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York Dungeon (York)

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£61.74 Best Offer by: expedia.co.uk See more offers
9 Reviews

12 Clifford Street / York / YO1 1RD.

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    9 Reviews
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      04.07.2013 16:55

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      On the 21st June I went to York to visit the York dungeonsWhen I got there, I had to join a group and lucky I had a voucher in the mini guidebook, which took the price down to £10.50The only thing the photo at the start was very expensive to pay at the end.The shows were good and the actors made us laugh and scream the shows get the audience to take part in and you get pick on by certain characters.

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      31.10.2010 22:07

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      we got our tickets over the internet which made it slightly cheaper and got you out of queueing to pay at the door, how ever we got there 15 mins b4 our allocated time and still had a good 20 min wait. it was well worth the wait though and would recommend you go and visit. cant wait to take my 8 yr old daughter but think it too scary for her at the moment.

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      24.05.2010 17:16
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      well worth a trip, but maybe book in advance.

      What an amazing way to spend your day!

      The tickets could rack up, being £14.50 each for adult tickets on the door. You can however book in advance over the internet, and get tickets from as low as £7.25 per adult. I also know that you can exchange Tesco vouchers for tickets, which is a great idea if you know when you will be going.

      It's really easy to find, on Clifford Street, which is on the way down to the river. If you have a map, you should have no trouble finding it. It is certainly worth the 5 minute walk, and is a great way to spend a few hours. As you enter, you form a small queue, as they admit you in groups, which makes it more fun! As you wait, they take your picture posing with various instruments of torture, and you can then buy this picture in the shop later.

      I was slightly concerned that it would be disgusting, like some of the Chamber of Horrors attractions. I was however, pleasantly surprised. The attraction consists of 11 separate actor led tableaux. I won't ruin it too much for you, but I'll tell you my favourites!

      One of the first scenarios was the Great Plague. The actor who did this was great, really involving everyone in what was essentially a disgusting show. This might be a favourite with the kids!

      I also loved the Judgement of Sinners. Again a great actor, but instead of a doctor's assistant, he is a formidable judge, judging each of you for sins you have committed. He was very funny, even though we were a group of strangers. Were we a group of friends, I'm sure it would have been even funnier... He then sent us through to the toturer, who explained some of the instruments with the help of an unwilling member of the group.

      All in all, it passed rather too quickly, despite us actually being in there for well over an hour. The shop is situated at the end, with an exit to the street. You can also visit the shop without going in the dungeons themselves, which is a good touch.

      There were plenty of cheaper gift options here, but they all looked really good. No cheap tat here, there were plenty of ways to justify spending your money!

      I would most certainly go again, as I really enjoyed myself. I would however consider booking in advance, as I think that the slightly steep ticket price is the only downside to this attraction.

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        25.01.2010 23:51
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        .

        The York Dungeon is part of the chain of Dungeons that includes Edinburgh and London. I've never been to the others, so I can't compare. What I can say is that the York Dungeon is a thoroughly enjoyable, somewhat gory and very interactive way to spend a few hours if you are in the area.

        The York Dungeon is located on Clifford St, close to the river and is just a short walk from both the bus and train stations. It is located in a Grade II listed building and, as a result, there are some restrictions for wheelchair users, however they have done everything possible to make the attraction accessible to all. It's open 7 days a week, excluding Christmas Day, from around 10.30 until 5pm (depending on the season) and there are often special events on during school holidays.
        Entry to the York Dungeon is certainly not cheap - £14.30 for adults and £10.22 for children - however you can make some savings if you buy your tickets online in advance or if you have a Merlin Pass (an annual pass that gives you unlimited entry to various attractions in the UK included Sea Life Centres, Dungeons and Chessington World of Adventures).

        The price, I have to say, almost put us off but we didn't want to lose face at the reception desk so we parted with our money. It's a crafty trick they have there; there are no prices outside and by the time you have got to reception, you are already too far inside to escape! Having said that, we were very glad that we had paid as it was (just about!) worth the money.
        We went on early on a weekday morning, just as it had opened, so experienced none of the huge queues and cramped rooms that I have heard others talk about and I would highly recommend you do the same. In fact there was only the two of us and one other couple, which meant that we had full access to all the exhibits and it also meant that the interactive shows were a lot more fun.

        The best thing about the York Dungeon is the interactive live shows, which cover everything from the plague and witch hunting to the escapades of one Dick Turpin, who was executed in York. My particular favourite was the judge's quarters. In 18th century Britain, there were over 200 hundred crimes that were punishable by death. In this show the judge picks on one of the audience and it is their crime that is under discussion. I was delighted to see my other half on the docks, accused of 'dancing like a dad at a wedding'! The actress playing the judge was excellent in getting everyone involved and was very comical in doing so. At the end of the session, we were advised to 'run for your lives' a sentiment that is echoed in all of the shows.
        The actors are very good in their roles and go a long way to involve you and even make you laugh whilst educating you about some of the very gory details of our British past. This is the main reason why we enjoyed the visit so much - even though there were only four of us in there, every effort was made to ensure that we were having a good time.

        In between the shows, you walk through various displays that tell you more about what you are going to see. The attention to detail is excellent and the whole place is very atmospheric; dark lighting, scary sounds and smoke effects fill the halls. You really have to look hard at the exhibits, which takes up a lot of concentration and really makes you submerse yourself in the period being displayed. This is the excuse I am using for having the life frightened out of me at one point anyway. I was engrossed in the methods of discerning witches from common women when I turned to find a huge man covered in boils looking over my shoulder enquiring as to whether I was enjoying myself. It's probably a good thing that there were no children in there to witness my reaction. The other half thought it was hilarious, particularly since I'd laughed heartily when the judge had made mince-meat of him.
        Overall we had a thoroughly enjoyable couple of hours in the dungeon, so much so that we decided to purchase a small souvenir in the gift shop that is conveniently located on the way out. I would highly recommend this attraction if you are visiting York, however I would be wary of taking small children in there as some of the exhibits are quite scary and they would be easily frightened.

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          20.04.2009 19:29

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          Well worth a visit.

          The Dungeon has changed from the last time we visited it. We found the smoke stifling but atmospheric. The compulsary photo was an unnecessary imposition on our time. The darkness and lack of visible signs as to where to go was a bit confusing but the frightening appearance of the doctor's assistant made some of the party jump as it was intended to do.The dialogue of the deputy Surgeon and his assistant was quite good and funny at times. Some of the posters were in small writing and difficult to read for us visually impaired visitor's. The Torturer enjoyed her demonstration of the implements as did the victims girlfriend. The Judge doubling up as the surgeons assistant was very good in both parts but the best of them all was the innkeeper and his story of someone called Williams. Dick Turpin was an interesting experience as the voice moved round the room and we all waited in expectation of a tap on the shoulder. The seats dropped as Turpin was hanged and made us all jump. Overall an improvement from our last visit and well worth a visit although the cost was a bit high. Edinburgh is still the best Dungeon experience we have had so far with London 2nd but York is not far behind. Amsterdam and Hamburg are on our list

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          13.11.2005 23:05
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          A brilliant place to visit with the children

          I have visited The York Dungeon on two occassions now, the first time was with my children about five years ago, which was great fun as they were young teenagers. The second time I went with my husband and two adult friends - so I will try to explain the reactions with both visits - as believe me it was totally different without the children.

          Well to start with you will find the York Dungeon in the York City, it is just off the river in Clifford Street. You have to cue up for a little while, queuing all depends on the amount of people there. On our first visit there were about 30 or more people and it took about 30mins to get in, on our second visit there were only about 10 people infront of us and it was about a 10 min wait. Whilst you waiting you are entertained by the staff that are dressed up as plague victims - they come round and talk to you, shout at you and pick on the children in the queue. It is very entertaining, they say things like "Are you Brave or Stupid?", "We've got tortures for you, unbelieable pain awaits you inside". They also ask you questions about yourself and give you some cheeky reply to your answers. All in all they keep you entertained, which stops you getting bored waiting and gets you in the mood for whats to come.

          Now for prices:

          £10.95 for adult
          £7.95 for children aged 5-14yrs
          £9.95 for oap's
          £9.95 for students

          Guide books are £3.50 -

          You can pre buy your tickets in the hope of jumping the queues - the prices are the same and can be bought with a credit card on line at www.thedungeons.com. If you decide to take the online route for your tickets, you would receive an e-mail confirmation which you need to print off to show at the entrance desk on your arrival at the dungeons. The disadvantages with this are, if you forgot your print out, you could very well be refused entry or have to pay again. The credit card holder must be in attendance for security reasons.

          Back to the visit - you have queued up and got through the main doors, you now have a 5min wait whist everyone pays, then armed with your guidebook you start your tour. You go through doors (painted black), they close behind you and you find yourself in a dark tunnel, the walls look like dungeon walls complete with dangly things that brush against you making you nervous. You see displays of plague victims at their worse (not a pretty sight), there are information plaques on the walls to read and gain a little more knowledge of the history of the great plague. To think the childrens nursery rhyme 'Ring a ring of roses',' a tissue a tissue we all fall down', comes from the plague. The first signs were of a cold. It got so bad that if you sneezed you were bricked up alive so you couldn't pass on your germs.

          This is demostrated on the first part of the tour, you are walking round a slim corridor looking at the models when one jumps out from behind a wall screaming, she is covered in boils and didn't look too well I must say. On our first visit with the children, this made my daughter jump out of her skin, she was with my husband just ahead of us, so they stayed put, hoping that I would trigger it off when I went past, fortuneately I didn't, so they started to tell me about it giggling away when the lady behind us let out a squeal (it got her). This put the atmosphere is a jolly mood as we continued on our way.

          A little more info here about The Plague - it first appeared in Europe in October 1347 - carried on ships trading with South East Asia. The disease got into England via the Dorset port of Melcombe in August 1348 and quickly spread. There are no accurate records, but it is estimated that between 1/3 and 1/2 of Europes population lost their lives to the plague - that is estimated over 24 million people. People believed that plague was sent by god and it signified the end of the world.

          Anyway back to our tour - to end the visit on the Plague you come to your first interactive experience. You are faced with an actor dressed for the part with a silver finger with a sharp pointed nail - he picked on the children and the adults, whilst telling the story of the doctors during the plague and what they had to do (model with a beak and black cloak in the background, next to a body all cut open). The actor really gets into his part shouting at us asking if we want to volenteer to be cut up, whispering in your ear saying you will be next. He was very good. Making it entertaining for both the children and the adults.

          I enjoyed this part on both our visits. My only complaint is that it is a small space and people have to move into every corner available to fit in. This added to the heat and the stuffiness of the room. It was after visiting this with our friends, that my friend could not take any more and asked to leave. The actor had finished and people were moving on to the next stage when she announced the heat was making her feel ill. The actor could not have been more helpful, our friend told us to stay and continue the tour and the actor helped her up the stairs and out of the building. Just a note here whilst we continued the tour the staff from the Dungeon could not have been more helpful. Whilst entertaining the crowds queuing to get in, they kept popping over to make sure our friend was ok. A big thankyou to them for looking after her.

          Back to the tour, the next section we visited was the Vampires - we had to wait for a few mins until the group infront of us had finished so we could go in. I think they do this to build up the tension and give you a little more time to look at the models of torture around the walls. Whilst waiting a girl dressed to impress (another zombie maybe), jumps out of the a dark corner again keeping the mood going.

          Once you have gone through the doors and they close behind you, it is your group around the vampire catcher (the actor), a corpse of a man and a ram. The actor tells you the story of the vampire and some history of the legends, myths etc - demonstrating the instruments they use to kill a vampire. Once again he involves the audience and once again something scarey happens whilst you are concentrating to make you jump. I won't go too much into the details as I wouldn't want you to expect the climax, better to be surprised - ha ha. (evil laugh)

          We found this quiet amusing, I must say it was better when we took our children, I think that's because you enjoy there reactions more. On our first visit the lady behind me all the way round was made to jump on numerous occassions, this seem to make our visit more enjoyable as well. On our second visit our group were a little less jumpy and not as interactive with the actors as our first visit. Which is possibly why we enjoyed the first visit more.

          You know it is the end of the demonstration as they usually tell you to flee for you own safety, all part of the ongoing acting and building the tensions.

          Next on the visit is the Vikings, again you have a little wait whilst the room is being made ready and whilst you wait another you girl is talking to you about what is coming up, saying that we are having an audience with her father - you go into a room where there is a display infront of you and a statue of the girls father - a hologram image appears on the face and he starts to talk to you - when he has finished he screams at you to get out.

          This section covers the brutality of the vikings and their methods of torture, in the corner of the room there is a model of someone being tortured.

          I found this section the least interesting of them all, it really made a difference not having the actor there getting the audience involved.

          The next area was a court room, everyone crammed in and the judge was just above you looking down at you. He called someone out of the audience and made them take the stand accusing them of some siily crime and asking them how they plead, he then dishes out a punishment and calls someone else up. This area was called Judgement of the Sinners. I feel this was more for adult participation, but the children love their parents being put on the stand.

          This section shows simply, the evil minds of the 18th century, when they gave judicial punishments for very minor offences. Your punishment could be banishment, loss of a hand, going in the stocks or dungeons and possibly even death.

          There are 3 further sections left of your tour, during our 2nd visit we did not get any further than what I have just written about, so you will now have to rely on my old memory and our first visit around 5 yrs ago.

          The Roman Legion - What we had for the Roman Legion was sitting on benches in a room and the walls lit up showing film and the history of the Romans and the hauntings - We laugh about this part of our first visit, my daughter put her arm round the back of me and lightly touched my back making me scream and jump (still living that down today).

          Apparently there are around 150 ghost and ghouls wandering on the streets of York, which is one of the most haunted cities in Britain. (afraid I didn't knowingly see any).

          The Gunpowder Plot - this gives you the story of Guy Fawkes (he was born in York, hence the connection). Here you saw some of the terrible and horrifying ways of torture that have been used. There are no holes barred here on the sights you see, it has been made to look very authentic.

          Finally you have the story of Dick Turpin the most famous highwayman and his demise. You are there to witness the hanging of Dick Turpin and an actor tells you the story of Dick Turpin and what has bought him to this sorry state. You actually see him hang - the trap door opens and there he goes. They try to make it so you feel you are at a real hanging.

          Your tour is over, it has taken just over 1hr and you make for the exit which of course leads you through the gift shop. Here they are selling souvenirs of your visit. I did find this expensive. But aren't all gift shops.

          To summerize I feel that this is a great tourist attraction, a lot depends on how you approach it. If you go in with an open mind and are willing to have a laugh and join in, then it is great fun. Be ready to participate as you may not get a choice if they pick on you!!!

          It is fun for both children and adults and as we found on our second visit the staff are wonderful and kind as they took care of our friend. As I stated earlier we enjoyed our first visit with the children more, I feel that children can make the visit as they are so attentive and really get taken in by the actors making it a thorougly enjoyable experience.

          Although pricey, I would reccommend a visit at least once.

          If you enjoy the experience there are other dungeons around the country and aboard all showing different exhibits relative to the area. These are sited in Edinburgh, London and Hamburg. There will be one opening in Amsterdam shortly.

          Before I go thought I should mention Transport - there are lots of car parks around the city - we paid £7.00 for 5hr stay, £4.00 for a 3hr stay, to give you some idea of charges. There is also a Railway Station which is within walking distance from The Dungeons, the same with the Bus Station. There is also park and ride available for York.

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            24.03.2004 17:06
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            Ok, I admit it. I watch Most Haunted. I am one of those sad people who spends far too much time watching the live weekend show and then sits there and announces that it was rubbish, only to settle back down for another dose as soon as the opportunity arises. I wonder what it is that makes being scared such a great feeling? I am the worlds biggest coward, but I love scary films and spooky places. One of the recent live shows was centred around the beautiful historic city of York and one of the locations visited was The York Dungeon. I have to say I don't need an excuse to visit York, it is to me one of this countries treasures, but when my son asked whether we could go visit the dungeon I jumped at the opportunity of a day out. Situated on the corner of Clifford Street in York, not to far from the majestic Clifford's Tower I have to say that my first impression of the place wasn't that good. The building itself made me think of some of the old banks that we have here in Nottingham, boring and official looking. There was a queue of about 20 people outside the building and there was a young man dressed as a zombie entertaining the crowd as they waited to enter the dungeon. He was funny. He was having a joke with the people waiting, regardless of age and any doubts I had about standing in the queue went completely out of the window. " Who's here for the bondage experience?" He asked those waiting " Who's here to be whipped and chained?" You haven't met my husband, but he's a strange guy and his hand was up like a shot. We waited in the queue for about 15 minutes as people were let in in groups of about 12. As we followed everyone into the building it occurred to me that this experience was either going to be very good, or very tacky. I
            ;t was quite dark inside. We paid at the desk and bought a very well presented glossy brochure which cost us three pounds fifty. There was a sign above the desk that said that if we weren't offered the opportunity to purchase a brochure by the staff we would receive one free, an effective reminder to the staff to remember the suggestive selling training they had obviously received and I remember secretly hoping that the young girl manning the till would forget. We were ushered forward to the first 'experience' and I have to say that experience is the right word to use for this place. There were displays depicting the plague, not the rats and the fleas, here the emphasis was on the gory side of living during the plague, the boils, the puss and the horror of it all. We were at the front of our group and as we passed one area there was an almighty scream and the grotesque head of a boil laden woman appeared at a window. No, it wasn't a mirror. It certainly made us jump though. Each area of the dungeon has it's own interactive area and for the plague section we were ushered into a doctors surgery where a man who looked a lot like the guy with the withered hand in Scary Movie 2, told us all about the torturous healing techniques that were used back then. At one point he demonstrated on a very realistic dummy how blood letting would occur and as he touched the 'victim' a squirt of water shot out and made us all jump back. Our next journey took us to a time when the superstitions of witchcraft were everywhere and people lived in fear of being accused. Again there were displays and exhibits and then an interactive area. We were ushered into a dark area where above us there was a bridge with a dummy leaning over looking into the water where you could see the body of a woman, submerged below the ripples. I thought it looked pretty boring, I have to say, and
            made for the door to the next area, anxious to move on. I jumped out of my skin when the 'dummy' on the bridge shouted "Halt" He then began to tell us of his job as a witch hunter and pointing down at me I was accused of being a witch and dancing naked in the moonlight. (Mental note to self to get the height of the front fence raised) I held my hands up. I admitted being a witch, apparently I would then be burned at the stake. The poor women who protested their innocence were subjected to the ducking stool where they would be held under water for long periods of time. If they drowned, they were innocent. If they didn't they were witches and died anyway. Comforting thought isn't it! As we moved through the Dungeon we came across many experiences including the Romans, the Vikings, a clever optical illusion called The pit of Despair and my hubby's favourite The Torture Chamber. In The Torture Chamber there were gadgets to make your eyes water. Suspended on the wall, as you entered the chamber was a man on a wheel that was being turned and stretched, mercilessly. My son got a lot of pleasure out of turning the wheel as fast as he could, I can see he resembles his father. We had to stay in this area for a few minutes as the group in front were still in the interactive room that accompanied the chamber. A stately looking gentleman, with a regal wig and walking stick wandered the room talking to himself. At one point he shouted "Mercy" out loud and when the crowd laughed he shook his stick at one of the children and screamed "I'm not insania" which made us all laugh again. The waiting between sections wasn't too much of an inconvenience, but it could have been better and I would have liked to have moved on a little quicker. T
            he experience that accompanied the Torture Chamber was the story of Guy Fawkes and although I know he has a connection with York, I didn't actually feel that the story belonged in the experience. I noticed some of the children got a little restless by then and when we moved into the final experience this didn't get any better. The final room is dedicated to Dick Turpin who was hung at York. The was a very clever camera set up that projected moving facial images onto a model that depicted Turpin. I have to say I was impressed but even I had started to feel a little restless by this point. The final part of the tour was to witness the hanging of Mr Turpin and the little guy in the wig appeared again and tried to encourage us to become the watching crowd "Everybody jeer!" he shouted. There were a few half hearted boo's but most people just looked at him blankly. After the hanging there was nothing more to do than follow everyone into the obligatory shop that all these sorts of exhibits seem to add to the exit of every tour. The shop was expensive but it was very nice to see that most of the stock was relevant to the tour and there were trick displays and fake blood rather than Carebears and Barbie Dolls. As we had walked the experience I had noted toilets and corridors that provided not only alternative access for people in wheelchairs but also a get out clause for those of a nervous disposition. The was a sign at the start of the tour that gave a warning for nervous people but although I could see very young children getting upset, I think most others would be fine. I have to say that parts of this experience did make me jump and the effort put into the costumes and the exhibits were really appreciated, it just felt like some parts of the tour, especially the Guy Fawkes area
            just didn't fit in. I did see a sign that said they were going to add a vampire section soon. I would love to see what they could do with that story. The whole experience took just over an hour to complete and as I have said before we were in the queue outside for 15 minutes. Had it been a cold wet day I doubt we would have waited as there is little room to queue inside. The York Dungeon is by no means a cheap thrill. Adult Tick et GBP 10.45 Ch ild Ticket (5 - 9 years) GBP 7.45 Child Ticket (10 - 14 years) GBP 8.45 Family tickets and fast track tickets are available and you can book online. I definitely enjoyed my visit to York Dungeon, it was fun. I can see why they hike the price up though, it's not the sort of place you would visit twice, after all it's the element of surprise that makes it so exciting. All in all a definite reccomnedation, but a pricey one. If you have bloodthirsty children or like me a strangey sadistic husband, I would give this place a go. Thanks for reading Mand xx

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              10.01.2002 03:30
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              On a recent visit to the beautiful city of York, my husband and I decided we just had to visit the York Dungeon…and was I glad I had someone to grab!It might have been better if it had been my husband...but that's another story! Anyway, this is a decidedly scary experience. The Dungeon is actually underground, which adds to the chilling,ice-running-through-your veins atmosphere. As you descend you hear the pitiful wails of torture victims, the bloodcurdling screams of those poor souls condemned to be bricked up alive, the terrifying cries of those being sent down for a stretch (on the rack!) or strung up on the gibbet.(He got a suspended sentence - they hung him!) Moving cautiously along, our first shock came when one of the “exhibits” reached out and grabbed us. Yes, these are the guides, dressed in costume,and an evil-looking bunch they are too.A lot scarier than Anne Robinson! We were invited to visit the plague doctor in his surgery, where he was administering to one of his patients (more like finishing him off!) The doctor wore a long beak-like mask, filled with sweet-smelling herbs to ward off the plague.(From where we get the slang term “quack”) Since the doctor could do nothing for us( we were NHS patients) we moved along to witness the trial and subsequent execution of the notorious highwayman Dick Turpin, who mounted the scaffold with an air of dignity, except for the tremor in his right leg.Being a bloodthirsty lot,we cheered as the trapdoor opened and Dick went down in the world. Next we met the conspirators of the Gunpowder Plot (a brilliant display), passing on the way various poor souls on their way to meet their Maker by some of the cruellest punishments imaginable (boiling in water, or, if the executioner was in the mood, pitch: judicial drowning, where the victim was tethered to the river bank and left for the tide to rise-unless the rats got there first: flaying, whe
              re the victim was skinned alive: guillotining, by a heavy axe rather than the more efficient blade as favoured by the French: and the exquisitely cruel punishment meted out to traitors,hanging,drawing and quartering.) I can tell you, I was glad I hadn’t eaten…the exhibits are gruesomely realistic. York is reputed to be one of the most haunted cities in Britain, and in the Dungeon you will meet the ghostly lost Roman Legion…who disappear through a brick wall (wonderful special effects.) Finally, gaze upon the tortured body of St George, who was executed for being a Christian.The manner of his death was especially terrible. He was first tied to a cross and his flesh raked with iron combs, then nailed to a table and chained.he was fed poison, placed between two wheels, his body sawn in half before being decapitated and the remains cast into a cauldron of molten lead. (That just about finished him off!) If you like being scared witless, you will love York Dungeon, and even the most sceptical will be relieved to get back above ground. As well as being entertaining, the Dungeon is informative because the really scary part of it all is that everything you see really did happen. Talk about Man’s inhumanity to Man! I think we were over an hour in the Dungeon (seemed longer)and we went at our own pace..no-one hurried you along.Mind,you didn't want to linger in some parts. We arrived quite early in the morning,so we did not get stuck in a queue,but be prepared to have a wait at peak periods. I would not advise, though, anyone of a nervous disposition to visit the Dungeon, and it may not be suitable for young children (parental discretion here) I think the admission charge was £6.50 for adults (look out for special offers at times in newspapers - we had a 2 for 1 voucher.) There is a similar attraction in London - I’ve not yet visited, but hope to in the future.

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                20.06.2001 02:24
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                If you are visiting York make sure you set aside some time to visit the York Dungeon, especially if you have kids (not too young that is). The Dungeon, located conveniently in the centre of the city, is actually a museum of everything gruesome – from the plague to torture. Like I say the kids will love it! Upon entering the comfortably dingy and dark ‘dungeon’ you first learn about the plague and its affect on the people of York. And I thought it was just a hangover that caused disorientation, nausea and headaches – very nice. From there you learn about the lost Roman legion that was ‘seen’ by a plumber in an old house in York a few years ago. On looking into this phenomena historians discovered a Roman road did in fact once go through the location of the house – spooky! Posted on all the walls are little titbits of information and little known facts – I loved the one that pointed out that a still standing law allows a person, born in York, to kill a Scotsman in York with a bow and arrow and get away with it! Next comes information on witch hunting. Here, as in a few other parts of the dungeon, actors interact with guests and this all adds to the pleasure of the visit. The highlight of the dungeon is possibly the torture room. Having seen the endless possibilities of torture (from letting a rat eat you to dangling you in boiling water) I couldn’t help feel I would soon have spilled the beans had I been a prisoner. Next is the story of the Guy Fawkes and the gunpowder plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament in London. Fawkes was captured and lets just say he came to a pretty gruesome end. Finally another actor tells the story (concluding with a hanging) of the notorious highwayman Dick Turpin. The audience and especially the ladies have to call out to the highwayman before he will show up. This is done by shouting “We want Dick, We want Dick”. Think about that one for a
                little while.

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