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Lurrpak Slightly Salted Butter

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5 Reviews

Brand: Lurpak / Type: Dairy

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    5 Reviews
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      27.10.2009 21:32
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      Tasty full flavoured butter

      Whenever i buy lurpak im always reminded of that little white man furiously playing his trumpet (or was it a trombone). I always liked those adverts and happily, i like the product to. Its always got to be butter over margerine for me anyday and lurpak is a great butter.

      This is a really creamy, rich tasting butter and is best served in a ham roll with nice chewy bread. You can use it in baking as well although i havent yet.

      It comes in a grey, wrapper with the product name printed in blue accross it. It contains

      no hydrogenated fats, and is kosher to (oy vavoy!)

      As with all butters, there is one major drawback. It is impossible to spread right out the

      fridge, you can end up murdering a perfectly innocent piece of bread by stabbing huge holes

      into it if your not careful. Try and get as thin a scraping on your knife as possible and

      dont spread straight from the fridge, give it a few minutes. This downside is not peculiar

      to Lurpak and ive attempted to spread harder butters in my time.

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      13.07.2009 15:09

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      The best butter!

      In these days of "healthy options" i think that this is one staple product in your fridge that you cannot argue with. I have tried other butters or margarines but i'm sorry they just do not compare!. Lurpak has such a distinctive flavour that immediately lets you know that you are eating luxury. And that is the same whether you like the original or the one with less salt. Unlike its margarine substitutes this is great in cooking or sauces. Margarine or cheaper butters just dont add the same flavour. If you have gone to the trouble of cooking yourself a jacket potato in the oven, so that the skin is nice and crispy, why would you spoil it by putting on something that tastes like plastic. No! Lurpak it is! Ok so if you want to be healthier then don't put quite so much on your jacket spud or don't spread quite so liberally on your bread, and also remember that not all fats are bad for you!.

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      12.11.2008 17:26
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      Best of Danish......

      Whilst making the sandwiches this morning, almost inevitably the butter ran out........As I reached into the fridge for a new pack of Lurpak it set me thinking just how long this has been a staple in our household. I think we must have been introduced to Lurpak in the early 1970's and it has been a favourite ever since.

      In its 250g form (which weighs just over half a pound in old money) it comes in a distinctive silver foiled pack with an impressive crest , which for once is not the Royal Coat of Arms. In fact it's the Lurmark, a trade mark introduced in 1901 for certified and quality Danish butter. A greaseproof lining paper sits inside the foil, ensuring that none of the product seeps out. This classy packaging has remained very similar over the years since it was introduced to the UK market, at a time when our more familiar British and New Zealand brands were packaged in rather bland and boring pastel coloured greaseproof trappings. Not surprising then that Lurpak arrived with a bit of zing. At the time there was also a Danepak offering, sold in a gold foiled wrapper, equally classy, but the butter was yellower than Lurpak and more non-descript, so like many other brands this has now faded from our shelves.

      I am guessing the reason for the sudden upsurge in Lurpak imports was the Uk's desire to avoid the then Common Market, so we entered into all manner of trade agreements with Scandinavian countries, much to the detriment of our existing trade with Australia and New Zealand. Britain became the major export market for Lurpak butter.

      Why did Lurpak make such an impact?

      The early Lurpak I remember was very pale in colour and much harder than our usual New Zealand butter. Almost straw coloured , it was slightly salted, with a rich creamy taste, never slightly rancid or on the turn as butter in a butter dish tended to become. I now understand that this was because the process used for Lurpak was different to what I had grown up with. In keeping with many modern butters today, Lurpak is a cultured butter, which means that the cream is actively fermented before it is pasteurised, giving richer flavours than the more traditional route of allowing the cream to naturally sour before processing. Both routes allow for the addition of salt which acts a s a preservative and helps prevent further decay of the finished product. Uncultured butter is still the market leader in the USA where sometimes it is referred to as Sweet Butter. Curiously it is still common to add salt to this type of butter to both add taste and preservative. Butter can readily be stored in a fridge for a month at least if it is slightly salted. We keep our ready use butter outside of the fridge in an insulated dish otherwise it is a total pain to spread this relatively hard butter. Since it contains 80% butterfat Lurpak is qualified to be a termed a butter!!

      The colour also intrigued me, the richer yellow colours are thought to naturally come from beta carotene or chlorphyll compounds found in rich grazing pasture. Again this stacks up with origins from the warmer, lusher antipodean climates than the Nordic ones, where often cattle would be fed on hay or dried feeds significant parts of the year. It does not explain though why the Lurpak we enjoy today is definitely more yellow than I recall that it was. The pack claims to have no additives, and trumpets rigorous quality control and testing, so perhaps more of the compounds get through in animal feeds today then yesteryear. Other cheaper brands may add annatto or beta carotene (Vitamin A) to artificially colour their products.

      Is it worth the price?

      A 250g pack retails at between £1.00 and £1.36 depending on supermarket whims and competition, so its well worth stocking up when the price drops. Larger 500 g packs are available but unfortunately these do not fit in my butter dish and the hassle of trying to dissect the pack is simply not worthwhile. In my view Lurpak still has a unique taste and texture so is well worth the extra pence over other offerings on the shelves.




      Thanks for reading

      Posted on Dooyoo and Ciao under the same author

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        06.10.2008 19:27
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        i love this as a treat

        I have tried buying butter substitutes for dietary reasons & to save some money but I have to keep going back to real butter because of it's taste.

        There are lovely yellow british butters on the market but I'm afraid I love the paler danish ones from lurpak.

        obviously butter isn't the healthiest spread as it contains so much fat & so many calories but it's gorgeous - on a freshly baked french stick, on a jacket potato, crumpets, teacakes or just on a slice of fresh bread - lovely!!

        of course you can use it in sauces and for cooking etc but personally I like to get the full taste by eating as above.

        lurpak seem to have adapted to their customer's needs as they now produce quite a variety of butters - eg ~

        - the standard foil block of unsalted
        - slightly salted
        - spreadable salted & lightly salted, unsalted
        - organic
        - garlic (lovely as garlic bread)

        they are available in tubs or blocks - I prefer the tubs as they are less messy & the butters are easier to spread straight from the fridge

        there is a website - www.lovelurpak.com which is quite interesting & provides info about the product & how it's made etc but it also has some tempting recipes which include savoury and desserts.
        I may well try some of these recipes but will buy a cheaper brand if it's going to be cooked

        I've always liked lurpak - it was our treat every christmas day morning (as kids) to have warm crusty rolls with this butter before we were allowed to open our presents - a tradition I've kept up!

        every time I have lurpak it reminds me of christmas but also of holidays in italy & france as the unsalted butters have a distinctive buttery but mellow taste.

        my husband makes fantastic basmati rice with lurpak - nothing else will do & the rice is good enough to eat on its own - no kidding!

        to be honest I only buy it for a treat now because of the price ~

        eg tesco sell tubs of 500g for £2.41 & the organic one is £1.41 for 250g & I saw some in our local convenience store for over £3 for 500g - I suppose we have to pay for quality....

        I shall continue to buy this danish butter (which, incidentally, was registered in 1901) as it's taste & quality has remained the same & it really is good butter BUT I'll buy it less often & use a cheaper unsalted one for my sauces & cooking/ baking.

        this is my plan - of course if anyone knows of any current offers.....??!!

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          06.10.2008 14:01
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          Lurpak = Quality

          Classed as a 'pale coloured lactic butter', 'Lurpak' was first made in Denmark in 1888.

          The Lurpak website - www.lovelurpak.co.uk, informs us that "Approximately 20 kg of whole milk goes into 1kg of butter. The cream that's separated off is first pasteurised before having bacterial lactic cultures added - these create the LURPAK butter".

          Like many other butters these days, Lurpak comes in an easily unwrappable foil block. This helps keep it fresher for longer than the tradition grease-proof paper wrapping. It's traditional grey, blue and red packaging makes it easily recogniseable, and houses the '1901 logo' - the date when the brand was first registered.

          Lurpak is made by 'Arla Foods' who suggest that the product has a "fresh, slightly aromatic flavour". Whilst I can taste a freshness, i'm not sure I understand the aromatic part which they speak of. However, the real reason I buy Lurpak over other brands (especially apparent in the spreadable version), is that it's creamy and great tasting.

          It's really nice to eat slapped on a French Stick, and all in all it reminds me of the traditional white butter you get with a bread selection in Italian restaurants.

          Lurpak is gluten-free and is suitable for lacto-vegetarians - but not suitable for vegans. It will keep frozen for up to three months without going off, and is suitable for cooking, baking and frying.

          It is without doubt my favourite butter, and is widely available in all supermarkets throughout the UK. Although it does cost a little more than most other brands, the flavour more than makes up for the price difference.

          Highly Recommended

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        • Product Details

          Made with fresh cream - and a sprinkling of salt - Lurpak Slightly Salted Butter has a legendary subtlety and freshness.