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Turf Moor (Burnley FC)

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4 Reviews

The Turf / Turf Moor, Brunshaw Road, Burnley, Lancashire BB10 4BX.

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      28.01.2010 12:45
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      needs a facelift

      Turf Moor home of Burnley is one of my favourite away grounds, it feels like a ground which has seen countless games and has enjoyed good times and bad. I've been to watch games at Burnley quite a few times and every time enjoyed the experience if not always the result.

      Turf Moor is the home of now Premiership Burnley but I can remember watching games between Grimsby and Burnley in at least two divisions lower than that, if not three. The ground is as I said old but like the old Burnden park at Bolton and dear old Blundell Park you just know that your here to watch a decent hard fought game of football.

      One of the strangest aspects of the ground is the fact that the players come out from behind one of the goals, I'm told this is almost unique in modern football I certainly can't recall another ground doing the same.

      The stadium is split into four stands of a variety of ages, the best for sitting and watching the game is the James Hargreaves (I've no idea who he is) its two teir and allows decent views of the game. The away end is one half of the cricket field stand as the other half is full of Burnley fans the banter can be pretty intense. I'm told the whole stand is available for Blackburn fans to stop any crowd disturbances between the two. The away end is as all decent away ends should be, slightly decrepid and needing a bit of TLC or a fresh coat of paint. I'm suspecting both will have been done before the visit of Man U for Burnleys first home game this season.

      I love visiting Burnley with its slightly faded colours and slight sense that the modern world has passed it by, hopefully with the club now in the premiership the old ground will get a bit of a makeover and the club can appear all bright and shiny to the world.

      Getting to the ground is pretty easy with the train station near by and pretty decent road links, the food around is well classic football fare - pies and chips but there are a few football friendly pubs dotted near the ground. The locals are mostly friendly.

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      15.06.2009 12:49
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      an old ground with lots of character

      Congratulations to Owen Coyle and Burnley on their promotion to the Premier League following their win over Sheffield United in The Championship Playoff Final at Wembley. Burnley are a quiet and in many ways underrated side, but they have some very good players and a strong work ethic and very much deserved to be promoted. I think they will struggle next season, as it will be hard for them to attract the calibre of players needed to keep them in the top flight, but hey they proved a lot of people wrong this season, so who says they can't do it again next?

      Burnley have played their home matches at 'Turfmoor' since 1883, making it one of the oldest grounds in the football league, an achievement of which they should be proud I think. Modern stadiums seem to be springing up all over the place at the moment and there is something charming about an older stadium with a bit of character. Saying that, the ground was partly modernised during the 1990's with the creation of two new stands, The James Hargreaves Stand (which runs the length of the pitch) and The Jimmy McIlroy Stand (behind the goal). These two stands are fairly large and give the stadium a rather uneven feel as they somewhat dwarf the two remaining old stands. The two other stands are The Bob Lord Stand (a single tired stand which runs the length of the playing surface) and The Bob Lord Stand (a 4000 seated stand which houses the away supporters on match days). The seating in all of the stands is either sky blue or claret, the colours of the team.

      The club does have £20,000,000 plans for modernisation. These include creating new stands to replace the two older ones and the addition of hospitality boxes and new changing rooms in between the two existing newer stands. However, I think these plans were based on the club in the championship and I think they may have to change somewhat now they are in the Premier League. If the club remains in the Premiership and can establish themselves as a top flight team, then they will surely have to increases the stadium capacity to somewhere in the region of 30,000; but we'll see.

      Well, good luck to Burnley for next season. Thanks for reading my review, feel free to comment.

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        10.02.2008 16:50
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        a great tribute to the club

        Turf Moor, as it is known by its loyal fans, is the home of Burnley Football Club, half a mile from the sleepy Lancashire town's centre. Steeped in history from the championship winning side of the 20s plus the legends from the late 50s and early 60s, the ground still carries true to its old roots today. Modernization has inevitably occurred over the years, with areas of terrace being replaced by brand spanking new all seater stands. Notably the 'Longside' disappeared and was replaced by the James Hargreaves Stand in 1996, making way for the new stand which runs parallel to the length of the pitch. This stand houses the majority of the stadiums home support and 22 546 capacity.

        Built in a similar style to the James Hargreaves stand is the 'Jimmy McIlroy' stand to the west, behind the goal. This is also two tiered with all the mod-cons having only being built in 1996.

        Behind the other goal, to the east, is the Cricket Field stand, which currently holds around 4000 away supporters (it is rarely filled except for derby matches). Built in the 60s this stand is vintage Burnley with pillars holding up the roof and fading colors on the seats. Recent proposals for the future should give way to a new 2500 all seater stand replacing the current Cricket Field, as part of a 20 million redevelopment of turf moor. Also included in these plans are a cinema (to be built within the new stand), a new club superstore and a hotel.

        To the south, opposite to the James Hargreaves stand which shadows it is the Bob Lord stand, acting as the other piece of history which still remains. Named after their old chairman, it opened in 1974 and still has the old features to match, with pillars, brown colored seats (faded from claret colored), and a rusty roof. Today, most of the older generations of fans sit in this stand, as well as the chairman and the directors. The two dugouts are also in front of this stand, although the players come out of a tunnel through the Cricket Field Stand.

        Today, Turf Moor averages attendances of 16 or so thousand, as the team looks safe in the Championship. In excess of 12 00 season ticket holders show the level of dedication at the club, fans which managed to make a great atmosphere when their teams doing well. For the best atmosphere, make sure you sit in the upper tier of the James Hargreaves Stand.

        It's interesting to note that Burnley FC has the best ratio of match attendance to town population in the entire country- Quite the achievement for this small town team.

        Tickets for away supporters are currently around £15, and home fans can expect prices of between £15 and £20. The facilities obviously vary between the two sets of stand, with the modern and the old colliding. Food is generally good everywhere though. The famous balti pies are a must (curry in a pie), as are the various forms of Holland's Pie available.

        The ground can be reached relatively easily, with good motorway access to Burnely, and the ground being only half a mile from the town centre. Parking can be difficult though. The local pubs can be found on Yorkshire Street and Brunshaw Road which both lead to the ground. Food and booze are cheap here- but note to away fans- don't go inside them. Fans can get very aggressive after a game towards the away lot- especially if they've lost.
        Police presence is usually not the best of signs.

        Factfile Turf Moor:

        * 22, 546 capacity
        * All seated
        * Situated on Harry Pots way
        * First game in 1883
        * Second only to Preston's Deepdale ground for its age
        * Record attendance was in 1924 with 54,755 people packing into the ground for an FA Cup tie.
        * For tickets prices and information about the ground developments, visit www.burnleyfc.co.uk

        (also on ciao as carneypingu)

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          29.12.2000 01:35
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          The Turf Moor 'Experience' [Background: Once upon a time in a sleepy village in East Lancashire there lived a football team, that was known to its legions of loyal fans as Burnley FC. The team was one of the twelve founder members of the football league in 1888, and almost relinquished their stay in the league 99 years later against Orient on the last day of the season, when a crowd of over 15,000 at Turf Moor thankfully saw their team ensure survival with a 2-1 victory] It is safe to say that if you value: a) your sanity b) your nerves c) your fingernails that Turf Moor is definitely not the place for you. Steeped in history from the championship winning side from 1920/1, plus the legends from the late 1950s and early 1960s (including another league championship in 1959/60), Turf Moor is still a venue to savour. Admittedly, much has changed over the years, and the ground is no longer recognisable from its alter ego from forty years ago when Burnley were in their golden era. Gone is the Longside, to be replaced by a brand spanking new two-tier stand (sponsored by James Hargreaves Plummers mechants) and now known affectionately (but as yet unofficially) as the Harry Potts Longside by the fans. Behind the goals to the West is another matching new two-tier stand named after Burnley legend Jimmy McIlroy. These two sides of the ground, still under five years old, mark the future of Burnley football club, as there are also plans afoot to convert the other two sides of the ground, beginning with the Lookers Cricket Field stand. Sited behind the other goal, this stand currently houses 4,100 away supporters (on the few occasions that visiting teams are able to sell their more than generous allocation). Once this side has been converted to become a replica of the Jimmy McIlroy stand at the opposite end of the ground, only the old Bob Lord stand (named after a former club chairman
          ) will remain. Future progression of the club will mean that eventually this side of the ground will come kicking and screaming into the 21st century too. A seven year stint in the fourth division in the late 1980s and early 1990s were the low point in Burnley's history, but now the fine traditions of the club are coming to the fore once again in the first division. In excess of 12,000 season ticket holders now flock to Turf Moor for each home league game, meaning that with other less regular home supporters and various levels of away support, an average attendance of between 16,000 and 17,000 is assured - quite an achievement for a relatively 'small town' team. Gone are the days when 50,000+ attendances can be seen on the Turf, as the capacity these days is a mere 22,546, but future development should mean that crowds in excess of 30,000 will once again provide the atmosphere for games held at Turf Moor. In fact the ground has already set a precedent in the English football league, with the investment of nearly £60,000 in a continental import. Rather than being another foreign player, it is in fact a modern pitch cover which should ensure that postponements become a thing of the past - for home matches at least. So if you have never been to Turf Moor, or even if you have in the dim and distant past, don't miss the opportunity to visit one of England's most famous league grounds. The home team's miserly defence at home may mean that you'll have difficulty in getting anything out of the game, but if recent history is anything to go by, its sure to be a rollercoaster of a game, and a spectacle for both sets of supporters. Tickets for away supporters are currently £16, with matchday tickets for home supporters priced at between £12 and £17. The remainder of facilities vary, dependent upon the age of the stand, with excellent facilities in the two new stands, but with some room for improvement else
          where. The ground is reasonably accessible, being just half a mile from Burnley town centre, although parking can sometimes be difficult. There are a number of pubs close by on Yorkshire Street and Brunshaw Road (leading to the ground), although away supporters may be best advised to imbibe themselves inside the ground especially if they are wearing colours. {An original Dooyoo opinion © Blackjane 2000}

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          Turf Moor is a football stadium located in Burnley, Lancashire, and is the home ground of English football club Burnley F.C.