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Twickenham Rugby Stadium

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One of the world's most famous rugby union stadiums, situated about 12 miles south-west of London. Tours are available throughout the week, and enthusiasts of rugby union history can check out the Museum of Rugby.

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      13.09.2012 14:56
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      A good stadium but poor parking

      Going to see concerts is always a huge thing for me because I do like many music artists but when I was given a ticket to see Lady Gaga at Twickenham I had to go.

      ~~~ What Is Twickenham Stadium? ~~~

      Well if you're a fan of the rugby in this country most people will say it is used for the England rugby team and cup finals for the teams in the leagues.

      This is an 82,000 capacity stadium played on grass in London and has over 150 executive suites. I heard it was built over 100 years ago and is a huge stadium which dominates the area it is situated in.
      The stadium is used for concerts and this is why I visited on September 8th 2012 to see Lady Gaga perform.

      ~~~ Getting There and Parking ~~~

      Getting to Twickenham was really easy because the Sat Nav found it without me having to put in the post code. You will find though if you're using perhaps an older Sat Nav if you place a stadium in Twickenham it might get confused and take you to the Twickenham Stoop which is another rugby ground.

      The roads getting to Twickenham are good and the one downside perhaps would be any incident on the motorways or the traffic congestion which can build up around the stadium before the event. Some of the roads I was told can be closed off so if you know shortcuts they might be ineffective.

      There is a car park situated on the site of the stadium but it is fully booked very quickly which is annoying to say the least. I unfortunately found out 2 days before I would be going to see the concert so I had to really look hard at finding adequate parking.

      If you visit some websites where people promote their homes for parking spaces you can find plenty near the area. The one downside is the price you can pay which can be upwards of £20.

      Sometimes schools open up for people to park and they will always charge a set price but you need to locate these online as well. I found on the day that near the stadium some areas of business were opened up for you to drive into and they had prices for parking as well. It is just a chore to find somewhere.

      The tube and train options in terms of getting to the stadium are good but prices and also how far you need to walk might put people off. You have at least a mile to walk if you get the tube or visit one of the train stations nearby such as Richmond. This is why this stadium can be complicated to park and get too especially if you have someone who is disabled in some way.

      ~~~ The Stadium and Eating ~~~

      The stadium is huge instantly from the outside is looks enormous but it also looks old fashioned in my view. I had to walk around the stadium to find the entrance I needed to visit for the concert and as you walk around you do see areas which perhaps show how old the stadium truly is.

      The parking was easy to see outside the stadium and the fun part was some homes where opening up hotdog stands for people to buy so whether these were the owners of the homes or people paying to use their land is anyone's guess.

      Inside the stadium your greeted with a search as is common practice now and I again had to unscrew the cap from my bottle and enter with a drink which could spill at any time which is just so annoying but I see why they do this for security measures.

      Inside the stadium the place was very clean and tidy and you had plenty of places to visit the toilet so this is good especially if you have an interval and everyone is rushing to use the facilities.

      I found it weird inside the stadium that they had places to eat and drink but little in terms of places to sit down and eat. Compared to perhaps Wembley stadium which I have been to a few times which has seating this venue seemed to offer very little.

      The seating was plastic but very uncomfortable after a short while because you need to have more leg room. I found myself trying to put my leg over the person next to me often because it was so compact in the area we were sat which was frustrating.

      ~~~ Atmosphere and Staff ~~~

      The atmosphere was loud but not to the point where you couldn't hear yourself think. I had sat down and when the concert did begin you could hear noise from the fans singing away but it was not as loud as I expected it to be.

      I think the stadium perhaps is not the best for creating sound during the concert and perhaps if the seating all around was used the volume and atmosphere would have been better. The stadium was half empty due to the stage being so big and taking up half the stadium and seating.

      I found the staff very pleasant and with me being a bit dumb when it comes to finding my own seats they escorted me directly to them without any fuss. You can find at some venues the staffs gets very agitated with you for asking for help so I found them very pleasant.

      I perhaps would have liked to have more around at the end of the concert because it seemed some people needed help on where to go and the staff seemed to disappear almost like they wanted to avoid the amount of people demanding help from them.

      ~~~ My Visit ~~~

      When I found out the gates opened at 4.30pm for this event I left my home at 2pm and because of the constant road works and delayed speed changes it meant I had to take my time getting there so I arrived at 4.30pm.

      I did book my space for someone's home and it was such a good moment to find I had booked a space right outside the stadium so it would take me just a mere 5 mins to walk up to the entrance area.
      As I approached the stadium you saw more fans approaching and to be honest I couldn't believe they had police horses because I didn't feel it was needed I did see about 8 horses or so. There was nothing about them which I found intimidating but you never knew at a venue like this.

      The stadium looked huge and it was not as if you had to climb up any steps to reach the entrances at all because it was on a level surface but it perhaps looked bigger on the outside then it does the inside. The seating was obviously going to be a problem the longer you sit.

      They had a few bands on to start with and one of those was the Darkness who were terrible and perhaps made me deaf with their poor sound and singing performances. Then came the moment Lady Gaga was about to enter which was sadly 15 minutes later than advertised.

      As she entered it dawned on me I cannot actually see her. The stage was huge and we could hear her very well but I was on the opposite side of the stadium and the television monitors they have got situated around the store to help sort of look at the performer were not great.

      We did find that during her performance she kept on speaking a lot perhaps too much about herself and although it was interesting to hear her speak about things she could have perhaps sang more songs in the meantime.

      As the concert finished it was so easy to get out and leave. They opened up doors to let us out and we found the home we parked our car at and we then sat there and waited a few minutes and we were allowed to leave.

      I have found that if you visit this venue for rugby stadium that before and after the event you can have problems leaving the stadium due to police shutting roads off so this is a warning to people. On the day I visit this did not happen and it was a pleasant journey home with no stoppages which was excellent.

      ~~~ Final Thoughts ~~~

      I found the venue in terms of atmosphere for the concert average it was not as loud as I would have hoped it would have been. I think the problem was the stage filled up the entire stadium and that perhaps drowned out the volume of noise.

      If you paid £70 which is what I did for my seat with a friend we had issues even seeing her on stage so if you were further up then we were it was like ants moving around on stage but you could hear plenty of noise.

      Parking is a major problem but so is getting there by tube or train stations. Although there are a few tube stations nearby and a few train stations you need to look carefully online before setting out mainly for the price you need to pay.

      If you want to eat there is plenty there and the staff were excellent overall in terms of attitude and helpful behaviour. I perhaps found the limited resources to sitting down a problem but if you're like me and enjoy eating your food quickly than your be alright.

      Overall it was a pleasant experience just wish the ticket was half the price for what I did see.

      ~~~ Stadium Information ~~~

      Address -

      Whitton Road
      Twickenham
      London
      England
      TW2 7BA
      http://www.rfu.com/TwickenhamStadium

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        19.03.2011 18:47

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        I've been to Twickenham for 7 rugby fixtures involving England and I have to say it's perhaps the worst large stadium for crowd atmosphere and game experience I have ever been to. I have been to many large sporting events on both sides of the Atlantic and "Twickers" is as dead as they come. No noise, no passion - no point. Makes the old Highbury (library) seem like Camp Nou or Lambeau Field in comparison.Maybe it's all the prawn sandwiches and Pimms.

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        24.05.2010 15:56
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        A good all round venue. Will be going there again hopefully.

        My husband and I have just got back from the Rugby Sevens at Twickenham, and being as we have spent two days there I thought it would be good to review it.

        I got tickets for the sevens from Ticketmaster and I could pick the seats, but I'm not sure if every event has the same options. I would recommend sitting in either the north or south stand as they are directly behind the goals and are great seats.

        As we are from Shropshire we actually stayed in an area called Brentford, which is about a 15 minute bus ride away, but as the weather was so beautiful over the weekend we did actually walk it on the second day, it took about an hour but was very pleasant. There are buses going to Twickenham from lots of areas so it's very easy to get to by bus, however the bus stop we stopped at was a short walk (5-10mins) from the stadium.
        I believe that it would be easy to find if you were driving there too, as there are big signs everywhere, the only downside to driving is that the car park costs £25 a day.
        I think the train station is only a short distance away too.

        The stadium itself is pretty large. I think they do have music events and all sorts of other things going on there as well as sports. They have giant screens at either end of the stadium, which are great if you are sitting quite far away from the pitch as you can still see all the action. It was very easy to find our seats on both days as there are huge signs once you have entered the stadium.

        The seats at the stadium are plastic folding seats, which are generally ok, but as we were there for so long they did start to get a bit uncomfortable, especially yesterday in the blazing sun, but if you are only going for a short event they are fine. I would highly recommend taking sunscreen though, if you get good weather, as depending on where you are seated there might not be any shade available.

        There are various food and drink vendors at the stadium, and as expected they are very expensive. So I would recommend taking your own food if you can. We got 3 cones of chips and a burger from one of the stands and it cost us £14.50. The beer is sold in fairly large plastic cups and is between £4.00 and £4.50 depending on what beer you have. The food and drink vendors are mostly located outside the main area of the stadium but still inside the perimeter.

        The toilet facilities at the stadium are not great, the longer you are there the worse they seem to get throughout the day, and some do tend to have large queues. I never expected the toilets to be gleaming though, but I did cringe when I saw people walking in there with bare feet.

        The staff at the stadium all seemed very helpful and friendly. At one point we were sitting on the steps of the stand, as it was the only shade, but the steward very politely asked us to move, and we obliged. I saw a lot of people asking for directions to their seats and they seemed happy to help them out. They were also good at spotting people sitting where they didn't belong, as some young boys tried to steal the seats behind us on the second day, but the steward knew immediately that they weren't their seats, and quickly moved them on with minimal fuss.

        There is a store at the stadium which sells memorabilia, Rugby shirts and lots of other bits and bobs, it was good to have a look round, and I did buy a couple of key rings for people as they were very reasonably priced.

        I thoroughly enjoyed my time watching the Rugby sevens, the stadium was very pleasant overall and the atmosphere was brilliant. Even though there were a lot of people drinking the staff seemed to keep everyone under control. It was a brilliant weekend and I am hoping to do it again next year. I would definitely recommend Twickenham as a venue and the Rugby sevens as an event. The weather was an added bonus.

        For more information you can visit the website
        www.rfu.com/twickenhamstadium

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        04.08.2009 19:58
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        A great venue for English rugby among other events.

        Twickenham Stadium, usually known as just Twickenham, is where the England national team play their rugby matches. Is it the largest rugby union stadium in the United Kingdown by a fair distance and holds a maximum capacity of a massive, 82000, after being redeveloped recently. It is based in the borough of Richmond Upon Thames in London and is only behind Wembley Stadium in terms of the biggest UK stadiums. As well as hosting England matches and other selected Rugby matches, Twickenham has also hosted live music events including bands such as Iron Maiden, The Rolling Stones and the band I went there to see, Bon Jovi.

        Getting to the ground was fairly easy in my opinion for a large venue although I must stress, I have never took the train to get there as there is a suitable bus route from where I live. You can get main line trains to Twickenham Station which would leave you a short walk from the station. When I went to see Bon Jovi and a Rugby Union match the crowds were fairly decent. There were a lot of people but I allways felt like I could keep moving and progressing at a good pace. It is slightly harder getting out the ground but you still keep progressing so it is not so bad. It is much easier compared to the larger Wembley Stadium.

        Around the stadium is more of an outside complex with food and drink areas all around the stadium. If you're old enough you may spot someone carrying a backpack of beer ready to sell to you on the spot. The stadium has great facilities and has a very safe look about it from the inside. Once inside the stadium it feels as if the lower tier of the stadium, particularly at the front is very low as if the seats are sunbeds getting higher as the rows goes up rather than seats. There was a time recently when the south stand was knocked down recently which seemed very strange when attending at the time seeing three massive stands and one in development. Since February though that stand has been raised to complete the look of the stadium. The stadium carries a great atmosphere for rugby games with spectators being allowed to drink, which you can not do at a football match. You feel reasonably close to the pitch which is nice and feel like you can get involved in the action. When i went to see Bon Jovi, among many middle aged man, one of the rubgy goals was replaced with the stage with the rest of the floor space being used for the public with a bar put in place where the other goal would be.

        Twickenham is the home of The World Museum of Rugby and covers world rugby and also holds various exhibitions. If you would like a tour they run four times in a day between Tuesday and Saturday and they run just twice on a Sunday.

        Twickenham Stadium is a fantastic venue and one English Rugby fans should be proud to call their home.

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          28.05.2009 12:53
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          One of my favourite stadiums

          I am lucky enough to have a father who bought a debenture for Twickenham over 10 years ago which gives him the right to buy tickets for every game there, so I have been a regular visitor to Twickenham for many years.

          I visited the stadium this weekend for the International Rugby Sevens and thought that it was about time that I wrote a review.

          Location and transport links
          The stadium is in Twickenham (although almost as close to Whitton as Twickenham itself). It is accessed by car (not recommended - parking is usually at least £15 per match if not £25 and the traffic in the area is shocking!

          You can get the train to Twickenham, Whitton or St Margarets Stations and walk (around 15 minutes walk from each). Or get a bus to Twickenham. I would always recommend not driving to a match as you can do a pub crawl through Twickenham town sharing banter and beers with the opposition fans (immediate difference to football where the fans want to kill each other!)

          It is also great fun walking to the ground with the crowd. It is amazing how many locals open up their front gardens selling food for hungry match attendees! Generally good quality and cheaper than in the ground - especially the kids selling home made cakes!

          Ticket Prices
          Vary from match to match - the sevens cost £10 for adults £5 for kids on the first day and £15/£10 on the Sunday which is very cheap. Harlequins also hire out the stadium for a "big game" just after Christmas - again this year tickets were £10 - £20 and you could take a family of 5 for £50 pounds which was great.

          International games ARE expensive - tickets go from £60 - £90 per game.

          Concerts vary depending on who it is and the seats that you get. Expect to pay £30 - £100 per ticket.

          Events
          Twickenham of course mainly hosts rugby - large club games, internationals, the sevens, the varsity match and the inter service games.

          It also holds various pop concerts over the summer - I have seen The Rolling Stones and U2 there.

          Facilities
          The stadium seats 82000 people so is well fitted out. There are lots of toilets although of course there is the obligatory queue for the ladies. Top tip - head up the stairs to the middle or upper tiers as the queue for the ground floor loos is always ridiculously long!

          There are a number of bars around the ground. Some selling just one product eg a Guinness bar selling Guinness and bottle bars selling bottles. The range of drinks is OK - Bitter, Lager, Guinness, wine, soft drinks. Pints and bottles are around £3.50 - expect to pay £5- 7 for wine. Not cheap but typical stadium prices.

          Food is available from a large number of outlets. A huge range of products is available including burgers, chips, fish, curry, pizza, sweets, baguettes and pies. The Aussie Pie company does a great pie, mash, peas and gravy deal if it is cold.

          The stadium is fully seated - the seats are actually quite comfortable for a sports stadium - I didnt get a numb bottom sitting for the best part of the day on Saturday!

          There is good disabled access - but only on the ground level - but I think that you can specifically book disabled seats.

          In the new south stand there is a huge merchandise shop and a smart hotel - very expensive on match days!

          There is also the Museum of rugby which is open (but not on match days). It is really interesting and can be visited in conjunction with a stadium tour. You get to go to the changing rooms and onto the pitch - definitely worth while!

          Atmosphere
          Historically the Twickenham crowd has been very quiet - if you pay the £25 to park in the official Twickenham carpark then people have picnics - but we are talking very posh picnics here. No Asda multipack crisps - very much posh cheeses and nice wines. THe crowd have got much more vocal over the years and of course if the opposition is a southern hemisphere team expect some noisy fans. Despite that it is very friendly - even in the hardest fought game fans all sit side by side and while there may be a little banter there is rarely any trouble. Definitely a great family day out.

          Overall
          A great stadium - slightly expensive but if you pick your event carefully there are value for money days to be had and some world class rugby to be seen!

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            14.01.2009 16:09
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            Good venue, family friendly stadium

            As other reviewers have covered the stadiums history I will focus this review on the 'Match Day' experience. I have been to Twickenham to watch games or rugby and concerts. I have sat on 3 sides (not the new south side yet) and at all levels and on the pitch during a concert.

            As a rugby venue I think it is fair to say it the home of rugby and is a stadium built exactly to fit the bill. One of the great things about Twickenham is the way that it doesnt matter where you are sat it is nearly impossible to have a terrible view of the action. You can get fairly close to the action or you could be up at the top with an overview of the whole pitch. The higher up you are the better the view of the pitch for obvious reasons, and even when at the top you feel close enough to hear the noises the pack makes and also crunching hits. I really recommend this as a sporting venue as there is something about the place which allows it to have a totally different atmosphere from any where else. All the seats are coverered with roofing so there is some protection from bad weather, but this also has the effect of allowing the atmosphere to build especially during an England international with upwards of 80000 people singing in unison. The roof keeps the noise in and allows it to reverberate around the stadium building the atmosphere even more.

            During concerts they tend to have the stage towards the newly developed South End and only have the biggest bands with big screens and bigger stages so everyone can see. I sat at the furtherst point from the stage during a Police concert and could still easily see the stage and band members walking around on it without too much difficulty, with brillaint sounds quality. As the seating at the stadium is roofed, it allows the noise of the band and the crowd to stay within the stadium so the sounds quality is very very good unlike some other venues where is disipates into the sky and you can hardly hear a thing.

            One area where Twickanham comes into its own is the concessions and toilets, there are numerour bars and food stalls all the way around every level of the stadium which means you shouldnt have to que forever and miss any of the action for a drink or some food. The prices tend to be standard venue prices e.g. £3.20 a pint. I found the staff to be polite and the stewards to be helpful and not obnoxious. The toilets are also in very good condition and plentiful even with hundreds of people streaming in and out of then. The RFU seem to have invested a lot of money into their showpiece stadium and I think it has really works as a venue both for rugby and concerts.

            The only drawback which I can think of is the fact that the ticket prices for some events particularly concerts tend to be very high - about £100 for seats which really should cost no more than £50.

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              28.08.2008 19:14
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              great stadium, extremely impressive

              Twickenham Rugby Stadium is the home ground of the England Rugby Union team and is where home internationals and major cup finals are held. It has recently undergone redevelopment works which has boosted the overall capacity of the stadium from 75,000 to 82,000, making it the second largest ground in the UK (wembley being the largest). The southern end of the stadium used to be smaller than the other three sides, which were triple tiered - in 2005 this stand was demolished and replaced with a stand identical to the other three sides, making the stadium fully enclosed. There were originally concerns that making the stadium fully enclosed would limit the amount of light available to the playing surface, leading to a detriment in the quality of the grass seen in other stadiums such as St James's Park and the Reebok Stadium, but this problem seems to have been resolved.

              The stadium is located in London (twickenham) and is in the London Borough of Richmond, only about 25 minutes drive from my house. Although the stadoium is so close I have only ever been there twice and i'm afraid to say i'm yet to see a home international match - i've seen the Middlesex Sevens and visited the stadium as part of a guided tour. The first time i visited was back in 1995 before the redevelopment. Having seen the before and after i have to say it looks far more impressive. The stadium now appears alot larger and more pleasing on the eye now that it is symetrical.

              In addition to being used for sports matches the stadium is occasionally used for concerts - i believe R.E.M. are playing here in August.

              I would definately recommend a trip to Twickers.

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                15.06.2008 17:54

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                a good place to watch rugby

                This is probably the most famous rugby stadium in the world and holds great prestige in the world of not only rugby but also live events. I have been to a fair few games here and believe that although it is a great ground i still have reservations about it. Firstly the bad stuff, it is quite difficult to get to compared with other ground in London, like Wembley say, and is a bit of a trek for the nearest station. Also the seats are pretty crammed in which mean there is a steep feel to the ground, i have sat on the bottom tier and still felt miles away from the action. However it is such a great place to watch England play, the roar of 80,000 fans getting behind the side is unrivaled in the world of rugby. The actual ground isn't brilliant but the atmosphere, and food available too, are brilliant.

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                08.08.2001 03:44
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                Twickenham is well known as the home of rugby and has a very long history behind it. I mean, it's where the RFU were formed for a start. But ever since the new stadium was built it has always said to have one thing lacking: A consistent, electric atmosphere, Some may think that my expectations for an atmosphere during rugby games, I probably do. I spent my first decade of my time on this planet walking through ghost towns on Saturday afternoons (I lived in South East Wales) Down there rugby (union) is huge, each age group in the mini rugby teams has about thirty members in it's squad, whereas here it's fortunate of a club to have enough for a team. But I'm straying away from the point, I'm just trying to say that I'm used to an electric atmosphere at rugby games, especially internationals, and that Twickenham has often dissapionted me. I'm not saying that it's a concrete brick, (as many of the Welsh refer to it as) it gets a fantastic atmosphere for the 'big' games. Such as playing against the big three, but it doesn't always get it for smaller games such as the six nations. Twickenham as a stadium is fantastic, I'm not denying it that, (although it could have better/larger/closer to the stadium parking physilities) there isn't a bad seat in the house, and compared to the other international stadium in London (Wembley) it is a clear winner. Even though the new Twickenham stadium is more modern than Wembley (at least the RFU could manage to build a new stadium) as you can easily tell by how efficeintly the food is served and how good the shop and tour of the museum are. (I've actually never been on the tour, but I've only heard good thinghs about it) Twickenham is clearly a world class stadium with a lot of history: But is the history enough if you don't always get the atmosphere?

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                31.10.2000 01:54
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                I’ve been wanting to write an opinion on Twickenham for a long time, but have never been to see a game there. On Saturday 28 October 2000, history was made. Twickenham, home of the plummy accent, tweed jacket, public school tie and all the other irritations that get up my noise – did something really radical. They allowed the first game of Rugby League to be played on the hallowed turf. Yes – Rugby League – cloth caps, funny northern accents etc. After 105 years of persecuting/ignoring the professional code – Twickenham finally accepted it and allowed the first game to be played there – England versus Australia. And what a load of old of baloney it was too. England splashed about for 80 minutes and were beaten 22-2. What a great start to the Rugby League World Cup! With my visit to Twickers and recollections of a tour around the ground 3 years previously – I think I have enough stuff for my opinion. Twickenham is the home of the Rugby Football Union (or RFU for short). It was formed on 26 January 1871 in London to agree upon a ‘standard’ set of rules. Scottish members of the RFU challenged their English counterparts to a match in 1871 and as a result of this the Scottish Rugby Union (SRU) was formed in 1873, followed by the Irish (IRU) in 1879 and the Welsh in 1880 (WRU). There is no such thing as the English Rugby Union – the RFU claim the name, as they were the first. The next momentous occasion was the ‘great schism’ of 1895. Rugby Union was started as a public school sport but as time went on, it was paid by northern working class men who wanted compensation because they had to give up some of their pay to travel to and play in matches. They wanted ‘broken time’ payments. This caused a great deal of consternation in the RFU as they believed in amateurism plus they didn’t like these northern types who did manual jobs. The RFU instigated a
                ‘witch hunt’ and persecuted (through fines and expulsion) anyone who dared to be paid in money or kind. The northern clubs tried to get the rules changed but in August 1895, a decision was made by 22 clubs to breakaway from the RFU and form the Northern Union. The NU in 1922 became the Rugby League. Rugby Union kept up its amateur ethos (called ‘shamateurism’) despite turning a blind eye to money stuck in boots and all those other practices it attacked the northern clubs over. If you ever played Rugby League – you were expelled. Hence the number of pariahs created when men from Union when ‘north’ e.g. Jonathan Davies, Martin Offiah, Scott Gibbs and Scott Quinnell. In 1996, there was so much shamateurism in the southern hemisphere that Union went professional. The barriers between Union have come down and now Union seems to want to emulate League by buying up its players and coaches. Can you see why League fans get upset? In terms of turning professional, Rugby League was 101 years ahead of Union! Back to Twickers. The first ground was built between 1907-9 on 10 acres of market garden near the town of Twickenham. The idea was instigated by a chap called William Williams and was known locally as Billy Williams’ cabbage patch. The first match was played there on 1910 between England and Wales. The best way to see Twickers is on its excellent Stadium and Museum Tour. A ticket will cost you £5 per adult and there are cheaper tickets for families and children. Details can be found on the RFU web-site www.rfu.com/twickenham/tours. I went around in December 1997 in a party of about 8 along with our own tour guide – some retired General-chappy who knew his stuff. The tour lasted 1.5 hours and we saw everything including the changing rooms, hospitality suites, executive meeting room, bars etc. We even stood on the ground – but not the hallowed turf. Admission even gets you into the
                museum where there are loads of artefacts. They even keep the Calcutta Cup there. Finally there is the Shop. Here you can buy your Lawrence Dallaglio Rugger kit, 6 nations stuff and the video of the last game they won against decent Southern Hemisphere opposition (the video is pretty old). As a league man, you’ve got to be impressed and I found it excellent value for money. Lets get back to the match. To get to Twickers, you take a train from Waterloo running via Richmond. The station was packed when we got there and you squeeze up the staircases and out of the ground. It is quite a trek to the ground – further than from Wembley tube to the twin towers. Near to the ground, the Police direct those wanting the north and east stands up 1 street and those for the south and west up another. Having navigated the A316 (the Police luckily stop the traffic), you spot the ground rising amongst all the houses. It is really impressive. My friend had exchanged out tickets for something less wet and I struggled to find Block 242. In fact I wandered around the whole of the ground until I found it ten minutes into the game. Climbing up 3 sets of stairs, I arrived. Behind the goal posts on the south side. Superb view – but bloody cold. I imagine supporters of the 6 nations in January wrap up very warm. What was great was the lack of obstructions and the ample legroom (see my Wembley opinion). The seats were okay – but were uncomfortable by the second half. Come the final whistle, we were frozen and we staggered down the steps – disillusioned and cold. We had parked the car at the Stoop – home of the Harlequins Rugby Union Club. The cost of this privilege - £10! Car parking around Twickenham is at a premium. It is after all a residential area and most streets are barracked off. There is a huge area on the north side of the ground where you see spectators eating and drinking champagne and smoked salmon before 6
                nations games. However this was a League match and any car venturing out there that night would have got stuck in the muck (that sounds like a familiar opinion!) As a ground, it beats the existing Wembley stadium hands down. Getting to the ground isn’t bad – but it’s quite a walk. This is the last time I will visit Twickers for a long time because it’s next to impossible to get a ticket for a decent Union match unless you belong to a Rugby Union club – through whom tickets are distributed. At least you can buy a League ticket through the Box Office. But that’s another reason why I prefer League !!!!

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