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Selhurst Park (Crystal Palace)

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      01.07.2010 12:40
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      A good place to see an average priced Championship game as a family.

      Selhurst Park is the home of my beloved team Crystal Palace and the site of a Championship football match every other Saturday. Situated in South Norwood, it is a nice stadium to go to as a family for a cheap day out to see some average quality football.

      *How do I get there?*

      There are three train stations only a ten minute walk from the stadium: Selhurst, Thornton Heath and Norwood Junction.

      The Selhurst train comes from Victoria, and is accesible from East Croydon station (where I always alight, taking three minutes). Turn left upon exit and then go up this road and turn left onto Clifton Road.

      The train to Norwood Junction comes from London Bridge and Victoria. Out of the station, turn left at the end of road into Selhurst Road then take the 3rd turning on the right to the ground.

      The train to Thornton Heath comes from Victoria. Turn left out of the station and cross the road. Bear right at the first junction into the High Street and then turn left onto Whitehorse Lane.

      Travel by car is possible, but not recommended on matchdays. There are hardly any parking spaces and you often have to park far from the stadium and walk up. Having said that, there is a car park for ticketholders situated outside the giant Sainsbury's by the ground. It's very hard to miss and if you arrive quickly enough you should find a spot. Likewise, Tennison Road is a good choice place to park further out from the stadium which always tends to have free spaces.

      (NOTE: Most of this travel info has been obtained from www.holmesdale.net, a great fansite with more info on the stadium too.)

      *Ticketing*

      Tickets for games can be bought on matchday for normally the same prices as beforehand. Most games are not sold out so if you're nearby on matchday and make a spur of the moment decision you won't be disappointed.

      Each stand has a selection of ticket sellers which are easily visible on arrival. Try and have an idea of ticket prices prior to arriving so you're not swindled as some of the sellers can try and be a bit cheeky sometimes.

      Tickets for an adult start at around £25 while concessions (over 60 and students) are around £15. Youth tickets are £10 and last year the ticket was modified to be a 16-18 years ticket, which was a bonus. One of the best recent initiatives has been the 'Kid for a Quid' scheme operating at the club. This has meant a lot more youngsters have come to see Palace games and this is a great benefit for the club. It is a family club, and there is often a family atmosphere as a result, so don't be worried about taking your kids there to see a game.

      *Capacity*

      The stadium has a capacity of 26,400 and if you go to see an important game it can feel like a lot more than that. I have brilliant memories of the stadium; be it the game against Inter Milan in 2005 or the 1-1 with Arsenal in the 2004-5 season, this really has been a great place to watch football. The fans are so passionate and there is rarely a dull moment, with club chants and songs creating a pumping atmosphere for most games.

      Programme sellers are dotted around the stadium outside and are easy to find, as are those within the stadium itself. A programme will set you back a maximum of £3.00.

      One thing you have to understand is that Palace is by no means a rich club. To this end, the stadium has not been renovated for a number of years. The stands house mostly wooden seats, and the Main Stand itself is mostly made out of wood in structural terms. By far the most impressive of the stands is the Holmesdale Road Stand, which is the largest and houses the most supporters of any of the others. I personally recommend seeing a game from the Upper Tier, which offers breathtaking views not only of the pitch but the surrounding area too.

      *Catering*

      The catering offers the usual fare of football stadiums. Hot dogs and pies, as well as chips, are the foods of choice for a Palace game and there are numerous kiosks per stand. Due to high demand, though, there are often large queues so it's best to obtain refreshments during the game rather than at half-time when they're inundated. A regular Pukka-Pie will set you back around £3.00, a reasonable price.

      Better still, stock up on goods beforehand. Take some food in a rucksack or something and feast on your own food to save a couple of pounds. I would personally not recommend the food services as I find them too expensive for what's offered, though the prices themselves are normally reasonable.

      *Surrounding pubs / eateries*

      There are numerous fast food outlets just outside the stadium which offer reasonable matchday deals.

      A comprehensive pub guide can be found at the below link, and is your best bet for information as I normally frequent pubs nearer to home!

      http://www.holmesdale.net/page.php?id=53

      To summarise, Selhurst Park is a small gem in South Norwood. An intimate stadium which is easy enough to get to, with pretty reasonable tickets and a nice match-day atmosphere, it is a good choice for anyone looking for an affordable day of football in the London area.

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        09.03.2009 17:56

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        A poor championship ground let alone a premiership ground a few seasons ago

        Firstly i am not a Crystal Palace fan but i have visited this ground on lots of occasions as an away fan seeing them play Ipswich Town. I have been to alot of grounds so ive seen some really nice ones, and some real stinkers. Selhurst park is a stinker. How this can be seen as a top half championship/ bottom half premiership football stadium beats me! It was built in 1924 which shows just how old it is and i think they have touched the away section since then. They have two modern stand behind each goal. One of them is a two tiered stand which is a big new modern stand named the holmesdale stand. Behind the other goal there is a Smaller new stand which is one tier high with executive boxes up high named the Croydon stand. The main stand looks older and tired with big supporting beams in places keeping the stand together. The Arthurt Waite stand is where the away fans get an allocation of about 2,500 in the corner. The facilities here are a disgrace! There is a decent size eating and drinking facility but the standing area is small and cramped and there is no security between the home and away fans in that stand. To get to the toilet you have to go down some of the steepest steps i have ever seen and these are in need of up grading. The worst thing about this stadium i feel is in the away section they have new coloured plastic seats at the front of the stand to make it look nice for the cameras but once you get past the first 10-20 rows the seats are wooden and not even anough leg room for a small child to sit in.
        I have been to worse grounds than this but this is a stadium of a team which boasts they were in the Premiership a few seasons back and this is not a premiership ground!

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        11.01.2009 23:18
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        cracking ground, its places like these that give english football its name.

        My home Selhurst Park. The greatest footballing ground in the world.
        Selhurst park, home to the best team in the world, Crystal Palace FC, holds a capacity of around 26,300. It is packed to the rafters on every matchday ( NOT ). 07/08 we average a mere 16,000 fans per home game. The main reason of this is the pricing of tickets, Simon jordan has continued to set high prices and palace have the most expensive tickets in the Championship. Selhurst park is the 31st biggest football stadium in England. The ground was opened in August 1924 and has provided top level football for many years and hopefully for years to come.

        Selhurst park is situated in South London in the suburbs of south norwood.

        Like most football grounds, there are four stands, in Selhurst Park the stands are called:

        The Holmsdale end : hardcore fans
        Arthur Wait : Arthur Wait Massive are situated here
        Whitehorse: family stand
        Main stand (croydon advertiser)

        Selhurst park can be accessed by train,bus and car. Although i recommend train as parking can be hard to find on matchday.
        The highest att that Selhurst park has ever seen is just over 51,000 where the red and blue army turned out in there forces to see palace vs burnley.

        Memorable moments at selhurst park:

        Of course the cantona incident when eric cantona famously scissor kicked a fan.

        David beckhams goal from half way line, (played against wimbledon)

        Over the years Selhurst park has been shared with other clubs such as Wimbledon (most recently) and Charlton.

        Overall great stadium, very atmospheric when we are playing in the premiership, lets hope thats soon aye!!!

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          16.11.2008 13:21
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          worth a visit if you like your football

          Selhurst Park is the home ground of Crystal Palace Football Club who currently play their football in the English Championship, the second tier of football after the Premier League. I have visited the stadium on numerous occasions because it is quite close to where I live, the tickets are relatively cheap and when they were in the Premiership a few seasons ago you could see some top quality matches and view some of the best players in the world, great stuff! I'm actually a Millwall supporter and have been with them to away games at selhurst and the atmosphere has been tremendous, generally its quite good at most games with the bulk of the noise coming from the bottom tier of the Holmesdale Road Stand where the more vocal supporters have their season tickets.

          Although the capacity is quite impressive for a championship side, 26309 to be precise, the look of the ground is quite bizarre. All four stands are completely different. As already mentioned the Holmesdale Road Stand is the newest and largest stand by quite a margin. It has a large lower tier with a smaller upper tier and is a very impressive looking stand, although it does rather dwarf the rest of the ground, a bit of a shame. This stand is behind the goal. At the other end of the ground is the Croydon Advertiser Family Stand, a really odd looking creation. It was only ever going to be a small stand because it backs directly onto a large supermarket, but the design is rather unique. There are approximately fifteen rows of seating and then at the rear of the stand there are executive boxes, but not the single row as in most stadiums, this stand incorporates two levels of boxes, it is very strange. A good feature of this stand is the hanging television screen which comes down from the roof of the stand, it fairly large and shows replays and the time remaining. On the two remaining sides of the pitch you have the Main Stand (home supporters) and the Arthur Wait Stand (home and away supporters). Both of the stands are really old, the seats are uncomfortable and they really could do with updating.

          Pricing of tickets varies depending upon the rating given to the game, either A, B or C. This is a system adopted by a number of clubs across the country and I believe it works well. Category C matches are cheaper than B and A, but are deemed not as entertaining if that makes sense. For example a carling cup tie against another league team would be graded lower than an FA Cup quarter final against premiership opposition. Examples of prices: A £30-£40, B £25-£35, C £20-£30. Concessions are obviously cheaper than this, these are all adult prices.

          There are many places where you can purchase food and drinks from inside the stadium and it seems to be cheaper than other grounds I have visited. For example burgers are about £2.00 and chips £1.00, drinks are generally below £1.00. The official programme costs £3.00 and is a good read.

          I have enjoyed my trips to Selhurst, the stadium has a unique charm about it (every stand has blue and red seating, the teams colours and many slogans are written using the seating across the stands, although you'll obviously have to get to the ground early to see this) and there is always a good atmosphere and banter between the fans. It would be good if Palace could make it back into the premier league.

          Thanks for reading.

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            26.04.2005 19:26
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            • "Nightmare to get to"

            Having ventured to many of the Premier League grounds this season I’ve seen the best and the worst. To be fair that hasn’t really been anything in this league that could compare to some of the grounds in other divisions. Trust me once you’ve seen a game at the National Hockey Stadium in Milton Keynes on a blustery February afternoon you’ll think a lot of other places are paradise.

            The Premier League is fast becoming the be all and end all of football. Yes it’s exciting, the stakes are high, and the rewards big etc but it’s starting to ebb away from the lower divisions where clubs are struggling financially. We’ve yet to see a club go completely under in the football league since the ITV Digital collapse but it will inevitably happen soon. Some argue that football is being priced out of the common man and will soon become a sport for the elite. Well after a trip to Selhurst Park I’m beginning to believe it.

            Crystal Palace came up through the play off’s last season, in the season Norwich also came up as Champions. In our away fixture that season we took 8000 down to Selhurst Park with tickets just over the £20 mark, which is about the norm for the Championship. But now we’re both in the Premier League, needless to say the fans that weren’t there last season have suddenly become Palace supporters again. I have to say I’m surprised as Palace now see it as okay to charge £35 a ticket to away supporters to sit in what is far from the best ground in the Premiership. This price is the second highest in the premiership behind Chelsea that I’ve pad this season, sadly you don’t get any world-class players on show for your money. Christ, even Arsenal charged less than this and in comparison to the other London clubs it’s a disgrace.

            Facilities wise it’s not a great ground either. Away fans are packed into a small area in the concourses that makes it a free for all when trying to get a drink. Should you feel a bit parched? Then try a nice un-chilled beer in a plastic cup for £3. It wasn’t even a pint, what was on offer was Kronenburg poured out of bottles. Each one taken from a crate that was probably purchased from the local supermarket. This is the kind of thing that just takes the piss but once you’re in the ground you don’t have a great deal of choice in the matter.

            What I will say is that we had a good view of the action as the pitch was quite close to the stand. The less said about the game the better, from 3-1 up we were robbed by a dubious penalty decision to draw the match.

            Crystal Palace is located in the Selhurst area of South East London. It’s not really visible in daylight. I would advise travelling there by train once in London if you’re not taking your club’s official coach travel. There are buses that go near the ground but the roads around the area can be a complete nightmare after the game and you’ll often find that buses will have to take a detour. This is a complete nightmare if you’re not familiar with the area. There are three train stations nearby so this would be your best option. You may want to drive but again I’d not really advise it as there didn’t appear to be many places to park safely.

            As we near the end of the season I for one am hoping that I won’t have to take a trip back there next season, if I do then I hope ticket pricing has been dropped accordingly as we’ll both probably be back in the Championship.

            On The Ball City!



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              04.12.2001 02:26
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              (BEFORE I START I WOULD LIKE TO SAY SORRY. THIS OPINION IS WRITTEN IN THE WRONG CATEGORY, IN THE STADIUM NOT IN GENERAL. I WROTE AN OPINION ON PALACE TOWARDS THE END OF LAST YEAR, REFLECTING ON THE BAD TIMES. I DID NOT THINK IT WOULD BE WISE TO JUST OVERWRITE THAT TOLALLY, SO HERE GOES MY NEW OPINION. THANKS, AND PLEASE DONT RATE ME DOWN TOO MUCH, CHRIS) I do not exactly keep it a secret that I am an Exeter City fan (great result at Shrewsbury!), but I also have a soft spot in my footballing life for Crystal Palace. I believe that people should be able to support at least two teams in their life. First you must always have a soft spot for your local team, no matter what level they are. If it is Liverpool or Livingstone, Real Madrid or Rochdale, especially the smaller clubs need your support. In there I also believe there is a place for another team, one bigger in the top few divisions that you watch out for the results, see a few games and generally have a soft spot for. Some may disagree, say you should be loyal to one, some may also call it glory hunting. I have very little time for people who do support team when they are winning. If they buy the shirt they call them supporters, that for me is not football. You stick to your team through thick and thin, take the glory, but endure the misery. It is what football is about. Being an Exeter fan I know, it feels much better to go home knowing you have a good win, against the odds or to end a bad run. I do support Palace, I don’t see as much of them as I like, but they will always have a place within me. It is all my uncle’s fault so, blame him. He is Palace supporter through and through, coming from Croydon. I was staying with him at the time of the 1990 FA Cup where Palace lost the final after a replay to Manchester United, with a certain Ian Wright for the Palace. He brought me a little replica kit for Palace, and though he could not get tickets, he really got me into the atm
              osphere. Since then he has rung me after the game to tell me about it, sent me programs, fanzines and such, and I try to get to two or three games a year. Considering I was born in 1985, I was young and influential, so I have been supporting them for over two thirds of my life. It is a strange team to support, living in Devon and I took a bit of stick for it over my schooldays. I have been through all the highs of the Premiership, to the lows of relegation, but I will always have something there for them. So the last few seasons have been a bit of a roller coaster combined with a yo-yo for Palace. They have tasted Premiership action on more than one occasion, experience the highs and lows of the playoffs, had a taste of Europe, had a few international stars and a few international flops, until last year where they nearly managed to get relegated to the second division. The fact is I feel they have potential to become at least a regular in the Premiership. They are London based, centrally for a large audience, are an attractive club, nice kit, great youth policy and now a stable financial situation. They have a big potential, though there have had major problems in the past hopefully they are all behind them now, and with the current squad there is a real chance. There have been many problems with Crystal Palace, all pretty spectacularly plastered all over the sports world. Ron Noads is now the chairman of second division Brentford used to be the chairman of Crystal Palace. He wanted out, and the club was sold to a certain Mr. Goldberg. Basically the result was a disaster, Goldberg did not have the financial backing to buy the whole club and a very silly situation occurred where Palace did not own the land the stadium was on, the training ground was still owned by Ron Noades, and it ended with the club bankrupt and the administrators called in. Now Simon Jordan has taken over, all the money has been put back, and though it was a badly tangled web
              it all seems to have come back together. Obviously this going on in the background had to affect the team, wages were not paid regularly and there was talk of Palace being kicked out of the league, as their position slipped. The money problems could also have steamed from the latest fall from the Premiership, as at the time the TV money was nothing like what it is today. Palace were paying stars like Attilio Lombardo and Michale Padavano large wages, then lost all the money for being part of the Premiership. Huge debts were incurred, thankfully is all seems to be a lot better now. On the field I may be biased, but frankly Palace have a great team, combining a successful youth policy and older pros to form a promotion challenging team. The first division is notoriously tough to get out of, but I think Palace will be one of the top challengers. If you want to know I think that Wolves and Palace will be the two automatic promotion places, with Burnely winning in the playoffs. Birmingham will again lose in the playoff semi final, and I can also see Palace putting together a fairly decent cup run. Hopefully they will not get too distracted by the cup and won’t let league form suffer. Coming out of the league cup, where Palace reached the semis last year may have been a disappointment, but could be a blessing come the end of the season when there are plenty of matches and injuries. New signing Matt Clarke has made the number one keeper position his own since arriving from Bradford City for £1.4 million during this season. He dislodged Latvian international stopper Alexander Kolinko who has proved to be a good servant over the years. However he was not universally popular, and had a bit of a reputation as a dodgy keeper. Former Torquay man Matt Gregg who had a loan spell down here at Exeter has left to play in the Irish league, and from the youth ranks Lee Kendell is a Welsh under-21 international is a good player to look for in the future.
              The defense, when compared to the attack could be a potential weakness. Now without the speed and guild of Neil Ruddock, (Swindon now have the pleasure) there is a lack of height and weight at the back. Steve Bruce tried to solve this by brining in Steve Vickers from Middlesborough on loan. The fact the board refused to make it permanent may have had something to do with their eventual falling out. Christian Edwards is now on loan from Nottingham Forest with a view to a more permanent move. I rate Hayden Mullins very highly; he is a former England Under-21 international. He is a quality player, tough but good enough to play the ball out of defense. He is quite small though and lack any real physical presence. Chinese international Fan Zihi has left for Dundee after a fall out with Bruce about him missing much of the season to help China qualify for the World Cup. Jamie Smith is a very dependable right back, but can get forward, while Dean Austin is great, really adding a lot of experience at the back. Tony Popovic is another recent signing, though has missed games with international duty for Australia and now injury. David Hopkin, the hero with a last minute winner in the playoff against Sheffield United has been reunited with Palace after an injury plagued career with Leeds United. He is a very hardworking and tough midfielder though still troubled with knee and ankle injuries. Jovan Kirovski was signed in the summer from Sporting Lisbon and is a full American international. More attacking minded, he is stylish and creative and has added a more dangerous approach to the Palace midfield. Julian Gray is a former Arsenal player, but is finding his top form after being released. He is a wide player, he has got some nasty racial abuse, but all is behind him. Andreus Rubins is another Latvian international like the keeper Kolinko. Very, very quick and another winger he is not in the first team at the moment. Upfront is where the real talent l
              ies, though it is not all a one man show. Dougie Freeman works well with Morrison, but there is fine support from the midfield with people pitching in goals and creative sparks to get the goals. Clinton Morrison has finally worked out where he is from to get his international career under way. The Tooting born striker could have played from England and a few Caribbean nations before deciding he was Irish. Freeman is a new international, he scored recently against Latvia on his Scotland debut. Overall Palace recently had scored more goals that the allegedly free scoring Manchester City under King Kev, while having a much better defensive record. The youth system is again working well, Steve Kabba and Andrew Martin are all on the verge of the full team, while Kirovski can play up front. More unwanted news filled Palace recently with the saga of Steve Bruce. He was appointed Palace manager in the summer from Wigan. He brought and impressive record, but a slightly poor reputation with loyalty. That was confirmed, as just a few months into the season he wanted to tear up his contract and become manager of Birmingham, to fill in for the recently departed Trevor Francis. Francis was named the new Palace manager at a recent press conference. He essentially inherits the same team, though Simon Jordan has made a fair sized transfer kitty available. I think that Jordan has come out of the Bruce affair very well. He has stuck to his guns, kept a very steady hand and stood up for what he and I believe is right. The case has gone to the courts, and it now has been resolved with the arrival of Francis and a payoff from Birmingham in the region of £1 million. Maybe it was a drawn out decision for both clubs, and Palaces recent run of poorer form could be down to another case of incidents at the club. I still admire Jordan for his persistence and determination. Francis's first game in charger was the 2-1 defeat to Burnely at the weekend that was the oppositio
              n go top, and leave Palace off the pace a little. However I firmly believe that they will stay consistent over the season, which is more than can be said for some of the teams around. They have made their team out of a good formula of young talent and older players. They have learnt their lessons and mistakes will not be made again. The finance will now be safe, the demands of the Premiership are hard and the gulf is ever widening. The newly proposed ‘Phoenix League’ could be an interesting development as the leagues get reshuffled. Look out for another opinion coming soon on that from me, as usual I have plenty of views of the sporting world!!

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                13.02.2001 02:40
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                At one point last season, there was a real possibility that Crystal Palace FC would be forced to leave Selhurst Park, their home for over 75 years. Of course, the fact that the club existed at all was a minor miracle, having been in administration for more than a year. Thankfully though, arrangements for a new lease were finally agreed and it now looks like the ground will remain a part of the club, for the foreseeable future at least. Palace’s financial difficulties have been well documented over the course of the last two seasons, so I won’t repeat them here. One fact that many people don’t realise though is that Selhurst Park isn’t owned by Crystal Palace FC at all. It actually belongs to former chairman Ron Noades, hence the complications that have arisen since his sale of the club in 1998. I don’t believe the ground will ever truly fulfil it’s potential until it is bought by the club itself, and hopefully this will happen in the not-too-distant future. Many people have complained about the difficulty in getting to Selhurst Park, but I believe this is more down to a lack of research on the part of the travelling fan than anything else. One of the commonest mistakes for away fans to make is going to Crystal Palace railway station, which is actually nowhere near the ground! The stations you should be aiming for are Selhurst, Thornton Heath or Norwood Junction, all of which are easily reachable from London, through either Victoria or London Bridge. The nearest major train station (if you’re not travelling from London) is East Croydon, which has frequent connections to all three nearby stations. The biggest problem when travelling to Selhurst Park is if you’re driving, as there is a distinct lack of parking spaces near the ground. Placed in the middle of a residential area, the roads immediately surrounding the ground are closed on match days, meaning the nearest place you’
                ll be able to park is around 20 minutes to half an hour away. A few years ago the ground wasn’t well signposted either, but thankfully that has improved recently. Still, I wouldn’t advise driving to Selhurst Park unless there’s no other option, in which case you should certainly read the travel information page on the club website (www.cpfc.co.uk/information/maps.shtml) before leaving. Getting back to the ground, the impressive new Holmesdale Road stand is definitely the best of the four. Constructed in 1995, the Holmesdale seats approximately 8,500 fans over its two tiers. The upper tier is the more expensive and, in my opinion, has less of an atmosphere than the lower. It does, however, offer a splendid view of the pitch, and is well worth experiencing at least once. The lower tier is undoubtedly THE place to sit for home supporters, in particular blocks A, B and C, where the atmosphere is simply electric. The seating is fairly spacious and comfortable, though I must admit that fans in the aforementioned blocks rarely do sit down. There are also reasonably good catering facilities in this stand, providing the standard burgers, pies, and hot and cold drinks, as well as a few bars that offer refreshments of the alcoholic variety. Directly opposite the Holmesdale and behind the other goal is the Croydon Advertiser Family Stand (formally known as the Whitehorse Lane stand). Traditionally offering the cheapest tickets, this is the smallest stand (seating around 3000) and is generally taken up by families taking advantage of the generous kids prices. The most notable addition to the stand is the new Philips Alfresco big-screen television, which overhangs the top of the stand and shows the action from the game live, in addition to pre-match interviews and team line-ups. Only installed in January 2001, the screen cost a reputed £1m and is a reflection of the ambition shown by new chairman Simon Jordan since his takeover of the club.
                The oldest stand at Selhurst Park is the Main Stand, which hasn’t changed much since it was first built in the 1920’s. Running along the length of the pitch, it perhaps offers the best views, although this comes at a price. Tickets here are among the most expensive, especially for those wishing to make use of the hospitality bars and lounges at the back. The stand is definitely in need of improvement, as it now looks very deteriorated. I’ve only sat in the Main Stand on one occasion and found the seating to be comfortable and well organised, although the price difference would put most people off sitting there regularly. The remaining stand is the Arthur Wait Stand (named after a previous chairman), and is also fairly old. A new roof was installed last summer to allow the stand to pass a safety inspection, but more improvements will definitely be needed in time. The only really qualm about this stand is that the view of the pitch can be obstructed at times, most notably by the supporting pillars. There were also problems with the sound quality of the PA system in the Arthur Wait last season, although it does seemed to have improved since then. Despite receiving a lot of criticism, I don’t think the actual playing surface is as bad as some people make out. When you consider there are two teams playing regularly at Selhurst Park (Palace and Wimbledon share the ground), it is credit to the groundsman for keeping the pitch in a playable condition at all. Towards the end of the season, the grass does get pretty worn down, especially around the goals, although I think there are plans to relay the pitch at some point in the near future. Prices for food and drink throughout the ground have improved significantly since Simon Jordan’s takeover last summer. In addition to the widespread price reductions, there are also a number of promotions that regularly take place, including a "buy one get one free&qu
                ot; offer on burgers, and bottles of beer for just a pound. The quality of the food isn’t bad either (what you’d expect from a football ground really), and is an improvement over previous years. This is all part of the chairman’s plans to make the ground a more attractive option for pre-match entertainment. The biggest problem for me with Selhurst Park is the price of match-day tickets, as surely this is putting many people off attending matches. The cheapest ticket is priced at £17 (in either the Croydon Advertiser Stand or the Holmesdale lower tier), and away fans must pay £18 for their seats. Having said this, credit should go to the club for organising regular "Family Fun Days", where a child can attend the game for free when accompanied with an adult, and many tickets are also given away free to local schools. The capacity of Selhurst Park is approximately 26,500 although to my knowledge, the ground has only been completely sold out once in the last few years – in the cup semi-final against Liverpool this season. Away fans are generally allocated around 2,000 seats situated at one end of the Arthur Wait Stand, at the end adjacent to the Holmesdale. This creates quite a bit of banter between the two sets of fans, although the stewards are generally pretty effective in dealing with anyone who goes too far. On the whole, the stewards and police around the ground are fairly good, and you shouldn’t really have any trouble with them. The club has traditionally been referred to as a 'family club' and I’d definitely agree that it’s a friendly one too, with very little trouble in or around the ground. Further information about the club, the ground, and ticket prices can be found on the official club website at www.cpfc.co.uk, with additional information also available at www.cpfc.org

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                  11.02.2001 20:31
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                  At one point last season, there was a real possibility that Crystal Palace FC would be forced to leave Selhurst Park, their home for over 75 years. Of course, the fact that the club existed at all was a minor miracle, having been in administration for more than a year. Thankfully though, arrangements for a new lease were finally agreed and it now looks like the ground will remain a part of the club, for the foreseeable future at least. Palace’s financial difficulties have been well documented over the course of the last two seasons, so I won’t repeat them here. One fact that many people don’t realise though is that Selhurst Park isn’t owned by Crystal Palace FC at all. It actually belongs to former chairman Ron Noades, hence the complications that have arisen since his sale of the club in 1998. I don’t believe the ground will ever truly fulfil it’s potential until it is bought by the club itself, and hopefully this will happen in the not-too-distant future. Many people have complained about the difficulty in getting to Selhurst Park, but I believe this is more down to a lack of research on the part of the travelling fan than anything else. One of the commonest mistakes for away fans to make is going to Crystal Palace railway station, which is actually nowhere near the ground! The stations you should be aiming for are Selhurst, Thornton Heath or Norwood Junction, all of which are easily reachable from London, through either Victoria or London Bridge. The nearest major train station (if you’re not travelling from London) is East Croydon, which has frequent connections to all three nearby stations. The biggest problem when travelling to Selhurst Park is if you’re driving, as there is a distinct lack of parking spaces near the ground. Placed in the middle of a residential area, the roads immediately surrounding the ground are closed on match days, meaning the nearest place you’ll b
                  e able to park is around 20 minutes to half an hour away. A few years ago the ground wasn’t well signposted either, but thankfully that has improved recently. Still, I wouldn’t advise driving to Selhurst Park unless there’s no other option, in which case you should certainly read the travel information page on the club website (www.cpfc.co.uk/information/maps.shtml) before leaving. Getting back to the ground, the impressive new Holmesdale Road stand is definitely the best of the four. Constructed in 1995, the Holmesdale seats approximately 8,500 fans over its two tiers. The upper tier is the more expensive and, in my opinion, has less of an atmosphere than the lower. It does, however, offer a splendid view of the pitch, and is well worth experiencing at least once. The lower tier is undoubtedly THE place to sit for home supporters, in particular blocks A, B and C, where the atmosphere is simply electric. The seating is fairly spacious and comfortable, though I must admit that fans in the aforementioned blocks rarely do sit down. There are also reasonably good catering facilities in this stand, providing the standard burgers, pies, and hot and cold drinks, as well as a few bars that offer refreshments of the alcoholic variety. Directly opposite the Holmesdale and behind the other goal is the Croydon Advertiser Family Stand (formally known as the Whitehorse Lane stand). Traditionally offering the cheapest tickets, this is the smallest stand (seating around 3000) and is generally taken up by families taking advantage of the generous kids prices. The most notable addition to the stand is the new Philips Alfresco big-screen television, which overhangs the top of the stand and shows the action from the game live, in addition to pre-match interviews and team line-ups. Only installed in January 2001, the screen cost a reputed £1m and is a reflection of the ambition shown by new chairman Simon Jordan since his takeover of the club. The oldest stand at Selhurst Park is the Main Stand, which hasn’t changed much since it was first built in the 1920’s. Running along the length of the pitch, it perhaps offers the best views, although this comes at a price. Tickets here are among the most expensive, especially for those wishing to make use of the hospitality bars and lounges at the back. The stand is definitely in need of improvement, as it now looks very deteriorated. I’ve only sat in the Main Stand on one occasion and found the seating to be comfortable and well organised, although the price difference would put most people off sitting there regularly. The remaining stand is the Arthur Wait Stand (named after a previous chairman), and is also fairly old. A new roof was installed last summer to allow the stand to pass a safety inspection, but more improvements will definitely be needed in time. The only really qualm about this stand is that the view of the pitch can be obstructed at times, most notably by the supporting pillars. There were also problems with the sound quality of the PA system in the Arthur Wait last season, although it does seemed to have improved since then. Despite receiving a lot of criticism, I don’t think the actual playing surface is as bad as some people make out. When you consider there are two teams playing regularly at Selhurst Park (Palace and Wimbledon share the ground), it is credit to the groundsman for keeping the pitch in a playable condition at all. Towards the end of the season, the grass does get pretty worn down, especially around the goals, although I think there are plans to relay the pitch at some point in the near future. Prices for food and drink throughout the ground have improved significantly since Simon Jordan’s takeover last summer. In addition to the widespread price reductions, there are also a number of promotions that regularly take place, including a "buy one get one free" offer
                  on burgers, and bottles of beer for just a pound. The quality of the food isn’t bad either (what you’d expect from a football ground really), and is an improvement over previous years. This is all part of the chairman’s plans to make the ground a more attractive option for pre-match entertainment. The biggest problem for me with Selhurst Park is the price of match-day tickets, as surely this is putting many people off attending matches. The cheapest ticket is priced at £17 (in either the Croydon Advertiser Stand or the Holmesdale lower tier), and away fans must pay £18 for their seats. Having said this, credit should go to the club for organising regular "Family Fun Days", where a child can attend the game for free when accompanied with an adult, and many tickets are also given away free to local schools. The capacity of Selhurst Park is approximately 26,500 although to my knowledge, the ground has only been completely sold out once in the last few years – in the cup semi-final against Liverpool this season. Away fans are generally allocated around 2,000 seats situated at one end of the Arthur Wait Stand, at the end adjacent to the Holmesdale. This creates quite a bit of banter between the two sets of fans, although the stewards are generally pretty effective in dealing with anyone who goes too far. On the whole, the stewards and police around the ground are fairly good, and you shouldn’t really have any trouble with them. The club has traditionally been referred to as a 'family club' and I’d definitely agree that it’s a friendly one too, with very little trouble in or around the ground. Further information about the club, the ground, and ticket prices can be found on the official club website at www.cpfc.co.uk, with additional information also available at www.cpfc.org.

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                    04.02.2001 15:53
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                    this is a stadium that ahs been ground sharing with wimbledon fc for many, many years now. many poeple complain about the state of the pitch, and sometimes i have to agree! but at the beggining of the year we were taken over a what i consider to be a great chairman to the club, simon jordan, former owner of the pocket phone shop. since this happened there have been many improvements to the ground, including; new dressing rooms, a large screen tv, cheaper prices, and the new gold season ticket!!! the new screen that has been added to the ground is absolutly fabulous, we can now watch the before game interviews with the chairman and manager, and now the game is featured live on the screen at the stadium. there has also been good news that is under suspision. this is that wimbledon may (hopefully will) be moving out of the ground, either to milton keynes, or somewhere closer to the venue, in loondon. either way it is great news for crystal palace because the pitch will now be in great shape for the matches that we play there each week, and it means that there will be more games on saturday, rather than mid - week games, which i have to tell you make me very tired, when i have school the next day! so come on lets support the ground and make it one of the best games in the first division!

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                    27.09.2000 20:57
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                    Selhurst Park is not the greatest stadium in the world. Any Palace fan will tell you that. It probably never will be the greatest stadium in the world, regardless of the dreams of ex-chairman (and still owner of the Stadium) Ron Noades, nice little models and the wishes of Palace fans. However it is our home and we love it. Although some people claim to have difficulty finding the place the ground is in fact pretty accessible. I find this so because I largely travel to the ground by train. There are three stations within relatively good walking distance. From Central London you can get to Norwood Junction from London Bridge or Victoria, or to Thornton Heath or Selhurst from Victoria. If you are travelling from the South you generally cannot go wrong if you go to East Croydon station, as from there you can get connecting trains to any of three stations mentioned above on a regular basis. If you're interested in going by train Selhurst is the station nearest to the ground, and the one which is easiest to find the ground from (you get a pretty clear view of the ground as you approach the station from the North). I would definitely recommend travelling by train. Car parking spaces are effectively street-parking spaces only and I would have to admit that the stadium is not very well signposted. So onto the stadium itself.The highlight of the ground is the new Holmesdale Stand. Opened in August 1995 it seats 8,500 (or so) and is a splendid facility with spacious seating and fantastic views. The turnstiles are a bit tight, but access is reasonably good and leaving the stand is comfortable, if a little bit slow. The stand also has the odd distinction of having burger bars named after former Palace greats. When the stand opened fans mulled over the possibility of it being called "The Jim Cannon Stand", not realising that we would have to make do with "The Jim Cannon Burger Bar" instead! The Croydon Advertiser Family
                    Stand was redeveloped in 1993 and has a small seating section. It is tidy enough, although the legroom there is not the most spacious. Fans who sit there also have the disadvantage that they cannot see what is being shown on the new Jumbotron video screen, which is positioned on the roof of this stand. Also be aware of the slanting roof in the toilets which lead to you bumping your head if you're not careful! The Arthur Wait Stand, where visiting supporters are seated, is adequate but not sensational. It is very shallow so views are not always that good, and there are a number of pillars in place to support the roof which can hinder your view even further. However it has a special place in my heart as it was "the Arfur" which I first sat in on visits to Selhurst. Even now the acoustics are fantastic, but for me it is a shame that it is the away fans producing the noise! The Main Stand looks old and shabby on the outside, which is not surprising as it has been in place since the ground opened in 1924. However the seats are comfortable and offer a good view (pillars aside) without the sun getting in your eyes. The Main Stand is also where the hospitality lounges are kept, and they are pretty tidy as well, with the Glaziers bar being a popular (as well as crowded!) pre-match meeting place for Palace fans. The ground is in need of redevelopment in parts. While the club was in Ron Noades' hands there were attempts to redevelop the Main Stand, but the local council made it virtually impossible for any work to start and the plans were abandoned. The difficulty now is that Ron Noades still owns the stadium but without owning Crystal Palace. The ground is still a valuable asset to him without him his having to put any money into it, so until the time should come for Simon Jordan (the new Palace owner) to buy the ground don't expect major developments at Selhurst Park.

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