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Bell's Whisky

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8 Reviews

Type: Whisky

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    8 Reviews
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      14.12.2013 15:10
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      Forty Serves? I want a recount!

      Arthur Bell & Sons
      Edinburgh
      EH12 9DT
      Scotland
      - - -
      I love the Scottish, their passion, traditions, and their ability to recall a bygone era with great factual accuracy of Scotland's War of Independence in 1296 against Wallace's Kingdom of England. Being a Sassenach, I cannot possibly respond when googlies are sent down on a sticky wicket of this nature - "Thirty eears of war!" All you can do is stand and admire the historical wisdom of the Scot; applaud them and hope that is enough. Next year's Scottish Independent Referendum will remind Sassenachs of the rights of independence many times over - "We be Independent before, yee-no, we sun be agin!" My major irk of the imminent break up our great union would be the retail price of Scotch in the UK. I find it tough to recall history which dates back a time beyond Bells Scotch Whisky, the time-span is a total blur to me, almost insignificant, but for a Scot it is as clear as a 'bell' could've been done yesterday - now that is a gift. As a curiously spirited chap, I am a fan of Bells Scotch Whisky. Hark, I hear a disagreeable murmur from malt lovers who crave about the silky taste of 'Jamesons' - alas, I enjoy the 'shiver-my-timber,' rough, cheek wobbling sensation Bells manages to engineer; a result of three years in the making. 2 - 8 years is the generic duration of distillation.

      Here is the science bit: they say alcohol should be approached intermittently, consumed as often as going to church, unless you're a vicar of course - hence, why so many in days of old tended to consult the spirits, more so than it is healthy. They say there is a 40% AV (Alcohol Volume); when they say volume, I guess that Bells are referring to vocal volume after consumption. This is a good indicator of the amount of alcohol consumed, also why the brand 'Bells' meaning more than one - is an accurate measure of what vocal volume can be achieved, excluding inhibition - therefore, drink sensibly and moderately, such vocal disturbances could terminate an online reviewer's thought process. Singing at high volume at two in the morning... "'and the Bells are ringing out for Christmas Day;" in a cul-de-sac, it wakes and haunts the residence - whereby their cheeks wobble with ire and systematically emulate Laughton's hunched-back Quasimodo; "The bells! The bells!" As they wearily peer through the curtain crack at the howling fat cat bankers and accountants who've come from their Office Christmas Party. Arthur Bell & Sons are to blame, in brand only of course, since 1904 - after seventy nine years of perfecting grain and malt distillation.

      Smell: a combination of football club's changing room, a dentist waiting room and Lush retail Store, and an old tramp's breathe.

      Taste: spirited tangy fruity orange, Caramelised toffee with oatmeal undertones, lifted with a durable grainy malt that rest on the tongue, just like a feline curled up beside a roaring fire.

      Sensation: a fiery heat that warms anyone's cockles on a winter's night/day/morning (cross where applicable)

      There has been an occasion or two when I've indulged and tested my alcohol doggedness with a double Bell and found that my legs do not belong to me after getting off the bar stool. Evidence of Scottish foul play, perhaps; because your head is as clear as a bell and suddenly a look of a perplexed confusion sweeps across all Bells drinker's faces as soon as feet are called upon. You see Bells work bottoms-up - hence, where bottoms-up comes from, if you believe a true Scot, when I mean a true Scot, someone who say "wee dram" without measuring shot quantity - my favourite kind of Scot, indeed why I love them; Arthur especially. Alcohol watchdogs clearly (as a bell) state that debauchery acts comes from consuming too much - "I dishhagree " Bells stops you from doing anything mobile at all, too much has the tendency to numb your entire body - so for those who're off to their Office Christmas jolly, drink Bells till you're totally immobile, to the point parading and singing in cul-de-sacs is a mere dreamy aspiration.This is my Christmas wish; you know who you are - or maybe you don't!

      The Scots want independence to keep all of the whisky for themselves - helps to blur reality.

      40 serves equates to 17.00 GBP. Not sure what it is in groats.

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        14.02.2013 11:17
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        This is very nice whisky

        WHAT IS IT?

        Whisky from Scotland. It is made by Bells and is a blended whisky, that means it is made of different high quality whiskys all mixed together. Bells has been made since the 1800's and it is a very popular spirit.

        THE FLAVOUR

        Bells is a very nice whisky with a smooth taste and it is not harsh. It is not the sort of whisky that I would drink without a mixer drink but some people do, it is too strong tasting for me to drink it like that but when I add water or juice it makes it a lot more mellow and easier to swallow. I like the way it feels so warm as I drink it and I think it's a very good drink to have if you have got a cold or aches.

        WHAT DO I MIX IT WITH?

        I only ever mix my Bells with soda water because that is how I like the flavour. My husband drinks his without a mixer just with ice in his glass. You can use Coca Cola or other types of water, I drank it with orange juice for a long time but I do not like the texture of it like that now because I think juice makes it a bit top thick.

        WHAT I THINK

        This is very nice whisky. It warms me up and tastes so very nice that it is dangerous because it makes me want to drink more and more until I have had too much. It gets me drunk very quickly and the bad side effect is that it makes me fall to sleep so if I drink Bells I sometimes end up missing the end of the evening because I have got to go to bed.

        It does not give me indigestion like some whiskys do and it does not taste so strong that I feel sick after I have drunk it. It doesn't burn as I swallow it but I do get a nice warm feeling that is very nice. You can warm Bells whisky up and have it as a hot toddy but I dislike the smell very much when it is warm so I do not do this.

        ANYTHING ELSE

        Bells whisky contains 40% alcohol and costs £16 for a 70 size bottle.

        5 Dooyoo Stars.

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          24.10.2010 09:30
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          A nice winter warmer

          ==Bells Whisky==


          Whisky has got to be the first proper alcoholic drink that I tried and I was hooked from that very first taster! Seeing as mum and dad were big whisky drinkers (a couple a night nothing too excessive) it was a natural course that I would end up pinching a whiksy and coke and the first oppertunity. They used to drink Bells in the early days but then traded in for Famous Grouse which is a little bit nicer in my opinion.

          A bottle of Bells whisky can be picked up for under £20 and for that you would get a good sized litre bottle.

          Whisky is not just good for mixing with coke or lemonade, but also works to get rid of toothache but rubbing it onto the gums of the painful tooth. it is also a lovel winter warmer.

          When drinking whisky you really do get a lovely warm feeling inside your stomach and possibly a slight burn to your throat which is more pleasurable than painful.

          I find that branded whisky's such as this Bells are far better than buyign cheap immitations as they are smoother and less harsh to the throat.

          I can't say that Bells would be my first choice when buying a bottle of whisky but it is a close second to the Famous Grouse. I would sa however that being a whiksy and coke drinker lead me to being more of a Southern Comfort drinker when my order of whisky and coke got mixed up int he pub with So Co and since then I really haven't looked back.

          But as whisky's go, Bells is a good one and I would have to give it a 4 out of 5 stars and a high recomendation.

          Many thanks for taking the time to read

          I do hope that this has been of some help/interest to you.

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            07.06.2010 19:02
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            Beats Jack Daniels and Jim Bean to hell!

            I am not a huge drinker of Whisky, but have recently acquired quite a taste for this stuff. My granddad used to work in the Bells Factory as a boy up in Scotland, so maybe it is my Scottish roots coming through, who knows!

            When i do drink whisky, it has to be Scotch, or at a push Irish. I can't abide Jack Daniels or Jim Bean, they just taste so synthetic to me.

            Bells is a blended whisky which has a full and satisfying flavour. I am by no means a whisky connoisseur, but I find it to be a really flavoursome and invigorating drop.

            Traditionally you would drink whisky neat, with water or, at a pinch, with Coke. While working in the states I tried a cocktail which comprised essentially of Whisky, cranberry juice and Agostino Bitters. It sounds horrendous but is surprisingly good. Simply mix equal quantities of whisky and cranberry juice over ice and add a dash or two of bitters, job done! I don't know what it's called (or if it even has a name) but I would definitely advise trying it. It is especially good when made using Bells whisky.

            As I said, I'm not into whisky in a big way and only ever drink it rarely. When I do I always find myself opting for Bells when available. Try it in a cocktail or neat on the rocks.

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              28.05.2009 16:41
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              Not a good drink at all

              Hmmmm, I have reviewed several of my favorite whiskys recently. And so I thought, hmmmm, what about Bells. It is after all the first whisky I ever tried when I was about 16. Maybe this is the reason why it took me another 5 years to actally start drinking whisky!!

              Well this is marketed as the leading blended Scotch. Which it is. You can get Bells in any pub in the country, it's for sale in all the supermarkets, and it's a massive name. But why is it so popular?

              I assume its the price. You can pick up an 8 year old bottle of Bells for just £13. A bargain? Well to be honest its cheaper to wee in a bottle! And the colour, smell and taste are all the same! Bells is not a nice drink, yes it's whisky, yes its strong, and yes you can pretty much guarentte what your getting. BUT...

              If you do like whisky, try a single malt. They may often be double the price but they are well worth it. You drink Bells and you get a burning sensation and then it just leaves your mouth numb and feeling rather abused. When you drink a good single malt you get all the flavours gently caressing your mouth. There should not be a burning, but a soothing warm glow. A complete contrast to what bells has to offer.

              To be fair, if your into Whisky and Coke, or Lemonade etc... maybe Bells is the right choice as it does not really matter too much. Or if you have stumbbled into a pub on a cold January night, then a hot toddie made with Bells might be just up your street. But if you just want a whisky, why would anyone drink this!

              Overall would say Bells is really not a good drink. It spoils everything about whisky, and lets the side down. There are other blends out there which are far nicer, and this would really be bottom of the pile in my opinion! There are plenty of other versions of Bells which I can only assume are far better. Maybe you should decide for yourself on this one!

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                29.08.2002 02:36
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                I Must declare my partiality, Bells is my blended whisky of choice it has been so for more years than I care to remember,perhaps if I increase the intake I will not remember. My first encounter with this my life time companion was when I won a bottle at a tombolla, I was thirteen at the time so promptly hid it from parental gaze and smuggled it back to my boarding school. A few days later it was discovered and confiscated and locked away never to be seen by me again I thought. Some years later at a school reunion we were reunited and the headmaster and I enjoyed its company for a brief spell. In the Uk  Scotch Whisky is no longer as fashionable as it once was, many reasons have been put forward for this but none seem to stand up to scrutiny. If  whisky has declined in the UK it has more than made up for it on the continent in recent years, being the drink of choice in every nightclub from Antibes to Zurich. Strangely our continental neighbours seem to favour brands mostly shunned in the UK and it can be difficult to find our good friend Bells in much of the world. One bar owner went so far as to import it especially for me in Antigua. The choice of brand is very much a matter of personal preference, to me Bells is smooth but to someone else it may seem harsh, just as their brand may appear rough to me. Although Bells is a blend you can appreciate the flavour of the fine malts used in its "construction". The Bells company can trace its history back to 1825 when Thomas Sandeman of the famous port importing family started a shop in Perth he later took Arthur Bell into partnership. The Bells blend was introduced in 1896. Bells was taken over some years ago and is no longer an independent distiller but the quality remained unchanged. So if you have time buy me a Bells afore ye go! and leave those whiskies to the foreigners.

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                  28.08.2002 23:17
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                  When you want to order a whisky in a bar you are presented with a myriad of options. In an ideal world you would take "a trip round the optics" but usually its a straight decision between the "Malts" and the "blends". You would only be reaching for the Malts on special occasions so it looks like you will be heading for the blends. In most pubs you have a blistering array of Malts on offer and maybe 3-5 blends (Bells, Grouse, Teachers, W&M, maybe a cheapy faux Scots hypermart special like "Glen Kilty" etc). What tends to happen to the uninitiated is that the barperson dictates choice (ie which is the bottle least likely to need changed) so he'she may say "is Glen Kilty ok?". My point here is to avoid the forced choice or the embarrassment of the question "which one". So, here i am recommending that you ask for a Bells (it's 95% always there), why? - because its the best and easiest drinking "draught" whisky around, and probably the best made. Its not as harsh as a lot of belends and is best drunk with some water or on the rocks. Impress your friends by asking for a Bells, ask for a few more and the sounds of bells will soon be ringing in your ears, ask for several more and it will be sirens. Its a bonny drink.

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                    22.02.2002 04:16
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                    A-ha, this’ll shock you! KarenUK writes about something that isn’t an Avon product nor do I mention Pop Idol or Will Young once. Oops. Apart from then ;-) BELL’S SCOTCH WHISKY Now, most people who have written in this category are fans of whisky, not me. I rarely drink alcohol and if I do, my choice of tipple is Bailey’s or a nice cheap white wine like Lambrusco Dell'Emilia. (My daughter, Emilia, is named after a gymnast, not the wine!!) But when I get a sore throat, I turn to the whisky bottle! I have tried almost every throat medication you can think of and nothing is as effective at easing a sore throat than whisky! This means I don’t drink whisky for the enjoyment of the taste, so I usually buy cheap stuff. However, this week when my throat was bad, the cheapest we could get from the local Spar was this one – Bell’s Scotch Whisky at a mere £4.50! Of course, parting with that much money is enough to make me cough, but it does work. Even I have heard of the company Bell’s, it has apparently been around since 1825. It is made in Scotland – hence the term Scotch whisky – see, I catch on quick! The bottle I bought contains 20cl and is a whopping 40% alcohol, so keep it well away from the kids! This particular whisky is, according to the bottle, eight years old. The label boasts of being ‘smooth blend [which] contains the finest examples from the four whisky producing regions of Scotland’ and explains these are ‘matured in oak casks’. I guess this explains the high price. They describe the taste as ‘a fruity oatmeal’ and ‘a fresh sweet toffee’ but I can’t see this at all. The whisky is a dark orange-brown colour, which would look at home in any hospital sample bottle. It smells of very strong alcohol and it tastes like fire with a kick. I have been told that single malt whis
                    ky is usually of a higher quality than blended ones like Bell's. Maybe if I drank other, more expensive brands, I might prefer whisky - but as this opinion is about Bell's, I'll continue to hold this view on this particular brand. I can’t ever see myself being a whisky drinker for pleasure, but it does have its uses. Besides being great for gargling with when you have a sore throat, it is lovely in other drinks. I know you can mix it and have whisky and water or whisky and coke, but personally, I love it in coffee. When mixed in this way with coffee, it is also good for your throat as it is hot, and the kick is slightly reduced, making it a more pleasant drink and less of a ‘needs must’ situation. If you add it to milky coffee, it is absolutely gorgeous and yes, the combination of the milk and whisky do help you to sleep. So whisky isn’t all bad, despite my protestations. It does have its uses. But as a drink of choice? No, thanks. I’d prefer a cuppa ;-)

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                    Scottish Whisky