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Sierra Tequila Silver

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£11.95 Best Offer by: thewhiskyexchange.com See more offers
4 Reviews

Type: Tequila

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      05.02.2013 15:31
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      perfect in a Margarita, not so perfect as a Slammer!

      I have to say that I'm really not a Tequila fan at all. My husband is though and so that's why we always have a bottle of Tequila in the house.

      The main reason that I'm not a Tequila fan is that I was forced to drink far too many Tequila Slammers by a very excitable bride to be on her Hen Night. I was her Chief Bridesmaid, and so she figured that it was my duty to drink as many Tequila Slammers as she did. Personally I thought that it was my duty to ensure that she got home in one piece, and so I did palm quite a few of my Tequila Slammers off on some of the other Hen Night guests. However I did end up drinking more Tequila Slammers than I wanted to, especially considering that I don't even really like it!

      I really dislike Tequila neat - as in a Tequila Slammer. However I do quite like Tequila in certain cocktails, I do especially like Tequila in a Margarita. I like to make fruity Margaritas in the blender using Tequila, lime juice, lots of frozen fruit, ice cubes, and then maybe another spirit such as Cointreau or Triple Sec - depending on the type of frozen fruit that I've used. This makes a lovely slushy fruity Margarita and is best served in a Margarita bowl. In fact we have a few Sierra Tequila Margarita bowls that we've got free when purchasing bottles of this Sierra Tequila.

      Another reason that I like to buy this particular brand of Tequila is for the little red plastic Sombrero hats that come attached to the tops of the bottles. I'm collecting these and I'm going to attach them to a string of fairy lights and make a string of fairy light Sombrero hats. I already have quite a few strings of red chilli fairy lights strung around my kitchen and so I figure that adding a string of red Sombrero hat fairy lights will just add to the kitchness! My husband however just shakes his head when I tell him this plan!

      So onto the Sierra Tequila Silver, Sierra Tequila Silver is a clear tequila. According to the bottle ''its full, fruity, fresh aroma, which is dominated by light chilli notes, is a reflection on the Agave tequilana Weber azul and the light notes of green apples and young pineapple. Nuances of pepper give Sierra Tequila Silver that certain something, making it a tequila that is full of character.''
      Silver or 'clear' Tequila is un-aged and bottled or stored immediately after distillation, or aged less than two months in stainless steel or neutral oak barrels.

      To be honest I can't really taste any of this in it, it just seems to be a fairly unpleasant firey burn (if drank neat) if you ask me. However once I add this Tequila to a cocktail or a Margarita then it does seem to really enhance the cocktail with a fruity alcoholic kick.

      Sierra Tequila Silver is 38% ABV, and it typically costs around £15 for a 70cl bottle in major supermarkets if not on offer.

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      22.10.2012 22:12
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      A rather fresh tequila more suited to cocktail making

      I have in my time taken numerous alcoholic shots consisting of various alcoholic liquids and although I don't go out of my way on a night out to take a shot sometimes when I am with the girls it is nice to let my hair down and have a bit of fun. However, house parties is generally where the usual culprits such as tequila and Sambuca rear their ugly heads.

      One such tipple that appeared at my birthday BBQ in the summer was Sierra Tequila Silver. I have seen the brand bottle before with it's famous red sombrero top and have previously bought a bottle a few years ago for a Mexican themed party but it isn't something I'd buy on a regular basis. Sierra do a range of tequilas and all of their products are produced and distilled in an area called Jalisco in Mexico.

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      Tequila
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      Tequila is the national drink of Mexico and is produced under strict Mexican rules. Sierra is one of the largest producers of tequila and they use the Agave tequilana Weber azul which is the only type of agave which can make tequila (it is closely related to aloe vera) to create their tequila. The plant is grown in rows and looks like tall, green strips of very thick grass.

      Like a lot of products Tequila is only proper tequila if it meets the criteria of the Consejo Regulador del Tequila ('CRT'). This was brought back many years ago by the Mexican government to protect the alcoholic drink and to save it from poor imitations.

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      Packaging
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      Sierra Tequila Silver comes in quite a distinct bottle. It is made of clear glass with is rectangular in shape and although it has a screw on top it is covered with a little plastic red sombrero. On the front there is the red and yellow themed label together with the product name and Sierra logo as well as an image of a desert plain with a cactus and a Mexican with a guitar. There is the percentage info as well as product information on the back.

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      The Tequila
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      The drink itself is clear in colour and water like in consistency. The Sierra Silver Tequila has a very distinct aroma just like most other tequilas. It has a sharp aroma which is a little softer than a paint thinner! Tequila has a very noticeable aroma which is quite similar to Sambuca but Sierra Silver Tequila has floral notes too.

      The tequila has been distilled twice to give purity and is a well rested drink. This particular tequila is known for its fruity and full taste which has been carefully mixed with chilli and pepper. The chilli notes is from the Agave tequilana Weber azul and is teamed with the fruity notes from green apples and pineapple two items I never would have put with tequila.

      To drink you can of course drink it straight. The only way I have ever done it this way is by a shot and even then I find it quite a strong almost potent mix. One that warms your throat and makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. It certainly is an acquired taste to drink it straight and it isn't one I overly enjoy. However, mixed as a part of a cocktail and it balances it well as it provides the fruity notes together with a bit of zing.

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      Recipe
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      In order to use up all of the tequila left over by my party I opted for the very easy and well known Tequila Sunrise recipe:

      2 Measures of Tequila
      2 dashes of grenadine
      Orange Juice

      Simply pour the tequila in the glass together with the orange juice in a tall glass with ice then simply add the grenadine.

      A simple drink which is light, refreshing and full of flavour.

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      Overall
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      I would never normally go out and by this tequila. Personally as part of a cocktail I find it perfectly drinkable and enjoyable. Yet drank on its own I find it has quite a potent flavour which I don't find particularly pleasant as it is just too strong with a paint stripper type quality (not that I have ever had paint stripper!). A tequila I would probably recommend as a cocktail mixer but not one that should be used on its own. 4 stars from me.

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      Useful Information
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      Brand: Sierra
      Availability: Supermarkets, office licences
      Volume: 500ml
      Price: £13.00 - £14.00
      ABV: 31%

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        25.09.2009 21:20
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        Enjoy, in moderation!!

        Hmm I don't think Ive ever met someone who has gazed longingly at a cactus and thought....wow, that would make an awesome drink. And there's probably a reason.

        Since I became a real ale drinker (moving to Yorkshire has a lot to answer for), spirits have come a lot further down the list of things which make a good night out. However, having recently been given a bottle of tequila by a workmate, I feel compelled to try and enjoy it...!

        Tequila, if you haven't guessed, is made from agave, a cactus type plant. It originates from Mexico and usually has an alcohol content similar to vodka, at around 35-40%. And it tastes like paint stripper.

        I'm really not a fan of neat tequila (a messy night at the tender age of 16 made for this), however you can mix it to make more palatable drinks. A margarita is probably the most well known way to incorporate tequila into a cocktail, and involves adding tequila to triple sec and lemon / lime juice. I can't afford the extra ingredients at the moment, but you can take it from me than tequila and cloudy lemonade with lots of ice is pretty good as well.

        Sierra tequila usually costs around £15 for 500ml. When you first open it, it smells...well like a very strong spirit, but as a unique, indescribable smell. It tastes ok, maybe slightly like liquorice, but is very strong, I'd recommend mixing it rather than doing shots!

        A shot of tequila contains around 100 calories, so mixed with diet coke = pretty diet friendly...!

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          11.04.2003 19:57
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          History Mmm Cactuses. Aren't they great? The plant that keeps on giving... umm.. prickliness? Well actually yes, often they are prickly but occasionally, and in the case of the Agave plant, they aren't. Well not very. I'd say they are more, spiky. Perhaps, and this is a big perhaps, that is why tequila is thought to be made from cactus, but in fact the Agave isn't a cactus at all its actually more closely related to the lily! Tequila was first created, by the Spanish. Ah those intrepid Conquistadors, they bought us so much! Tequila was brewed by the Spanish to replace their diminishing supplies of brandy. That might strike you as kind of odd as the Conquistadors rarely created anything new, sure they introduced many fine things to Europe, but as for new stuff... not a sausage (the creation of the first sausage is another op altogether!). The answer you are searching for is that the Aztecs had already invented an alcoholic wine from the heart of the blue Agave plant. The Spanish in all their wisdom decided to further distil this product to produce what would eventually know as tequila. Despite it's creation in the late 1500's it was another 200 years before, due to various forms of prohibition from the Spanish king, it was allowed as a marketable export product. It was 1795 when Jose Cuervo finally gained the first official license to produce tequila. But we won't talk about him here 'cause he makes the other tequila that I'm not writing an opinion on. Mexico has several laws regarding the proper production of tequila; for the most part the law governs that no less than 51% of tequila can be made from the juice of the Blue Agave. Though you'll only ever find tequila made from 100% blue Agave in Mexico itself, bought in Mexico you'd find your tequila has various controls and labels such as the NUM and the DNG. NUM indicates the unique number that signifies which distillery produced it <
          br>and DNG stands for Direccion General de Normas, much the same as the Appelation Controlle label you might find on a bottle of French wine. There are three main types major types of tequila; Blanco, the unrefined and unaged. Silver, is more refined, as it gets a filter before bottling, but still unaged and provides a much fuller flavour of the Agave plant than the blanco, and finally Repasodo or Gold which is allowed to rest in Oak Casks, in some instances old bourbon casks, for two years before bottling. Personally I'd recommend your average Joe go for Silver, Gold isn't always a better product. Occasionally its just poor silver tequila with a hint of yellow colouring to make it appear better! During investigating tequila I was stunned to learn that in the U.S. you can pay up to $120 for a bottle! Quite a comparison to the £12 to £15 price you'd expect to pay here and one might say that those commonly available are unlikely to be anywhere near to the top of the range. The Actual Stuff So, Sierra Tequila is most distinguishable. I suppose the most noticeable feature is the little red sombrero that can be found acting as a lid. The clear bottle itself is shaped to look like a Mexican, head and shoulders clearly defined with fine detailing that lends the air of a poncho. It's somewhat difficult to establish exactly where Sierra Tequila originates from. The bottle itself says it is a Mexican tequila, the website www.sierratequila.com indicates that the company are German, and the product details on the Tesco website say that The Drinks Company Limited is its manufacturer (they are English based but don't appear to have a website. This is something of a contrast to Jose Cuervo tequila which most certainly originates from Mexico. But does any of the matter? Many of you will have tried tequila shots, as I recall it was one of the first methods my mates and I employed to get obliterated on a Sat
          u rday night; youngsters today have it easy with their most palatable After Shock. We'd be standing at a bar, with a dash of salt and a slice of lime ready it would be Salt - Tequila - Lime. This tradition derives from the early days; salt is used to reduce the fiery kick, lime to dampen the taste of the alcohol. Tequila, much the same as many spirits, is something of an acquired taste. I feel it is worth mentioning here that often a tequila shot is misrepresented as a tequila slammer, well this just isn't the case. A tequila slammer is a slightly longer mix that includes an additional 4cl of sparkling wine. Slam - Drink. Well I must say in comparison to my recent exploits with JC gold I found Sierra Tequila far more palatable. Though I'd knocked back several tequila shots I?d used most of my JC to pep up a Margarita mix I'd been buying, and even then it was still quite rough. The addition of salt and a slice of lime did little to improve the after taste. Sierra on the other hand provides a rather less harsh shot, full of the peppery taste that you'd expect from good tequila. It has a much lighter, less musky smell and has a vaguely whiskey-ish quality to it, probably the oak casks! I found with Sierra Tequila I could dispense with the salt and lime, such need to diminish the devilish flavour isn't necessary as Sierra is far smoother. As a shooter it is definitely fiery. The liquid, downed in one, barely touches the taste buds but the resulting swallow hits the stomach and spreads nicely into a decidedly hot finish. As a mixer; well as you either know, or have probably gathered, tequila is the major component of a good margarita. Along with Triple Sec (or Grand Marnier) and lime juice. Personally I find the idea of using two fairly expensive liquors to produce another somewhat disturbing, particularly in the pocket area. To such end I usually buy Fat Sams Margarita (another op again) and use tequila to give it a little m
          ore zing. Sierra adds a great flavour to Fat Sams, providing more body and a greater alcohol vibe. This is as far as I've gone, though I'm tempted to get hold of some grenadine and produce a few Tequila Sunrises. Even though Sierra is good, it still isn't a sipping drink. I don't recommend that you take a tumbled full of the stuff and drink it like you might a good cognac or whiskey. Sierra is a good clean tequila that is definitely a good way to get your self drunk. Unlike another spirit (that shall go unmentioned) I've heard of very few people getting angry on the stuff. This would indicate that it will make for a highly sociable drink. I have found, on times drunk with friends, that we've all got quite giggly. Warnings It doesn't take a lot to get you drunk. Three, maybe four shots, will elevate your alcohol levels way over the legal driving limit, in fact I should think two shots would take you to the driving limit. Sierra, as with all tequilas, is fast acting; I'd expect a shot to reach my head within a few minutes. Taken as a chaser with beer it will most certainly elevate you to heightened levels of drunkenness. As a chaser it isn't too bad, it doesn't maintain the malt essence that you might get from a whiskey, though the flavour isn't so opposed that your next sip of lager (I haven't tried it with bitter or ale) will leave you licking your sleeve. I find drinking Margarita an exceptional way to become inebriated, I've drunk an entire pitcher without getting too sloshed, though getting into the open air often reveals that your level of inebriation is much higher than you might have previously expected. It either gets to you quick or creeps up on you like a lame boogie man (I'm a little concerned that this analogy might be difficult to get so, in other words.. slowly but with a real scare at the end!). Too much will most definitely see you producing a grea
          t technicolour yawn, and it doesn't taste fantastic on the way back up. It will almost definitely give you a hang-over. The Worm This might disappoint some, but in fact tequila never had a worm in it. Mescal, produced from an entirely different Agave plant (not even the same species) did have an Agave worm added. Mescal is often thought to be derived from the same plant (peyote cactus) that produces mescaline which was popular during the 70's as a hallucinogenic narcotic. You can see where I'm going with this can't you? Conclusion In closing I'd say that Sierra Tequila provides a more subtle alternative to its harsher cousin. But any differences may well be lost on most. NON MEMBER NOTE - If you got this far and you'd like to comment or write your own opinion, why not sign up? It only takes a few moments and DooYoo maintain a strict privacy policy which means no SPAM!

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          Made by The Drinks Company Limited