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Tesco Rich Tea Finger Biscuits

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3 Reviews

Brand: Tesco / Type: Biscuits

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    3 Reviews
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      22.05.2013 12:22
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      A good biscuit

      When I joined Dooyoo, one of the categories I thought I'd probably avoid writing in was the food one, just because it's not something I personally read many reviews on before doing my Tesco shop. But, I feel I should review these Rich Tea Fingers (co-incidentally made by Tesco) for a few reasons, mainly because they're not at all what I expected!

      They're available in Tesco for 54p for a 250g packet and as I'm (supposed to be) on a diet, I bought these to have as a little treat when I felt really hungry as I understood Rich Teas would be a better alternative to digestives if I had to have one.

      I have a re-sealable box that I pop all of our biscuits into so when I got these home, I emptied the whole packet into the box which I might add keeps these fresh and crisp for weeks. What I was amazed by was their shape - I was expecting them to be finger shaped, which they are I suppose (although not in the Cadbury's fingers way), but I couldn't get over how slim they were, I'd say they are a third of the thickness of a normal rich tea biscuit, maybe even a little more. They are very flat and fairly wide at around 3cm wide, 7cm long. The size disappointed me a bit - I need at least three to be satisfied with my little treat in an afternoon. They have a fancy pattern all over with tiny little holes all over too.

      They are definitely not a biscuit that you'd dunk into your morning tea unfortunately - after a couple of seconds the whole thing falls apart and one of my real pet hates is biscuits remnants at the bottom of my cup so I have to eat these separately which is a shame.

      The biscuits themselves are very crisp, considering they are so slim. They break nicely when snapped and make that 'snap' noise. The taste though, well I'm not so sure. At first try I immediately thought that they were like cardboard with no taste whatsoever and very bland although some might argue that Rich Tea biscuits in general are on the bland side. Now though, after eating them a few times as a treat, I'm beginning to think they're actually very nice and they taste a little sweeter than I first noticed, although I'm not sure whether my opinion has been partly based on the fact that there's only 23 calories in one of these babies! There is an issue with that though. These are biscuits that you would never eat one of - three is my starting point and that's on a very good day. There are around 50 in one packet but on that portion basis the packet doesn't last very long (although at 54p I can't complain)

      These are good value biscuits although please don't expect these to be exactly the same as rich tea biscuits but in a finger shape as I did, these are completely different and are much, much thinner. They are nice though as a little treat, I rate them 3 stars.

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      02.08.2011 19:27
      Very helpful
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      1 Comment

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      Rich Tea Fingers

      A 250g packet of Rich Tea Finger Biscuits will currently cost you 54 pence from Tesco. They taste the same as your regular circular Rich Tea but they are oblong in shape with rounded edges or ends. The packaging is a bold blue colour and has an easy tear strip at one end to aid opening.

      This type of shape Rich Tea always reminds me of coffee mornings I would sometimes go to with my mother or grandparents as a child and they have a very pleasant sweet taste. They are very basic in the way they look and their flavour, they are not fancy or special compared to some biscuits or cookies on the supermarket shelves but considering their price and the fact that they are not marketed as brilliant I think they are great. They are crunchy but easy to bite and chew as they are fairly thin and definitely go hand in hand with a mug of tea. Even when dunking these in to a glass of milk they will go soft very quickly and so it is best not to leave them in your drink too long or they can break and leave a soggy mess in said drink.

      For people who love fanciful biscuits then these will probably not do it for you but if you like Rich Tea then these are recommended as I can't personally see there being much difference between these and an offering from a more expensive luxury brand.

      Nutritionally these are really great as each finger only contains 22 calories and 0.7g of fat so you could eat two or three at a time and not feel like it is having too much of a bad effect on you.

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        27.04.2010 20:20
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        12 Comments

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        Elongated Rich Tea

        Although 'Rich Tea' biscuits are a non-fancy and arguably bland accompaniment to a cup of tea, they're also quite tasty in a strange kind of way, and one inevitably leads to another. 'Rich Tea Finger' biscuits are similarly moreish, and are simply an elongated version of their rounded brothers.

        Price & Availability
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        The biscuits are currently priced at 48p for the 250g packet, and are available from the majority of Tesco stores throughout the UK.

        Appearance & Taste
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        Highly decorated with a patterned design running around their perimeter, the biscuits are golden brown in colour, and feature their name engraved into the top side. The taste isn't anything special, but it's pleasant enough with a mildly sweet and crunchy appeal. Unfortunately, when it comes to the old dunkability test, these biscuits don't really cut the mustard. Because they are so thin, leaving them in the tea for more than one second will often result in part of the biscuit falling into the liquid. I've often tried to fish the freshly-dropped biscuit out with another Rich Tea Finger - but then that usually falls into the tea as well, forming a rather annoying vicious cycle.

        Ingredients
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        The biscuits contain;
        Wheat Flour, Sugar, Vegetable Oil, Malt Extract, Partially Inverted Sugar Syrup, Salt, and Raising Agents (Sodium Bicarbonate, Ammonium Bicarbonate).

        Final Word
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        Although adequately tasty, we all know that part of a biscuit's appeal is its ability to be dunked in tea, and to be honest, Rich Tea Fingers just aren't good enough. The flavour is pleasant, but in future I'll definitely be sticking to the regular and reliable rounded Rich Tea.

        Nutritional Info Per Biscuit (5g)
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        Calories: 22
        Fat: 0.7g
        Saturated Fat: 0.3g
        Sugar: 1.0g
        Salt: Trace

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