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Judge Dredd vs Zombies (iPhone Game)

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    2 Reviews
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      21.07.2013 15:50
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      Very good game, and for free

      Hey everyone
      Today I am going to review dredd vs zombies on WINDOWS phone (its the same as the iphone version).

      Ok to start with, this is sort of a weird third person shooter where you play as Dredd, and well you shoot zombies. Part of me wishes that you would shoot "people" rather than zombies, but I get the feeling they made it zombies as if they showed all the green blood as red blood, then they would have to raise the age rating.

      Anyway, the controls for this game are actually really impressive. You use your left thumb to move on a virtual joystick. Whats really cool through is that the joysticks position can move, so if you want it in the top corner, bottom corner, whereever, you can do that.

      With your right thumb, you have 2 options, fire or reload. All aiming is done automatically but it can be over-ridden by pressing on the new target (e.g. oil barrels).

      The graphics of this are very impressive, especially when you consider that this game is totally free. I admit this is not the sort of game that you are going to be hooked on for hours, but its a pretty good game to play at bus stops and the like.

      There are 3 gameplay modes, missions, survival and PSI. Missions is a story mode, survival is what is says on the tin, and PSI is a weird way of earning things. You select missions (you don't actually do the mission), and you have to come back in a set period of time (normally 4, 8, 12, 24 or 32 hours) to claim your reward. Its actually the easiest way to earn credits in the game.


      When you do missions, you earn credits, which you can spend unlocking 2 weapons (there are 4 weapons total, the lawmaker mk2, the weird judge pistol thing, a shotgun, a sniperrifle and a grenade launcher which isn't that good). You can also spend the credits upgrading the weapons clip size, reload speed, damage and fire rate. Honestly I takes a long time to save up the credits to get these, but if you want you can spend real money buying credits, I however don't want to do this. You can also use credits to buy single use upgrades.

      Overall I think this is a pretty good game, and it is probably my favorite game on my phone at the moment. And considering its free, you can't really complain. This is one game to have a look at, or at least it is on windows phone. The only disadvantages are the having to pay for credits to get some of the upgrades, and a lack of online play (would have been nice to team up with a friend or something).

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      25.05.2012 17:42
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      Buy a cheap Amiga and a copy of Alien Breed instead

      If ever there was a game that does what it says on the tin, then it's the iPhone game Judge Dredd vs. Zombies. It might sound like a slightly odd mash-up of two different genres (or an idea for a really rubbish film), but somehow it works. Sort of.

      The plot sees MegaCity One overtaken by hordes of zombies. Isolated and alone, Dredd must take back the city building by building, clearing them of the Undead.

      At first glance, you could be forgiven for thinking that you've accidentally loaded up the old Team 17 Amiga Classic Alien Breed. The game is a top-down affair with the action viewed from an overhead perspective. Each level is effectively a maze that you must find your way around. Your goal in each level is to make your way to the exit, taking out the zombies you find along the way.

      Of course, it's not as simple as that. Some areas are blocked by locked doors and in order to gain access, you must find switches or other mechanisms to open them. This adds a simple, but effective puzzle-solving element to the game. Some of the scenery can also be used to your advantage. Stacks of boxes, for example, can be moved to reveal more ammo (your initial supply is limited) or health packs, whilst handy fuel drums can be shot to produce an explosion which (if used properly) can take out multiple zombies at once.

      At first, Judge Dredd vs. Zombies seems like it's going to be great. The graphics are good, with the top-down perspective providing a clear view of the playing area, whilst the cat-and-mouse tactics you have to play with the zombies adds a strategic element. The characters are well-designed and those from the comics are instantly recognisable. As you might expect from a game based on the Judge Dredd licence, it's quite violent, which for those of us with a slightly sick turn of mind is a Good Thing. Zombies explode in a pleasing pool of green blood when killed and, in a neat touch, you have to keep Dredd away from this shower of unclean blood or he will lose health. There's some nice variety amongst the undead graphics so that the zombies look different and have different abilities. All in all, this is a game which makes good use of its licence. The various levels are based around locations from the comics and several Dredd regulars appear throughout the game to keep 200AD fans happy.

      Sound is also very good with a variety of tunes throughout, including a simple, but effective one that accompanies the levels and generates a surprising amount of atmosphere. Sound effects are suitably meaty with atmospheric gunfire effects and a lovely squelching noise when a zombie explodes or Dredd is attacked. There is also the odd bit of speech, although these are not quite so good. Dredd sounds disturbingly like someone doing a bad impression of Sly Stallone from the naff 1990s movie, whilst an annoying plummy English female voice (possibly Judge Anderson) occasionally pipes up to warn Dredd to be careful (like you need warning!)

      Controls are kept simple and work well. Movement is operated via a virtual joystick in the bottom right hand corner which is highly responsive and gives you a strong degree of control over Dredd (essential, since you will often find yourself backed into tight corners and need to be highly manoeuvrable). A big, red fire button meanwhile, erm, you know, fires your weapon.

      Early levels are pure fun. The simple puzzle solving gameplay mixed with the zombie shooting give the game instant accessibility. It's immediately obvious what you need to do and how to do it - always the hallmark of a promising game. Whilst there's not a lot of variety between levels (they all essentially boil down to shooting zombies and making your way to the exit), that's not really that much of an issue to start with. The game generates a surprising amount of tension (there are some points where you know you have to go through a door, but know that as soon as you do, the zombies you can see on the other side will pounce on you). OK, so the slightly repetitive gameplay means it's a title you'll probably play in 30 minute bursts, rather than longer gaming sessions, but that's the sort of game the iPhone is best suited to.

      So, if it's that good, why does it only get three stars? Well, that's all down to one phrase that has been known to strike terror and dismay in the heart of every iPhone user: "in-app purchases". Yes, that bane of iPhone app raises its ugly head in possibly the most intrusive manner possible.

      The actual game itself (including all available levels) is completely free to download. However, the developers have been sneaky. Dredd relies heavily on the use of power-ups to upgrade your weaponry and ensure you are equipped to cope with the increasing hordes of zombies you will encounter on later levels. Money for upgrades can be earned in one of two ways: by playing though the levels (completing each level gives you a cash reward) or by using real money to buy virtual "in game money".

      Here's where we hit a snag with the difficulty level because the rate at which you earn money in-game does not come close to keeping pace with the incredibly expensive power-ups and you will soon find yourself getting frustrated as your woefully weak Judge is overpowered by insane numbers of enemies. Effectively, if you're not prepared to pay, you get to a point where further progress becomes all but impossible.

      This might not be such a bad thing if upgrades were available at a reasonable price - say 99p. However, the upgrades in Dredd are ridiculously expensive, ranging from £2.99 to £20.99. Yes, you really did read that correctly - £21 to unlock the ultimate upgrade pack. The need to constantly shell out to buy more and more in-game upgrades makes this a title that could seriously damage your wallet.

      The only way around this is to repeatedly go back and play earlier levels to earn extra cash. But to get anywhere near enough cash to make this viable, you need to play the same levels over and over again, which soon becomes very repetitive and boring. Sadly from a promising beginning, the later levels of Judge Dredd are nothing more than a cynical exercise in parting the gamer from their money. And that, in my book, is inexcusable.

      Unless you're prepared to pay a premium price to buy essential upgrades or spend hours of your life replaying the same levels over and over again, Judge Dredd soon becomes an exercise in frustration. Judge Dredd vs. Zombies is a prime example of a genuinely promising game being ruined by the greed of the developers behind it.

      (c) Copyright SWSt 2012

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