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The City Ground (Nottingham Forest FC)

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The City Ground is a football stadium in Nottingham, England, on the banks of the River Trent. It has been home to Nottingham Forest football club since 1898, and has a capacity of 30,576.

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    7 Reviews
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      17.03.2012 11:24
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      A ground which was good but needed to offer much more

      Football is my favourite sport in the world so when I can I love to go and watch it live with a friend of mine who supports Nottingham Forest. This season I have been to six games at the City Ground and I thought it might be nice to share my experiences and what I found when I was there. ~~ Who are Nottingham Forest? ~~ This perhaps is a bit of a silly question to give someone who loves football because Nottingham Forest are a very respected and well known football side who play at the City Ground. Nottingham Forest are perhaps best known for winning the European cup but not only that having a very determined and in some people's eyes a world class manager who went by the name of Brian Clough. They have had some fascinating players in the past such as Roy Keane, Teddy Sheringham and even the current England interim manager Stuart Pearce. They have won the league on a few occasions and have accomplished many awards throughout their history when they were established in 1898. ~~ Getting There and Parking ~~ Nottingham is a big city and getting there can be a very easy challenge usually the best route to get there is travelling on the motorway and because the M1 goes past there it becomes a very good place to get to. In terms of arriving via train this is not a trip I have taken but I have heard it is a very good ride there and quite cheap. One downside in taking the motorway north bound to get there is the traffic which in a major city is obviously going to be there so that is something you should expect. Parking is perhaps the biggest worry for fans either away or home fans. The stadium is situated near the River Trent so you have a bridge which crosses the river and on the one side is the stadium and the other side is the fierce rivals named Nott's County. Parking on the opposite side of the bridge is good because the council allow you to park in different places for a cheap price usually about £4 or £5 for the match day which is fairly good. If you want to park down side streets you can but be aware some do have little signs indicating you can be charged a fine. At the stadium parking is available but this is at a cost. The price to park your car at the stadium is £10 and your car is pretty much protected by plenty of staff who are there to escort you into the car park and out again. You pay the fee as you try and enter the car park at the stadium the one drawback is when you have to leave because you need to leave in single file and it can take a while to get out. If you are someone who parks across the bridge this also is going to take you a while to get out but also to walk there as well. Overall the parking is one of the best I have seen and to me the prices are nothing to worry about especially if you want to keep your car and valuables safe and sound. ~~ The Stadium and Eating ~~ The stadium from the outside looks pretty modern and one of those you might see in the Premiership because it offers a very vibrant style. On the outside the corners of the stadium are missing so you can take a view on the inside. The seats are red and white to match the home kit of the football team and they have four stands which is kind of the norm in most stadiums. You have the away section to the one side which is kept away from the away fans and the rest of the stadium is used for the home fans. Total capacity of the stadium is 30,600 which are pretty good but unfortunately I have never seen it full yet and the maximum I have seen is 24.585 which is not too bad. The stadium is terms of seating is superb they offer very good spacing between the rows and if your near the front your protected by the sponsor boards but a very large 5 foot type brick wall so if the ball does bounce is wont necessary hit you. The stadium however on the outside where you visit the toilets is pretty horrible and outdated. The toilets are very open in that if someone from the opposite sex walked past they could take a look very easily. They have some television monitors around but the overall effect is pretty poor. The turnstiles are annoying also outdated. If you were someone who was a bit bigger in terms of weight you would struggle to get through in previous football stadiums I have visited they have electronic systems to let you in and out which this stadium does not offer. In terms of place to eat and drink this stadium has a luxury of places to go. You have around this stadium tones of places to eat from fast food, to sandwich bar and pubs. The drinking areas are more limited so that is a slight issue but for food places there is plenty there. Prices are slightly higher at the stadium and if you go inside a simple hotdog can cost around £4 which for me is very expensive this is without a drink so the prices at the stadium are more expensive compared to the streets surrounding the stadium. ~~ Atmosphere, Staff and Stores ~~ You have at this stadium the very small but essential stadium store. This is situated around the one side without a sign there to give you guidance. You have to travel around the stadium in search of the store which is annoying and when there on a match day the stadium is packed so is the store. The staff are pretty much there to talk to but at times can seem to be a bit silly in their behaviour. An example might be if you want help with a seat there is no one around most of the time to assist you. If you need to look for a seat your pretty much on your own. If you have a problem in the stadium such as a fan that is annoying you then you need to go searching for staff or stewards because they are nowhere around to be found so again this is a very frustrating issue to have at a stadium. The atmosphere at the start of the game is very loud but not on going as you might expect. Some teams when they have a home game they seem to sing throughout the game and give out encouragement I never felt that in any of the visits this year to see them. I have also found that at times the home fans enjoyed taking the mick out of the away fans more than focusing on the match itself. I found some of the fans hard core where they would want to shout at the players and sometimes really went at it with the verbal insults as well. I think the staff need to be more visible and approachable when you need help finding a seat because when you arrive inside the stadium the signs can be misleading when you need to find out where you are. ~~ My Visit ~~ I first went to see them play in August against West Ham United which was on a Sunday afternoon and the atmosphere was amazing to start with but soon turned to a bit of a silent library when they were losing. I think the day began well the journey was pleasant and parking was very simple and to be honest the fans outside the stadium were very polite and friendly and seemed to have plenty of banter amongst themselves. We did go and get a bite to eat which is where we discovered the insane price tag attached to the various items they had for sale. In total for a cup of tea and a hot dog it came to £7.45 which is madness and even though it is a football club the amount you pay for a ticket should help reduce these prices. When entering the stadium it is where I noticed the problems with the old fashioned turnstiles and the attitude of the staff and because my friend and I had never been before we needed help on the whereabouts of our seats. We did go and get a bite to eat which is where we discovered the insane price tag attached to the various items they had for sale. In total for a cup of tea and a hot dog it came to £7.45 which is madness and even though it is a football club the amount you pay for a ticket should help reduce these prices. We were told to follow the signs which we did but they took us the wrong place and it became very annoying when it comes to you needing to find your seat but the staff unwilling to assist you. Before we went to sit down we took our time to find out where the toilets were and to be fair they offered very little space and enough room for about 20 people to go to the toilet. I think the small and the way the toilets looked were disgraceful at best. Once we had settled we managed to see the game sitting down. I mention this because so many stadiums now people pay for a seat yet they have to stand up because of the people in front standing up so fortunately at this ground you can remain seated. When half time reached they had some boring entertainment which is what they have done at every game I have been to and this is a few fans aiming to kick a ball through a hole in a piece of wood and they get a few attempts each. The second half began and there is a few things missing in the stadium and one is a huge screen to help with the viewing angles. If you're at the front and the ball is the opposite side of the pitch in the corner you can really struggle to see the action so perhaps if they had the huge monitor in the corner of the stadium it would assist in the viewing pleasure. At the end of the game leaving was pretty easy and getting out of the car park took a short amount of time but overall we were out of Nottingham within an hour and that was pretty good for a weekend game at the start of the season. I have since seen them face, Reading, Leeds, Doncaster, and Middlesbrough all at home and the same sort of situations have arisen and this has been problems with the staff and there unhelpful attitude and behaviour towards the fans who need help. In terms of how well the games have gone I would say the seating was good there is plenty of leg room and space between seats so you're not all stuffed together and also the fact that you have got a good view of the pitch from most of the seats you have got a good chance of viewing the game. I paid £30 for this ticket at West Ham but during the midweek fixtures the prices can range from £20-£25 depending on the team and where you're sitting. ~~ Final Thoughts ~~ The stadium location is a great one and the car parking for the fans is fantastic. I would say this is the best parking at any stadium I have been to for a long time. The way the stadium is situated on the river makes finding it very easy and also the way the motorway is right outside the city makes finding the location also very easy. Food and drink are easy to find but make sure you do this outside the stadium as once inside the prices are very high and can end up costing you a small fortune. The stadium offers good car parking and has got plenty of comfortable seats with good leg room but the staff in my eyes offer very little in terms of manners and helpfulness. They seem more occupied watching the game then assisting the fans who pay their wages. The toilets need a good scrub and offer more security in terms of privacy which they haven't really got. I think the turnstiles are very old fashioned and if you're in a rush to get to your seat it could be a problem due to how long it takes to get people through on time. In terms of the atmosphere there is some but during the games I have seen this year there isn't enough there to cheer the team on with. After 10 minutes the crowd goes silent and offers very little in vocal support even if the team scores or wins. Overall the stadium offers basic facilities but could offer so much more with a stadium which has a big turnout and makes plenty of cash. ~~ CLUB INFORMATION ~~ Website: www.nottinghamforest.co.uk Ticket Office - 0871 226 1980 Address - City Ground, Nottingham, NG2 5FJ

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        19.05.2009 19:30
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        3 parts of a great stadium

        The City Ground, home of the once European Champions Nottingham Forest, is a place I hadn't visited until a couple of years ago. That was until the fallen giants got relegated to Coca Cola League One and faced my team, Doncaster Rovers. I have to say, upon their relegation, this became the away fixture I just had to go to and I most certainly wasn't disappointed, well with most things but not quite all. The first thing you notice on entering the area is the complete lack of parking options around the ground and this has led me to go on the supporters coach for the last few visits. Once parked up though, you can't help but be impressed by the setting. The stadium is situated beautifully next to the River Trent and to get to the away end you need to walk along the main stand on the Trent bank. It is a lovely view and puts you in a good mood. However, that mood changes somewhat as you enter the stadium. I appreciate that elements of the stadium are old fashioned, but you do expect certain standards from a concourse and seating arrangement and I am afraid that the City Ground fails on some of those. I can obviously only speak for the away end, as the home ends may be much better, but the concourse is just ridiculously old and narrow. It is in desperate need of a refurb and making wider too. We didn't even fill it to capacity and there was hardly any room to breathe in there before the game. The arrangements for getting some food and a drink were very old and tired too leading to really long queues and increasing irritance amongst supporters. Once through the tunnel and into the stand, you are instantly greeted by the prospect of trying to sit in a seat that has little or no leg room of note and this is magnified if you happen to cop for one of the corner seats. It is a tight squeeze to say the least. The tier above is full of home fans which is a little un-nerving and possibly shouldn't be allowed for what is a local derby and has become a bit of a grudge match as we have gone through the divisions together. The actual stadium once inside is beautiful and oozes Premier League, even if the team doesn't. The Trent End and the main stand opposite the dug outs are terrific and creates a good atmosphere as they keep the noise in and offer good acoustics. This is definitely a ground I love to visit but I do wish the away end would have some work done on the interior.

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          24.03.2009 23:53
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          Certainly more Championship than European Cup

          The City Ground is home to Coca Cola League Championship side Nottingham Forest and is situated beside the River Trent, approximately a 15-20 minute walk from Nottingham city centre. It is easily accessible from the city centre and from the train station, given that buses 6-11 will take you there (best to get off at Victoria Embankment) from opposite the Victoria Centre and from Broadmarsh Bus Station. The stadium has a capacity of around 30,000 divided between the Brian Clough stand (double tier), the Upper and Lower Bridgford, the Main Stand (single tier) and the Trent End (double tier). Away fans are sat in the Lower Bridgford and amenities such as players' dressing rooms, tunnel etc are situated in the Main Stand. Personally I would advise that as a home supporter, you sit anywhere but the Main Stand as it is of the lowest quality. A good view is obtained from the Brian Clough upper and the best atmospehere can be found in the Capital One Corner, between the Clough and the Bridgford. Facilities in the concourse are fairly standard, with provision for fast food and alcoholic drinks, as well as toilets and a Ladbrokes betting booth. Programmes can also be bought within the ground. If you encounter any problems or have any queries there are always many safety stewards around that you can rely upon. Smoking is not permitted within the City Ground so best you have a fag before you come in as they won't let you back in again if you exit for a cigarette! The club shop is situated outside the ground and matchday tickets can be bought from here as well as from outside the Brian Clough stand. Tickets are approx. £24-26 for adults and £12 for concessions, such as students. Children's prices vary as the club often put on deals such as 'kids for a quid.' There are plenty of cafes and places where you can grab a snack before or after the game in the surrounding streets. The Trent Bridge Inn is a nearby pub that can be used on matchday for home fans who must show a valid matchday ticket on entry. There is also a restaurant in the Trent End. Overall, despite once housing a European Cup winning side, the City Ground is a fairly standard stadium with basic facilities, easily reached from Nottingham City Centre.

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            04.11.2008 18:14
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            Home to Nottingham Forest FC

            The City Ground is home to Nottingham Forest FC who currently play in the Championship. The ground is located to the South of the city centre next to the River Trent in West Bridgford. The current areas of the ground are Brian Clough stand, The Trent End, Brian Clough Stand, Bridgford Upper and Lower(for away supporters) and The Main Stand with a family area. There are a few pubs close the the ground and places to eat including a chip shop and Mcdonalds. Bus numbers 6-11 go from Broadmarsh Shopping Centre and the train station to Trent Bridge. The train station is around 20 minutes walking distance away. There is parking available at Meadow Lane in Notts Countys carpark which isn't too far away. Current home ticket prices are: Adult - £20 to £30 Senior Citizen - £15 to £22 Under 18 - £12 Under 12 - £6 You can save money by purchasing tickets in advance rather than on the matchday. It is also cheaper to sit in the Family Stand. The official programme is £3. The club shop is located just outside the entrance to the Main Stand.

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              19.10.2000 02:24
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              Although I love Forest through and through I do get annoyed about the Forest board. They are not there to make the club better or get promoted but to make a profit. The stadium, for a division one side, is not a bad one. I personally prefer the Trent End as it is the newest and best condition one. As soon as they get enough cash together to knock down the Main Stand and bulid a new one, the stadium would be fit for the premiership.

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              01.10.2000 02:42

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              As much as I love Nottingham Forest I'm becoming increasingly frustrated at the lack of firepower and will to win in front of the home fans. We really try and get behind the boys but it really does put me in a bad mood for the whole weekend if we've played terrible on the Saturday. Many people in the media and on the local radio accuse the Forest fans of getting on the teams back once we go behind or start playing badly but what do you expect? We pay our money to get in, use petrol to get there and then usually waste a couple of hours watching a team under-perform to way below their potential. Sort it out Platty!

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              12.07.2000 02:11
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              The home of the great Nottingham Forest for most of their footballing history, but now is a host to a side some may call fallen hereos. Once two times champions of Europe, Forest just struggled to stay in the First Division. The stadium itself can hold 30,000 at a push, and it was this attribute which led to the stadium being used as a venue for some matches during Euro96. Sadly The City Ground was not put forward as a possible venue in England's failed World Cup 2006 bid, with Derby County's Pride Park being chosen instead as the representative for the region. The City Ground has undergone some refurbishment in the recent years, with the new Trent End being completley rebuilt in the early 1990s. A new public address system has also just been installed to help communication in the ground. The food at The City Ground is much better than I have found at most football grounds. With the greatest discovery that I have only found at a few other grounds, a chicken balti pie, which combines both a curry and a pie to make an excellent half time snack.

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