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    12 Reviews
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      07.11.2012 10:25
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      a good ball

      ==Squash Balls==


      I used to play a fair bit of squash when I was a member of my local leisure centre last year and would take full advantage of the membership fee that I was paying. I became quite good at it although never managing to beat my other half when we played. I bought myself a racket and a few squash balls so that I wouldn't have to borrow the really rather rubbish supplies that the leisure centre loan out.

      There is a dot system when it comes to buying squash balls ranging from the blue dot for beginners which gives a slower bounce, a black one for a medium level user and then the yellow dots which really are for the people who know how to play as these have a far quicker bounce.

      I bought the yellow dot balls mainly because these were what we were always using when borrowing the balls from the leisure centre so I was already used to the speed at which they handled. I was able to pick up a tube of three of these Dunlop squash balls from my local sports and model shop or a reasonable price of £5.99p. I am sure you could get them cheaper were you to shop online so it is worth having a look around.

      The squash balls are basically a golf ball sized ball made of a black rubbery type of material. They have the Dunlop logo on and of course the yellow dots. They feel hard to the touch and not especially bouncy when first got out of the tube. However the idea is to warm the ball up with a bit of hard use and the more it is used the softer it will become and the bouncier it will get. So before each game a simple process of smashing the ball continually against the squash court wall to get the ball nice and ready for the game is a necessity.

      These balls do last quite well and I think I would generally need to replace them every 6 months or so with playing rather sporadically throughout that time. Therefore I think for the money that they cost you are getting a good squash ball that it made to a high standard and works really well.

      I think the Dunlop balls that I have are well worth a tops core of 5 out of 5 star rating and a high recommendation!


      I do hope that this has been of some help/interest to you

      Many thanks for taking the time to read

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      30.10.2012 19:42
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      Choose wisely and look after your balls.

      In the years that i've been playing squash i have come across some pretty bad, and pretty good squash balls. The cheaper non branded ones are usually very poor quality and tend to break, crack, and show signs of wear almost immediately.

      But choosing a good quality ball is just the start of it, choosing the right ball for your level of play is also a massively important factor, here's what you need to know:

      Orange: Pointlessly slow.
      Double Yellow: Slow, good to start with. About right for casual players.
      Yellow: Medium, a good step up.
      Red: Faster, skilled players will benefit. Big jump up from yellow though.
      Blue: Insane, used in championships. Professionals will benefit. Stupidly bouncy when warmed up.

      Now i personally started squash with a double yellow, which is slow, yet effective. The orange ones are ridiculous, even beginner players don't need them, they just make the game very boring and whilst you can keep up, by about 5 hours total play time you end up wanting to get the double yellow or even yellow ones, you really don't need to keep them that long.

      I have used a blue ball before and if you've never played anything higher than single yellow, it seems like a bouncy ball. In fact, a bouncy ball would be slower than this. Blue balls (sorry) are used in championships and by professionals, their speed is exceptionally high and even the slightest of errors can cause the ball to end up wildly out of control.

      Caring for your balls requires regular cleaning and taking extra care not to flatten them, so they don't crack... yes. On a more serious note you should clean them regularly and if cracks start to appear this can affect the effectiveness of the ball.

      You may notice the bounce it once had is lost or the speed is much slower. The ball looses energy quicker with damage, and eventually they break completely. Once they're cracked, they're no good and its a very short time before the completely falls apart. They're not that expensive, just buy a new one.

      Squash balls constantly hit the sides of walls, the ceiling and therefore end up leaving most of their rubber on the paint. The logo's will wear off very quickly but it's when they get really thin that you need to replace them. Uneven balls will also not play well and if you get the badly made ones this will happen very quickly.

      Choose wisely, your choice of brand and colour will determine how you play and how long they will last. Beginners i strongly recommend the commonly found double yellow. Not only are orange ones hard to find, they're just... awful really.

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      13.07.2012 12:51

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      Back in the day when I used to exercise ( way, way back), squash was one of the games I regularly played with my family and friends. It was competitive which I loved and I usually won, which I loved even more! Because of this though, I was the only one who really loved to play. Other people would often get frustrated and want to play tennis which they could then beat me easily with. So this is why I was always the person to buy the rackets and squash balls. I often bought them from the gym shop just before a game. They wouldn't last long around my house as my brother would find it amusing to play golf with them in the back garden.

      I usually bought them in large packs so that they are cheaper. Usually 10 for £15 or something along that price range. They always seemed overly priced however, they wouldn't break easily however hard you hit them and would probably last a lot longer if my brother wouldn't knock them over the edge of the cliff.

      They provide a consistent bounce well to help you play and are supposed to be non marking. This is hard to back up seeing as the wall usually covered in black dots. However, they help a good game so would suggest you give them a go.

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      25.03.2012 12:53
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      A great ball for a great sport

      Squash, not the drink, the sport, is something I have enjoyed for years, when I was in my teens back in Ireland every weekend my friends and I would go to the local sports club where they had a great squash court. We always only played in pairs never doubles as that would just end up in a mangled mess on the floor.


      Squash is played in a hard four walled court, it is not a slow paced game, quite the opposite in fact. If it is played with gusto it can be an adrenaline fueled, heart pumping workout. The balls used in squash are far softer than tennis balls and for good reason. If you were to get hit by a tennis ball at the speed one of these balls ricochets off the wall you would not enjoy it, believe me. Squash balls are hollow and made from rubber, this design is perfect for the required bounce necessary for the speed of the game to be guaranteed.


      Not all squash balls are the same however. The thickness of the rubber used can vary and there are slow balls available that are used by more experienced players. The slow ball design is actually harder to play with in my experience. It doesn't bounce back as well and more effort is required. The colour dot used on the balls will inform the player or buyer of the balls bounciness.


      A ball with a blue dote is perfect for beginners and that is exactly who it is aimed at.


      A ball featuring a red dot will have a good bounce and medium speed and is suitable for when you start to become comfortable with the sport.


      A White dotted ball is a mid range ball with medium bounce and speed, if you were to start by using this ball you may find it harder than it need be.


      A green dot on the ball is pretty much the same as the White really with medium bounce and speed. I can see no difference between the two.


      This ball like the one pictured above, has a single yellow dot and that means it has a low bounce and is slow. This is the stage I got to before we all went our separate ways. This single yellow dotted ball is hard work as it bounces off the wall but you need to go towards the wall once you hit to ensure contact as the bounce will not send it flying directly back to you like it would with the blue or the red dot ball for example.


      A double yellow doted ball is slow, some consider it average speed, but not me I would consider White to be the mid range ball. But as I said I never progressed to the two dot yellow stage and it's around six years since I played.


      An orange dot on a squash ball is the top of the pack, it is the black belt stage if you look at it that way (as your performance improves you move up the ranks by changing balls and climb the colour coded ladder of success).


      I played with this orange ball the very first day I tried squash at the age of sixteen and it was exhausting. It was like hitting a bowling ball around the court. It is extremely slow and the strength needed to play with this ball was too much for me. Of course this was a practical joke being played on the novice teenagers by the older guys at the gym but we thought this was what it would feel like to try and play a game. Thankfully it wasn't and when we did get our hands on the beginner ball it was like hitting a marshmallow around the court when compared to the orange.


      Squash balls are well made with a soft, durable finish and a vivid dot that is easy to see from a far. They have a quality feel to them and most importantly a good controlled bounce. But the quality can depend on the brand purchased. As with most things there are inferior products available that wouldn't last ten minutes but cost a lot less. Squash balls do tend to split and can suffer quickly from wear and tare but as I said this isn't a gentle, slow paced game however this will not happen as quickly if the ball is well made. Squash balls are put under a lot stress and abuse and this is especially the case if they are communal balls supplied by a gym like it was in my case. On the one occasion that my parents did buy me a pack / tube of these balls there was twelve in it and ten of them must be still sitting up in my attic along with my racket wondering where that energetic young man has gone.


      Writing this review has made me reminisce about the good old days. But I think I will leave this sport in the past where it belongs. I fear if I was to get back in the court I would be obliterated by my teenage opponent and have to go back to my baby blue beginner ball. So to avoid that "tail between the legs situation" I will continue to get my daily workout here writing reviews.

      Thanks for reading :0) 2night

      The price of squash balls varies from store to store, so do shop around.
      Argos is selling a pack of three double yellow dotted balls for £5 but there are packs of twelve for £20 so as with most things the more you buy the less you pay.

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        04.05.2011 19:21
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        Quality squash ball

        Nowadays there are a plethora of squash balls available to the public at their local sporting goods store. They come in a dizzying variety of colours and sizes, leaving the majority of people looking dazed and colourblind when in the squash aisle.

        The different colours on a squash ball refer to the 'speed' of that ball and how it realtes to it's bounce. Balls with less bounce are for playing a faster game when compared with those with a large bounce. This review will focus on the Dunlop Pro Series squash ball with two yellow dots.

        The double yellow dot ball is the competition standard ball used in all major championships around the world. It has the least bounce and hence is the fastest squash ball available to the general public. Some stiffer balls exist for playing in areas at altitude but these tend to be few and far between.

        The Dunlop Pro Series comes either as a single ball or a tube of three. Larger packages are available but they tend to just be multiples of the smaller sizes. Despite the professional stamp and tournament affiliation these balls should be no more expensive or hard to find than any other size. In reality most shops only carry the blue, red, single yellow and double yellow editions of the Dunlop Pro series. Typical price is about £3 a ball and £7 for three. Price breaks exist for higher numbers so it's worth bearing in mind if you're purchasing for a club or a large group of players.

        Like any squash ball the Dunlop Pro needs to be warmed up prior to play. Most players accomplish this by hitting it off the back wall a number of times on their own or in a rally. Usually 5 minutes or less will leave the ball warm enough for proper play. When compared with the higher bounce balls the Dunlop Pro seems to heat up quicker, perhaps due to the change in the rubber format.

        Longevity is not an issue to the casual player. I have had the same double yellow ball for 4/5 months and I have seen no need to replace it. That said, a competitive player who goes for a game 3/4/5 times a week will obviously require one in a shorter space of time.

        Overall there is little to say about this squash ball other than it performs it's task perfectly. It is as cheap as any of it's competitors and has the added bonus of affiliation to the world's largest competitions and competitors. A point to be made is that if you play with this ball in your local club the chances are that at any given competition you will be playing with the same ball, so you will avoid any surprises.

        Thumbs up.

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        28.02.2011 17:38
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        A strange ball for a top game

        Squash the sport for the super healthy and those who love hitting a ball at a wall, it is also strangely a non-Olympic sport whereas other racquet sports currently are such as badminton, table tennis, and tennis. Considering most Olympic sports tend to be associated with the gentlemen's clubs of the late 19th century this omission seems a strange one as squash has always been popular.

        Anyway on with the specific review, squash is played in a rectangular box with a wall and enclosed sides, it is played between 2 players (though pairs is possible) and is usually first to 9 or 13 scoring only on serve. The game requires a ball, and the squash ball comes in a variety of types. This makes squash unique amongst ball games in that the choice of ball is as important as the choice of racquet, other ball sports have a standard ball but squash has a variety with a degree of softness from soft to very hard. Each degree of change is denoted by a small dot of colour on the ball; the ball itself is about 40 mm in diameter and is easily pushed in with thumb and finger. The ball itself comes as a 'cold' ball and requires a degree of warming before the ball behaves in a manner allowing a dependable and playable bounce.

        Spots before my eyes

        The most important aspect of the squash ball is the little spot of colour on the uniform blackness, the spot denotes the softness, with the softer the ball the harder to hit as the bounce is lower and more prone to variability. The current tournament is a double yellow spot which is both very soft and very hard to hit, there are others. I've never played with the double yellow or the even rarer orange ball which is I'm led to believe for high altitude games but I have played with the other ball colours.

        Most players play with the green, red or blue coloured balls which slide from medium to fast in terms of flight through the air and height of bounce. To be honest at an amateur level it's hard to tell the difference between say a blue and a red ball but the green ball does repond a bit slower and is a bit harder to play.

        Squash balls cost about £3 and it is recommended to wash your squash balls after use as they do pick up dust during the game, they do last so an initial outlay should keep you happy on court for many months or years.

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          26.02.2011 12:15
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          Great sport with a good system of balls

          Squash, for those of you who don't know much about this sport, is a racquet sport that is played by two players (or four players if you're playing doubles). It is played in in a four-walled court (often from my experience with one of these walls being made from glass so or with a balcony above the game so that someone can watch the game and check for cheating and such). The ball used in this sport is small, hollow and made from rubber.

          As this review is about squash balls in particular, I shall give you some generic details on what squash balls typically are. Squash balls are between 39.5 and 40.5 mm across and weigh 23 to 25 grams. They are made by gluing two pieces of rubber together to form a hollow sphere (or ball!) which is then smoothed down to make a matte finish. Different balls are provided for varying temperature and atmospheric conditions and standards of play, for example the more experienced players are likely to be using slow balls that have less bounce than the balls typically used by less experienced players. This is because slower balls tend to simply stop in court corners, rather than bouncing back up to allow easier shots to be played. Depending on the way the rubber has been put together and the thickness of the rubber, a squash ball has the property that it bounces more at higher temperatures. Small coloured dots on the ball indicate its level of bounciness, and therefore the standard of play for which it is best suited. The recognized speed colours indicating the degree of dynamism are as follows:

          An orange dot indicates that the ball is super slow (therefore requiring a bigger force to make it go as far as other balls) and has a super low bounce as well which means that it won't bounce as far as the other balls either, again meaning a greater force is needed to make it go as far. This ball is ideal for play in areas with high altitude.

          A double yellow dot indicated that the ball is slow, but not as slow as an orange dotted ball, and has a very low bounce, although it will go further than the orange dotted ball does with the same amount of force. This ball is currently the one which is used most frequently and is seen as the 'average' ball. This ball replaced the previous average in 2000, this being the single yellow dotted ball.

          A single yellow dotted ball is slow and has a low bounce, meaning that it was ideal for being used as the average ball before double yellow dot came into play. It wasn't too fast and didn't bounce too far which meant that players still had to work for the game point without having it practically delivered to them on a plate.

          The green or white dotted ball is considered to be average because it has a medium/slow speed so there is still some work to be done to reach the ball but not as much as before and it has an average bounce.

          The red dotted ball has a medium speed and bounces high which means that it is ideal for people who are not exactly beginners but aren't exactly experts at the game either. Basically, this is probably the ball that could be used by children once they have been playing for a while because they are unlikely to be able to make it from one side of the court to another fast enough to get the ball if one with a slow bounce was used as it wouldn't make it back to them.

          The blue dotted ball is for complete beginners, having a fast speed and a very high bounce. This means that the ball will basically come back to the player and go wherever the player is trying to get it to go without too much of a problem. This ball can be good for warming up as well, doing a rally with just one person if you wish to simply practice some shots or something along those lines. Again, this ball is good for children because of the speed and bounce.

          I believe when I first started playing squash I played with a red ball and then progressed to green a month or so later but I can't be entirely sure as I was quite young at the time (I think about 6 years old?). I found it quite hard though because I was one of the youngest players there playing against adults and teenagers which was quite hard at times. I think having started with a red ball did help me quite a bit though.

          There are many different companies which produce squash balls, including some well known names like Dunlop, Prince and Wilson. I believe the balls I used were Dunlop or Wilson however so I can't be entirely sure about the quality of any other types of balls from other companies. In the time I've been playing squash I've only ever had 2 balls fall apart in play and they were pretty worn when in play so this probably explains why this happened. I think I've only had to buy about 10 packs of balls in the whole time I've been playing as well so this suggests that they last a long time. The main problem I have with balls is that they tend to end up going over the balcony and then kids steal them before you get a chance to get up there to retrieve the ball. This is just typical of the court I play at though. Of course I've had to buy different balls with different bounce and things like that as well though so this wasn't the only cause for needing more balls.

          Last time I bought a set of balls I believe they cost me £9.99 for 12 balls which I don't think was too bad considering how long they seem to last me. I play fairly regularly as well so I think they're worth the money every now and then.

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            09.01.2011 09:08
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            Squash balls: what to expect..............

            If you're looking for a great way to exercise, losing weight while improving your dexterity and reactions and really going for it while having fun at the same time, then there's not really very much that can beat a good game of squash. You're under the exact same limitations as your opponent, and you even have the same court space, bar the serve. I find that a good game of squash is excellent for a workout and it makes you feel really good after playing it, giving some of those muscles you wouldn't normally use a workout.

            What I love about the game is the fact that the pace of it can be somewhat controlled by choosing what sort of ball you play with. Squash is played in a walled court that is quite small, and the idea is to hit the squash ball against one of the walls in between two horizontal lines. Then, as with tennis, your opponent is allowed a maximum of one bounce before having to do the same, with you being subjected to the same rules. The game can get quite frenetic, especially if you haven't played before. It's therefore useful to be able to start of with a faster ball, meaning you're more likely to be able to get to it before it reaches its second bounce. The slower the ball, the faster YOU have to go to get to it. After all, if it goes behind you, there's always a chance it can bounce off the back wall and you can then hit it, something that faster balls give you more of a chance to do.

            So how do you know whether a ball is faster or not? Well, there's a colour coding system in place, using a tiny dot on the surface of the dark and squidgy squash ball. Each colour has a place on the speed chart, and you can get super fast balls as well as super slow ones. Competition balls (official standard competition balls) seem to place nearer the middle of the spectrum, allowing a slow enough pace to provide a challenge while keeping enough pace so that the super skilled and professional don't kill off each point too quickly.These balls have two yellow dots. The colour coding system will then change depending on what sort of speed ball you're looking for. Most brands will conform to the colour coding system, so it's easy to work out exactly what you're looking for. At school, we used to use the fastest balls for training to start with, and then move up the order to play with slower balls to improve our skills a bit more. You'd be surprised just how much difference there is between the slowest and the fastest.

            Once you've got your squash balls, though, it's not simply a case of launching straight into playing. The balls are small, maybe a couple of inches in diameter or thereabouts, and are squidgy. Their rubbery bounciness relies a lot on friction, and you have to warm the balls up to make sure that you're getting the full bounce potential out of them. Balls are always warmed up before playing, and this is also a great way of warming up and practising yourself. As the balls warm up, you get a feel for their pace, and this then gets you set for playing.

            A quirky little thing that I like doing is having a variety of different paced balls at my disposal, and it's quite fun to have the option of a different paced ball each time you serve. What this does is make your opponent have to be more aware of the pace of the ball they'll face, giving the server a bit more of an advantage. It also adds a different dimension to the game, one of a bit more concentration and cautiousness instead of being confident in the speed of the ball you're playing with. Like any racket sport, the rules and limitations can get somewhat frustrating, so I like to throw in a bit of difference with this.

            In terms of which balls to get, I have yet to find a dodgy brand. Some well known sports brands will obviously have the edge, market leaders Wilson and Dunlop having the mostg popular brands. Depending on what sort of quality ball you want, and also what speed of ball you're after, prices can vary from a few pounds for a ball to £5 for a box of three. I think the more you buy, the cheaper they work out per unit. On amazon, you can get a dozen for around the £20 mark at the moment, which seems a good bargain.

            rarely will you have a squash ball split on you, but bear in mind that after a while wear and tear on the ball will affect its performance. As long as you're aware of it, then you'll have no problems, and getting new balls luckily doesn't break the bank. Start off on a fast paced ball before then settling in and finding your comfort. And go on, give the multi speed ball option idea a go to add an extra dimension of concentration to the game, and let me know how you get on.............

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              05.01.2011 21:01
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              Go for Dunlop

              I've played the game of squash for the last three years, and find It to be an incredibly effective work-out. Unlike golf, where the ball plays only a small part in determining a player's performance, the squash ball is an extremely important factor in deciding the outcome of a game. This is because certain squash balls have a lower bounce than others. The balls used by beginner players are very bouncy, whereas, the pro-standard balls have a low bounce, giving the player less time to return the shot. So how do you know which squash balls are right for you?... luckily there's a dot and colour system in place.


              Varieties of squash balls: the dot / colour system
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              Beginner squash balls are blue in colour (often known as the 'Max' if manufactured by Dunlop) and are slightly larger than the balls which are available for more seasoned players. Next up (in the UK at least) is a little black number known as the 'Progress' ball - like the Max, this particular sphere is nice and bouncy, but not quite as large. Following on is the standard 'Competition' ball with its a single yellow spot - this is significantly less bouncy than the Max and the Progress, and is aimed at the intermediate player. Finally, there's the 'Pro' ball, which has a double yellow spot and is the least bouncy of the lot. I normally opt for the latter, as I feel it makes for a more exciting game with less time to think.


              A bit more about the ball itself
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              The standard squash ball has a diameter of 40mm and is made from rubber. Dunlop are the world's premium manufacturer of the squash ball, and seem to have a monopoly on the market. To be honest, i've only ever used Dunlop squash balls - firstly because they are the best, and secondly because many sports shops only sell the Dunlop variety! There are other manufacturers out there however, and if for some reason you can't get hold of a Dunlop ball, Wilson balls are arguably regarded as the next best thing.


              Warming up your balls
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              It's common practice to "warm" the squash ball before you start a game - and this is because it only reaches its optimum level of bounce when it becomes a certain temperature. The warming process is simple enough - you just hit the ball against the far wall until the bounce is of a consistently acceptable level. In winter, it can take quite a long time to get the ball up to speed if there is a poor heating system in the leisure centre - even the most bouncy of squash balls won't be especially easy to hit unless it's had enough warm up time.


              So how much do squash balls cost?
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              You can currently purchase a three pack of Dunlop's Pro Squash balls for around seven pounds from amazon.co.uk - and, both the Competition and Progress balls are available for a similar price. Wilson's three pack of squash balls retail at £7.50, although as I previously mentioned, my personal preference is Dunlop. The beginner Dunlop Max ball can be bought on it's own for £3, or in a pack of three for £7.50.


              Squash Ball Longevity & Final Word
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              In my experience, i've found that Dunlop's squash balls will last between three to four months before they need replacing - of course this also depends on the amount you play, and how hard you hit the ball in the first place! Normally, a small split will appear somewhere on the ball, resulting in a lower than usual bounce which should be instantly noticeable. At the end of the day, your choice of squash ball will result in how much you enjoy your game of squash - so it's important to buy the correct ball for your own level of play. I highly recommend the entire Dunlop range, which I have found to be reliable and cost-effective.

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                02.01.2011 19:03
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                A great game

                I have been playing squash on and off now for about 18 years, although I have never played regularly, just perhaps 5 or 6 times each year, as and when I can fit it into the general rat race of life!

                I was introduced to the game by my Dad, who used to play every week for a number of years, and often used to come home with a huge bruise on his body - sometimes even on his face where he had been hit by a squash ball!


                The equipment needed for a game of squash is pretty simple, and it is relatively cheap to get hold of.

                First of all you need a squash court to play on, and these are found at most leisure centres, and can be hired for as little as £2 for a session during off peak periods, which when split between the 2 players is pretty good value for 40 minutes of non-stop energetic action!

                Another piece of kit needed is a squash racket. Squash rackets are very similar to tennis rackets, but they have a much smaller head, and have evolved in a very similar fashion from the small wooden headed rackets to the larger and lighter graphite or titanium rackets.

                The final requirement for a game of squash (other than the players ) is a squash ball.

                Squash balls are small round balls composed of a rubber material, which are 39.5 - 40.5 mm in diameter, and weigh between 23 and 25 grams (see the picture at the top of this page).

                These balls are soft and can be squeezed a little, but due to the rubber design they need to be warmed up before they bounce properly. This warming up procedure usually consists of a few minutes of the players whacking the ball around the court to warm it up, or alternatively holding it under a hand dryer in the change rooms to speed things up a bit.

                The balls have coloured spots on them, which identify the bouncing qualities of the ball.
                This is designed to suit differing levels of players, with new and inexperienced players using a nice bouncy ball which will sit up well, and give them plenty of time to get into position to hit the ball and decide on the shot they need to play.
                Experienced and good players tend to opt for a less bouncy ball which has little bounce when it hits the floor, meaning they have to anticipate the exact position of the ball, and be quick enough to get to it, and hit it instinctively without much time to plan their shot.


                The coloured dots on the balls are as follows:

                Blue - Very High Bounce

                Red - High Bounce

                White - Average Bounce

                Yellow - Low Bounce

                Double Yellow - Very Low Bounce

                Orange - Super Low bounce



                I remember starting with a blue spotted ball when I first started playing, but soon moved through white, and on to yellow. For the last 10 years or so I have used double yellow, but a few months ago when I was playing a game with my brother, a ball came into our court from the court next to us, and we were both utterly amazed by how much it bounced. It was a blue spotted ball on further examination, and I think it is just a simple case of players getting used to the bounce of the ball that they are used to playing with.

                Squash balls vary in price, but I paid just £3:99 for a pack of 3 Dunlop balls (double yellow spotted) just before Christmas from a sports shop inside the Potteries shopping centre. A ball does last for a while, a few years perhaps, assuming they are not lost, or stood on while playing. Squash is a great game, which requires skill, speed, and agility and it works all sorts of muscles in the body, often meaning that it is difficult to walk for a few days after a game due to all those aching muscles!



                Thanks for reading.


                © L500589 2010

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                  20.09.2010 15:44
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                  energetic sport

                  Squash is probably my favourite sport because it tests you so many levels. A good game of squash will test your speed, with you dashing across the court for forty odd minutes. It will also test your agility, to see if you can be nimble and reach for those tricky shots. Also, your strength and endurance will be put the test, as the game will require power serves to knock the opponent for six. This is the part I like the most! The game does require some equipment, a raquet and a ball to play with, then you are good to go.

                  I have used a range of balls in my time on the courts, though I do favour the Dunlop brand. You can buy a pack of six for just over the ten pound mark, which i consider good value for money. The balls are colour coded, so you can choose what type of game you will be playing. Generally red and yellow dots on the balls will signal the speed of the ball.

                  The Dunlops balls are tough, rubbery and durable and last for a long time. After a year or use, they barely tear and all you can see on the balls are smears and the odd indentation or two, this does not inhibit gameplay, but it is wise to change balls when they start getting very tatty.

                  The balls take about ten minutes to warm up and you can do this on the court by whacking them with force or you can warm them up in a changing room under a hand-dryer. When you have done this, you will find your balls are bouncy and the gameplay will be faster and more fun.

                  The Dunlop range are well packaged in a tube and you can also buy them individually if required. A definite must-have for a beginner or a pro player.

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                    05.07.2008 18:40
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                    good brand, well worth the money

                    Right then, in order to participate in a game of squash you basically need two items; a squash raquet and a squash ball. When purchasing your squash ball/s it is paramount that you do not get ripped off as there are some stores out there that are seemingly too eager to grab you precious money. If you are a beginner and are wishing to purchase the Dunlop progress squash ball then obviously these balls are dearer than normal squah balls as the have to be made larger and thicker so as to bounce considerably more so as to attain correct teqhnique.

                    There are three types of squash balls, you have the begginner ball which then progresses to the one dot ball and then the two dot ball. The beginner ball is larger and extremely more bouncier than the other normal balls, but once the novice player has mastered their teqhnique they will find the one dot ball a huge shock which hardly bounces in comparison. The two dot ball is the best as it presents you with an incredibble work out and tests your reflexes.

                    By all means purchase the Dunlop Progress squash ball if you are a beginner but for the more experienced players it would be wiser to purchase your dunlop balls from sportsdirect.com which offers great online prices. Such as three Dunlop revelation squash balls for £2.99. My local gym charged me around £2.50 for one measly ball when i had forgotten to bring mine.

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