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Farrow's Giant Marrowfat Peas

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6 Reviews

Type: Peas

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    6 Reviews
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      18.01.2014 10:30
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      Lovely!

      Whenever I go shopping I like to buy fresh fruit and vegetables when I can. Living on my own though and buying sometimes for a couple of weeks a time it isn't always practical so I tend to buy fresh fruit and vegetables for the week and then I get cans of things for the second along with of course usually a bit of 'top-up' shopping. I usually stick to shops own branded things however when in Sainsbury's these caught my eye and I hadn't eaten a marrowfat pea in a very long time. I tend to buy mushy peas or garden peas so opted to have a change and had these earmarked for a fish and chip supper one night and you simply can't have that without peas! The Can: Well the can/tin holds 538g (330g is the peas as these are stored in water) and on the front of the can we are shown the peas and clearly told what they are and who they made by and then on the back of the can other information listed includes the ingredients and a full nutritional chart and how to heat them up and so on. There is no ring pull on the can however that doesn't personally bother me anyway. The Peas: These peas as mentioned previously come in water and are seasoned with salt and contain added sugar and mint extract. The peas are a nice dark green in colour and look soft enough without being mushy and you can either heat these on the hob and in a saucepan for a few minutes or bung them in the microwave and I did the latter cos I'm a lazy so so and they took about 3 minutes to heat through. I was pleased when cooked and drained that the peas didn't shred their skins (I hate that!) and they tasted really nice. They tasted like peas and were soft with no hard nasty bits and although they tasted a little sweet not too much so. I could also taste and smell the mint within them and I do not really appreciate that but its so hard nowadays to find peas such as these or mushy that don't contain mint and believe me I have searched high and low for those! These are suitable for Vegetarians and are naturally low in fat and sugar and for an 80g serving your looking at 80 Calories and 0.2 Saturated Fat which isn't too bad! All in all I really like these peas. They look nice, are easy to heat up, are nutritious but above all are simply a nice tasting, good quality pea! Available from all good supermarkets etc and I bought my can for 85p from my local Sainsbury's store This review is also posted on Ciao under this same username.

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        18.03.2010 16:22
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        Nutritious and convenient

        You can't eat fish and chips without peas and the best choice of peas here has to be Farrows Giant Marrowfat Processed Peas. Why are they called Marrowfat? Absolutely no idea but possibly from the fat Maro pea which was apparently introduced over 100 years ago by the Japanese. They differ from the so called garden pea in that they are green mature peas that have been allowed to dry out naturally in the field, rather than be harvested in their prime of youth like the normal garden pea. These are the variety of peas that make mushy peas. Are they better than garden peas? Apart from perhaps not so high in vitamin c as garden peas, I would say just different ,they are very soft and are best served with a dry dish that doesn't have any gravy or sauce as they are very moist. I personally wouldn't serve them with a roast dinner for example. Farrows stay firm when reheated gently (takes just a few minutes on the hob) and don't separate from the skins as I have known certain other brands to do. They can also be heated in the microwave but take care not to allow them to boil. They are a delicious, cheap source of fibre and protein and a handy item for the store cupboard. Ingredients Peas, Water, Salt, Sugar, Colours (E102, E133), Mint Flavouring. Nutrition nutrient per 100g Energy kCal 88 Energy kJ 374 Protein 6.7g Carbohydrate 13.8 g of which sugars 1.4 g Fat 0.7g of which saturates0.3g Fibre 5.9g Sodium 0.3g Salt Equivalent 0.6 g !00g tin easily serves 2 Price 40p 100g tin from Sainsbury's (same at Tesco and Asda)

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          27.09.2009 12:17

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          Morrisons have their value range ones at only 12p a tin!

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          17.09.2009 18:57
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          These are nice :)

          I am learning to cook more for myself as I get older but there are only a few vegetables I will eat and out of them peas are my favourites :) One of the brands we buy is 'Farrow's Giant Marrowfat Processed Peas' which are made by HL Foods in England. The tin I am reviewing is a 300g size with a drained weight of 180g. We bought these 3 for one pound at Morrisons but I think they are about 44p normally. The best before date is not until April 2011 so they last ages and the tin is recyclable with a paper label showing the big green peas that should be inside. These are advertised as low in fat and low in sugar and the calories are 71 per 80g serving, with sugars of 1.1g and fats of 0.6g. Farrows have added mint to flavour the water but it isn't strong otherwise I wouldn't like it; they also add sugar and salt and colours. They can be either heated on the cooker or microwaved and the instructions are on the back. The peas themselves are a nice green colour and they are quite big as you would expect. I found them to be quite firm which surprised me given that they re processed pea, but lovely with it and a nice accompaniment to a meal. Farrows peas are full of texture and very chewy rather than just melt in the mouth, the flavour is really satisfying too. Each one is a bit smaller than a 5p and pretty round in shape. Full of flavour and tasty, you can tell they are fresh and natural although it's not nice to think they have added colour to get the garden green shade... Four stars from me try them and see how nice they are! ;-p

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          16.12.2008 18:00

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          ive just opened a tin of farrows giant marrow fat peas and ive just thrown them in the bin , ive never seen such a mess , they were all shelled and out of the few that were not in bits they were all different colours from green to small black ones , i shall not be buying anymore .(disgusting).

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          09.10.2008 22:14
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          Much nicer than mushy peas

          COST: (@ 9.10.09): 27p for a 300g tin, at my local village grocers NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION (per 100g): Calories: 88 Kj: 374 Protein: 6.7g Carbohydrate: 13.8g - of which sugars: 1.4g Fat: 0.7g - of which saturates: 0.3g Fibre: 5.9g Sodium: 0.26g INGREDIENTS: Peas, water, salt, sugar, colours (E102, E133), mint flavouring OTHER INFORMATION: Suitable for vegetarians, can made of recyclable steel ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Who is old enough to remember the TV advert....."Sorry mate, you're too late - the best peas went to Farrow's" ??? This brand of tinned processed peas surely is a British institution, but I believe their popularity has declined a little in more recent times. Sadly, despite much thorough hunting, I have been unable to find any information as to when the manufacturer (HL Foods Ltd) introduced this line of grocery, but these peas have been around for as far back as I can remember - and that is in excess of 50 years. Farrow's Giant Marrowfat Processed Peas come in a can which hasn't yet graduated to having a ring-pull attachment. The can has an outer paper label. The larger area of the label is simply loads and loads of processed peas (that look rather delicious), and there is a black strip around the can which is larger on the rear. The front of the black strip bears the word "Farrow's" in yellow, and the words "Giant Marrowfat Processed Peas" in white italic letters. The larger area of the black strip on the rear of the can contains the nutritional information, ingredients and cooking instructions. On opening the tin, the very large peas inside are quite tightly packed, surrounded by a bright green liquid. The peas themselves are a rather synthetic-looking vivid green, and because of the high level of processing, there are often quite a few pea husks in the can which have detached themselves and gone for a swim in the green liquid. The smell of the product once the tin is opened, isn't a million miles away from mushy peas, though in my opinion tastes a lot better. The main bulk of the peas and surrounding liquid can easily be poured into a saucepan or microwaveable container for heating through, but there will be a wodge of peas stuck to the bottom of the can that need to be urged by a spoon into the cooking container. Part of the lump of peas adhering to the bottom of the can will have turned to mush, and once eased out and into a saucepan or similar, will blend into the green juice. This sounds revolting, but isn't really as bad as it looks. I think these peas are best heated gently, hardly stirring, and not quite brought to boiling point, as too much stirring and overheating encourages more of the husks to detach from the peas. I love Farrow's Giant Marrowfat Processed peas, and to me they are a great accompaniment to what some may view as possibly "plebian" meals - such as spam, peas & boiled potatoes or sausage, peas and chips. My favourite way of eating them is as part of a roast dinner - mixed with a little Bisto, a vegetarian Oxo Cube, a tiny tiny splash of soy sauce and meat juices, the juice makes a divinely tasty gravy. Just drain the green juice from the peas once they are hot, and stir into the gravy whilst it is cooking. These peas I believe truly are, like a lot of other "British Institution" type foods, something you either love or hate - and I love them. The intensive canning and processing seems to turn them into something that bears little resemblance to real peas, evolving into a unique item of food in a special category of its own (but having said that, I personally feel they bear more resemblance to real, fresh peas than canned garden peas do). The texture of the peas on eating is very dense, but soft and easy to chew, with an almost powdery, beany feel to them. There is also a very slight garden mint flavour present. Farrow's Giant Marrowfat Processed Peas are a brilliant and very economical source of protein, good carbohydrate and fibre - for me, the only down side is the "E" additives which I believe are there to preserve the almost luminous green colour more than anything. It wouldn't worry me if these peas were a duller green, as I'm sure they would still taste the same, but the intense colour can make an otherwise bland-looking meal appear much more attractive. Love or hate, I feel Farrow's (a subsidiary of HL Foods Ltd) produced a definite winner food-wise when they first began to manufacture these peas many, many, many moons ago. Some people may shudder at the very thought of them and feel they deserve a below zero rating, but I hereby award them a resounding 10 out of 10 !! Thanks for reading!

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          Vegetables