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Snapz Parsnip Crisps

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1 Review

Type: Crisps/Snacks

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      23.10.2008 22:43
      Very helpful
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      5 Comments

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      Might satisfy the desire for a crunchy snack

      When I lived and worked in Bath, and popped into Waitrose to grab something for lunch (before discovering the joy and frugality of packed lunches, that is), one of my guilty pleasures was munching on a bag of Waitrose vegetable chips. Salty, sweet and no doubt laden with oil, they were delicious! They were also very high in calories and quite expensive, so I weaned myself off them!

      Last week at work a colleague brought in some of these individual bags of Snapz, the Beetroot flavour, and my eyes lit up. However, I soon regained control of myself and said I'd just have the one crisp, as I'm on a diet. On closer examination, a bag of Beetroot Snapz contained only 55 kCal and the ingredients list ran to only one item: you guessed it - beetroot! So I accepted an entire 20g bag, guilt-free. I'll be honest, they weren't as mouth watering as Waitrose vegetable chips, but as a healthy option they were very impressive.

      On the way home I popped into Sainsburys to get my own supply. I found the Snapz with the multi bags of crisps, there are 5 20g bags in a pack and they cost me £1.99. I decided to try the Parsnip variety, as I am fonder of parsnips than beetroot. On the pack, Snapz are descibed as:

      100% Natural
      Not fried - not baked
      Less than 3% fat
      No added salt or sugar
      Non-GMO
      Nut and gluten-free
      No artificial flavours/colours
      Vegetarian
      No sulphur dioxide
      Good source of fibre

      That is a lot for one small bag! In addition, each bag is made from at least 300g of fresh parsnip, so it counts as one of your Five a Day. I have to admit that I was slightly spooked by the "not fried - not baked" part - so what exactly have they done to these vegetables?! I can only guess that they have been dried to make them crispy. The resultant crisp is drier than usual crisps and very crunchy. The packet only refers to them being 'carefully selected, prepared and sliced and then made into chips without frying or baking'. Part of me thinks aliens must be involved but I'm sure that is paranoia.

      The Parsnip version that I am reviewing is 'with honey and black pepper', unlike the unadulterated Beetroot version. I'm surprised by this as I thought parsnips would be sweet enough on their own. The flavour is quite nice but I think I prefer the Beetroot ones.

      If you don't like vegetable crisps (and lots of people don't...) you are unlikely to like these. Even if you do, you are likely to prefer the fried version - but if like me you could do without the fat content of fried crisp and are on the hunt for healthy snacks you could do a lot worse than giving these a try. The packaging is definitely marketed at health conscious adults rather than kids, featuring a photograph of the vegetable and a freshly ploughed field on the packet I have. You could always have a go at persuading children to eat them as one of their daily veg though!

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    • Product Details

      Healthy, crispy snack.