right across the River Humber.
                            Unfortunately it has been designed for people over 6ft so only my husband was able to use it. Both my children and I were very disappointed at this. All that is required is a small box or stool. Maybe they have one by now.

                            We then took the lift back down to the entrance to go round the shop. Again very crowded. A good selection of products and good prices.
                            Once we found the end of the queue we slowly made our way to the tills and paid.

                            We left at about 2pm, and as I said the estimated queue time was now 2hrs. Whether it is always like this or a one off I could not say. But I would reccommend going earlier just in case.


                            Our Views:

                            As for what we thought of it, Well the four children, all under 7 appeared to be thoroughly bored stiff. There was just too much information that had to be read and we all know kids prefer pictures. The tanks were good but no different to sea life centres. They were more interested in the Sub Station section but as I said far too busy to get to try any of it.

                            I would suggest if possible you do not go during holiday times to get the most from this place.

                            I'm glad we went and very glad we only paid £1. I would recommend this place to adults and older children. It is a good learning place if you are prepared to read everything on display, which could take a while.

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                            • More +
                              09.05.2006 23:40
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                              Great day out, pitty about the price!

                              I am a poor student living in Hull throughout term time, and having lived in here for around 6 months thought it was time to visit one of the citys top attractions, 'The Deep' which everyone seems to rave on about. Upon arriving the machine in the car park wanted £3 just to park, and finding nowhere else nearby whereby to leave the car reluctantly paid this. After entering the amazing architecture of the building that is 'the deep' overlooking the river we were charged £7 entry, there is a discount for students however but i forget how much, but its not cheap! We decided to pay, since we had already paid to leave the car and went in, 'the deep' in itself as actually great, unlike anything you will have seen before with so much to sea, and great educational opportunities for children and adults alike! it takes a couple of hours to go around before you reach the end, where there is a cafe from which there are great views over the delightful sludgy brown river Humber, and there is also a gift shop, both extortionately expenseve and so we decided to bypass without purhasing anything! This was a great day out, although in my opinion not worth the priced charged!

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