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Siro Anzac Biscuits

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2 Reviews

Brand: Siro / Type: Biscuits

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    2 Reviews
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      03.11.2009 12:41
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      Buy them

      It's a team rule here that we have to have a constant supply of biscuits and we take it in turns to do the weekly biscuit run. This week one of my team mates bought in a pack of Siro Anzac biscuits which I had never had before. Apparently she bought them from Morrison's but having a quick search on Google showed me you can get them from most places Ocado have them priced at £1.05 for 300g so a bargain really. They come in a blue foil pack with ANZAC in red and white letters and inside the pack is a plastic casing that holds the biscuits in place. The biscuits themselves are similar in look to a Hobnob although a bit smaller in diameter. They are quite hard to bite through but in a strange way also a bit like toffee in constancy they taste yummy really buttery and oaty a bit like a flapjack actually they would probably be a good dunking biscuit although I haven't tried it myself! These biscuits also have a history. Apparently they were made using ingredients available during World War one by Australian & New Zealand women to send to the men on the front line to up morale. They then started to be used as a fund raiser for the British Legion and they still are today with 4% of the sale of these biscuits going to the Royal British Legion so I can dunk away in the knowledge that although they probably are not great for my figure at least I am doing my bit for those people out there who put themselves on the line for the sake of our country. The nutritional information is as follows per 100g Energy 2037kj sugars 33.8g Fat 22.7g saturates 15.4g I would recommend these they are tasty and send money to a worthy cause although I would avoid them if you have weak teeth!

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        13.05.2009 11:01
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        A Lovely biscuit for a very good cause.

        Anzac biscuits are presented in a lovely blue packet; a lonely single red poppy sits beneath the Royal British Legion logo as a reminder not only of the precious lives lost in wars long gone, but also of the continuing suffering of countless brave men and women, who represent peace and a hope that the future may be free of all hostilities. These delicious biscuits are available to buy in Waitrose for £1.05 for a generous 400g packet. They are made to mark a place and a time in history and by using some of the profits to benefit those who have given so much. Based on a legend dating back to the 1st world war when members from the first Australian Division and the New Zealand A Division were merged together to form The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) It is therefore fitting that these biscuits are made in Australia, from where they are exported all over the world. These soldiers invaded The Gallipoli Peninsular in turkey and many lost their lives in this dreadful conflict. Their loved ones baked these biscuits as sustenance for these brave soldiers many of whom died in their duties. Many of the biscuits were sold at home to help raise funds for the Red Cross too, and in a way it was something that loved ones could do to show their appreciation, and this is how these biscuits came into being. They only had simple ingredients then and so a simple recipe resulted. Today these biscuits are helping war veterans all over the world and my goodness they are a delicious way to help I can tell you! Inside the packet are 24 delicious chunky looking biscuits in two rows with a home baked coconutty aroma. They are made from flour, sugar, butter, oats, coconut, golden syrup baking powder and salt. No E numbers here, thank goodness, but some salt, but one biscuit will only give you 0.03g so not too serious. Each biscuit is only 63 calories so as long as you restrict yourself this is good news! So to the taste! Well I love them! Crisp biscuits which snap and release a lovely coconutty flavour which resembles a macaroon. They are the texture of a ginger nut with the wonderful taste of a coconuty and buttery hobnob. They are the closest thing I have tasted to the wonderful macaroons which they make in the lovely hill top town of St Emilion in France. These biscuits remind me of happy times I have spent there walking with the scent of freshly baked macaroons scenting the air above the cobbled streets, which wind and twist through beautiful ancient buildings with shuttered windows, which open into a world lost in time. For a commercially produced biscuit these Anzacs take some beating. They are suitable for vegetarians but not for anyone with a nut allergy. Incidentally I have discovered they make a lovely crushed base for a cheesecake with a difference and a crushed biscuit makes a lovely ice cream topping too. About 3% of the profit from the sales of these biscuits goes to help war veterans and so for me they are something I feel I would like to purchase on a regular basis. One of my relatives lost her husband in the Second World War and lived a lifetime alone as she was unable to find happiness with anyone else. So many stories and so much sadness.

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