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Lyle's Golden Syrup

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26 Reviews

Type: Syrup

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    26 Reviews
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      27.08.2013 16:57
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      A necessary store cupboard item for all home bakers

      ===The Product===

      Metal tin of Lyles Golden Syrup.
      Abram Lyle and Sons, Sugar Refiners.
      Branding is in green and gold - has a logo of a dead lion and bees - 'Out of the strong came forth sweetness'.
      454 grams.
      Partially inverted refiner's syrup.
      Produced in UK for Tale and Lyle - by Royal Appointment.
      Suitable for Vegetarians and gluten free.
      100 grams is 325 calories.
      Suitable for porridge, pancakes, puddings and cakes - also for savoury dishes - recipes are on their website.

      Tate and Lyle also sell a thicker Black Treacle in a red tin.



      ===Cost===

      454 grams - £1.15 at Tesco.
      600 gram bottle - £1.89 at Tesco.
      907 grams - £1.95 at Tesco.



      ===My Opinion===

      These well known tins of Golden Syrup have been around for over 125 years and were even recognised in 2007 by the Guinness Book of Records as the world's oldest brand - quite an achievement.
      I can recall having these tins of syrup at home in the 1960s but am not sure what we used them for then - I think it was probably steamed puddings where you put a spoonful or two in the basin before cooking and them turned it out for the syrup to run all down the sides. I do remember using the syrup in sandwiches though in place of jam - very sweet and morish!
      The tins have not changed their green and gold branding and who would think when buying one that it had a dead lion on the front and a religious verse? I certainly never gave it any thought as a child. The originator, Abram Lyle, was a religious man and included a reference on the tin to an Old Testament story when Samson killed a lion.
      Tate and Lyle now also sell this syrup in easy pour bottles but for me it has to come in the traditional tins.
      There are numerous recipes on their website and the internet but I tend to stick to the traditional ways of using it - in flapjacks and banana cakes and various other sweet recipes - as well as having some on my porridge. I just love this rich and thick amber coloured liquid - it is so clear and pure and inviting - apart from being extremely sticky as well.
      I love flapjacks as they combine two of my favourite things - oats and syrup - I also like adding in loads of different dried fruits - whatever I have to hand really.
      The tin does state that syrup can be used for savoury dishes as well and I have looked on their website but I have not tried anything in that way myself.
      Whenever I have pancakes I also like a little syrup on them - not Maple syrup but good old Lyles. Adding syrup to cakes makes them lovely and moist and they do have a lovely added flavour.
      The tines have the same old sort of metal lid that you have to prise off with the handle of a spoon - and then you look into its golden depths.
      There is a 'best before' date on the lid but apparently this syrup keeps virtually indefinitely - so no problems there.
      I usually buy the smaller tins, depending on if I plan to do lots of baking or not. You only use a spoon or two at a time so the tins last well anyway. I never bother weighing the syrup out myself but have always followed what my mum used to do and just measure it with a tablespoon.
      This is a standby ingredient of any cooks cupboard and although you may not use it every week there will always be certain puddings, cakes or biscuits that you will need the odd spoonful for.
      Tesco and other producers also sell syrup these days but I must admit I have never tried any of them, as if I need syrup it is only the little gold and green tins that I will ever buy.



      ===Simple Flapjacks===

      250g Porridge Oats
      125g Butter
      125g Brown Sugar
      2-3 tbsps Golden Syrup

      Mix all ingredients together and press into a greased tin - bake at 180 degrees for about 20 minutes.
      To this you can add whatever dried fruit you have. You can also cut down on the sugar if you want as there is quite a bit of sweetness with the syrup.



      ===Star Rating===

      5 stars.



      ===Would I Recommend?===

      Yes.



      ===Website===

      www.lylesgoldensyrup.com

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        09.07.2012 20:53
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        Sticky, gooey, smooth, silky, sweet = yummy golden syrup!

        I do a lot of baking at home and I often find it quite an expensive hobby to have, especially when you go through stupid amounts of flour and sugar in a month. So with this is mind I'm always happy to buy Lyle's golden syrup to add to my cakes and flapjacks as its of excellent quality and value and has endless uses. Using it to bake is just one of them, you can use it to top cereal, porridge, your favourite dessert, yoghurt, pancakes or just to simply sweeten up your life!

        Lyle's have been providing us with their tasty golden syrup since 1881!

        ~ Product and availability ~
        Lyle's golden syrup is available to buy in most major supermarkets such as Tesco's, Asda, Sainsbury's, Somerfield, Waitrose, co-op and many well-stocked convenience stores. Lyle's original golden syrup is available to buy in two sizes of 454g and 907g. The 454g tin is on sale for around the £1.00 mark which is absolutely excellent as it lasts me ages as you don't need much because it's so sweet. Lyle's make other syrupy products too such as black treacle and their new flavoured syrups which come in several flavours such as chocolate, original, butterscotch, mint chocolate and strawberry.

        ~ Packaging ~
        Lyle's golden syrup comes in a green tin, just like the one Dooyoo are showing. Lyle's golden syrup is printed in white across a band of gold and underneath you will find the traditional Lyle's logo - the golden lion. The little tin is quite attractive and looks almost antique; it's decorated with a white lacy sort of pattern in the corners. The back of the tin gives you a little description of the syrup and gives you ideas of what you can use it for. There is also a table containing basic nutritional information. The ingredients are not listed? But I'm sure you could find them out on their website.

        ~ Taste and appearance ~
        On opening the tin (which I do find is quite a struggle and usually have to get a knife to assist me) you are greeted with a pot chock full of a gorgeously golden coloured sticky syrup. Word of warning though, make sure when you remove the lid you don't tip the tin up otherwise you will end up swimming in a pool of stickiness and a lot of mess to clean up. The consistency of the syrup is very gloopy and slides off your spoon - just as golden syrup should. It's very shiny looking too. It doesn't particularly smell of anything cold but when you heat it up you get that gorgeous burnt sugary smell; like an old fashioned sweet shop. The syrup tastes very, very sweet and is ideal for that sugar hit! It sort of tastes a bit like caramel too but even sweeter. The texture is so silky smooth and just rolls off the tongue. It is an absolute cupboard essential in my opinion.

        ~ Other information ~
        Per 100g Lyle's golden syrup contains 325 calories, 0.5g protein, 80.5g carbs and no fat. You can't really expect anything less from a product made of practically pure sugar, I think it's quite funny how they don't actually list the sugar content in the nutritional information but I think if they did they would go out of business anyway :D
        Lyle's golden syrup is suitable for vegetarians, is gluten free and contains no artificial colourings, flavourings or preservatives.

        ~ Overall verdict ~
        No flapjack is safe without a good splodge of Lyle's golden syrup! I would highly recommend this golden syrup too anybody who enjoys the sweeter things in life, you get a lot in a tin for a small price and it should last you a long time as a little goes a long way. I would also recommend this to any baker who has not yet used it in their recipes, you will notice the difference! Sometimes it just has to be brands in my opinion and I don't mind at this pretty price. Go on, give your favourite desserts/breakfasts a lift! I doubt you will be disappointed but you may be a left a little sticky...don't say I didn't warn you!

        I can't possibly give Lyle's golden syrup any less than 5 stars! I simple can't fault this product. Well done to the Lyle's!

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          07.07.2012 23:05
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          Very versatile

          Lyle's Golden Syrup is a staple in our kitchen cupboard. Great for lashing onto sweet treats, to make them even sweeter, and perfect in cooking, who could live without this in their cupboard?

          I'm not a great fan of honey, I like the sweetness it gives, but I don't really like the taste. I think this is why I like golden syrup so much, because it has all that lovely sticky sweetness, but without the bitter aftertaste that some honey has. I love having a teaspoon on my porridge in the morning, as a treat.

          A small tin costs me just under a pound from my local supermarket. I think this is brilliant value as a tin like this will last me well over a month, if I was just using it myself. However, in our house, nothing is sacred!

          The syrup itself is gold in colour and very thick. It has a treacly consistency and is very sickly sweet, which to me, is a good thing because it means that I use less each time and therefore the tin lasts longer that way.

          This is such a good buy for me because I can use it with a number of things. To name a few:
          Cakes and Baking
          On Toast (Don't knock it till you've tried it)
          On my Porridge
          On pancakes

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          26.06.2010 19:55
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          Golden Syrup

          Golden Syrup

          This is very useful to have in the larder. It can be used on porridge which I certainly like as I like the combination of the oats and the sweet taste of the syrup. I also cook with the syrup and use it again making Flapjacks and by adding the syrup it gives it a very nice texture. Use it for sandwiches and putting onto ice cream these are just a few of the things I use the golden syrup for and it has to be Tate & Lyle the other brands do not come up to the same standard as they seem to be more sugary to taste.

          I like the tin it looks very grand with the green and gold and the design on the tin has not change.
          Abram Lyle had very strong religious beliefs and it was influenced by the design which is on the tin and the trademark shows a quotation from the bible from the Old Testament in the book of Judges Chapter 14 verse 14. It was about Samson who was travelling to the land of the Philistines in search for a wife. While on his journey he killed a lion and then when he returned to same place he saw that over the carcass of the lion a honey comb formed by a swarm of bees. Samson after a while made this into a riddle ' Out of the eater came forth meat and out of the strong came forth sweetness' Then the lion and bees soon became known and recognized on the Lyle's Golden Syrup tins .

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            10.06.2010 15:55
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            The best of its kind

            This is one of my favourite all time treat!!
            I have tried the cheaper versions and the squeezy bottle version but you cannot beat Tates Golden Lyle Syrup in the Green tin!!

            This is unhealthy, high in sugarand calories and carbohydrates but so delicious it can be forgiven for those faults. It is however fat free! It is think and sweet with a lovely after taste. The taste of the original is second to none, and I don't think that the other versions are anywhere near as good as this. I was also surprised after tasting the squeezy bottle version that it is also not quite the same as the syrup in the tin! Not sure why.

            I enjoy this on porridge, and on toast. I also use it in cooking for example it is a must in flapjacks.

            The downsides are the tin lid needs prizing off, the syrup get everywhere because it's so sticky and I find the tin lid get covered in it and then is hard to clean off as it has a little rim around the edges. To combat some of the mess and to get the correct amount when cooking, I always use a spoon that I have just covered in boiling water, that way the syrup just slides of and some of the mess is avoided!!

            This is not for you if you haven't got a sweet tooth as it really is very sweet, but I find it clears up any sugar cravings I have, without a walk to the shop for some chocolate. There is also a website link printed on the tin, where you can find recipes and ideas for using your tin of golden syrup.

            Lyle's Golden syrup, is suitable for vegetarians, is gluten free and is free from artificial colours and preservatives, (so not that bad after all).

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            10.02.2010 17:17
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            Lyle's Golden Syrup - Great for the store cupboard.

            Lyle's Golden syrup is a pale treacle syrup, which was invented by Scotsman, Abram Lyle, in 1883. It comes packaged in a steel tin and has a lid which has to be levered open (I use the handle of a spoon.) The lid is then easily pushed back on.

            I have very fond memories of this syrup as it was always in my mum's store cupboard, right through my childhood. Now it is in mine!

            I use Lyle's Golden Syrup, in many baking recipes and also use it as a topping for icecream and pancakes. I used it only last week, while making some Oat Crunchies.

            *Oat Crunchies*

            50g butter
            50g margarine
            75g caster sugar
            1 teaspoon golden syrup
            3 teaspoons boiling water
            3 drops vanilla essence
            100g self-raising flour
            50g oats

            Cream the fats and sugar, beat in the syrup, water and essence.

            Stir in the flour and oats, mix well.

            Divide and shape into small balls and place on a greased baking tray.
            (If you like a really crunchy cookie, flatten these balls down a bit. If you like it crunchy on the outside, but more spongey on the inside, leave as a ball.)

            Bake in a moderate oven, 180C / 350F / Gas Mark 4 for about 15 minutes, when they should be a lovely golden brown. When they have cooled, you can decorate with icing if wished.

            *Nutritional Value Per 100g of Lyle's Golden Syrup*

            Calories - 325
            Protein - 0.5g
            Carbohydrate - 80.5g
            Fat - Nil

            Lyle's Golden Syrup is suitable for vegetarians and is free from gluten, artificial colours, flavours and preservatives.

            I buy the 454g tin in Tesco for £1.19, it is also available in a 907g tin for £1.35.

            It is a great product to keep in your store cupboard, especially if you enjoy baking. It has a long use by date and my tin is best before December 2011, so there should be no waste.

            For me, this is definately a 5 star product.

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              10.10.2009 22:10
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              not good for you but tastes great

              Lyles golden syrup is a great product for cooking and well its also a great tasting product on its own, not that I recommend it as its not that healthy.

              Golden sugar is basically a really thick treacle syrup made from pure refined sugar so as you can guess its not good for you if you eat a lot, however it is nice to have with some things and there's so much you can do with this especially if your baking.

              This goes great on pancakes which is one of my favourite things to have this on, but there is also things you can bake by using this product too. You can makes things like flapjack using this too, and of course it goes very well on porridge in the mornings as well.

              You can get a tin of this which is fairy big for about 70-80p at the supermarkets and because you don't need to use a lot of this at a time I find a tub usually lasts me several months at a time. There is not the squeeze bottles as well which makes using this product so much easier as trying to pour this onto things in the tin was like trying to pour paint without spilling it, and its quite messy to clean up too so I do advise the bottle.

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                02.10.2009 20:03
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                Gorgeous sticky syrup that lasts for ages and is reasonably priced.

                I used this syrup recently to make homemade energy bars, and some flapjacks. I have only used this syrup, no other brands, so I do not have anything to compare it to.

                I found this syrup absolutely delicious. Although I used it as part of another recipe, the taste was quite prominent despite me not using a great deal in comparison to other ingredients. This syrup was thick, sticky, and oh so sweet. The colour is fantastic too, it's a deep, rich orangy golden brown. The syrup is perfectly clear and looks amazing. The smell is out of this world, especially when it is being melted! When are Lyle's bringing out Golden Syrup room spray?

                The packaging is also great! I'm not sure when it was first made but the packaging looks a little olde-worldy and so retro! Also, the lid of the tin re fits to the tin and it lasts for ages. As the flavour is very strong it might last quite a while but you don't need to worry as it doesn't go off if the tin lid is secured.

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                20.09.2009 20:43
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                A tasty product that could seriously rot your teeth lol

                It's not very often I get a sweet tooh but when I do I'm in serious need of something severely sweet lol!

                Lyle's golden syrup has always been a favourite of mine, drizzled deeply into porridge or poured perfectly over ice cream. Mmm Mmm!

                Lyle's golden syrup comes in a dark green and shiny gold 454g tin. It's decorated elegantly and is so easy to recognise on the shelves of supermarkets. You can actually buy it in squeezy plastic tubes now too but I prefer the tins

                This syrup is;
                Suitable for vegetarians
                Gluten free
                Free from artificial colours, flavours or preservatives

                100g of this syrup contains;
                325 calories
                0.5g protein
                80.5g carbohydrate
                nil fat

                Opening the tin I am greeted by a deep orange, slightly golden transparent substance that has a sugary sweet scent that is truly unmistakeable. It is a slightly thick and not too thin syrup that does pour out quite easily, however if it drips anywhere it does become sticky. It is an extremely rich and sugary syrup that flows down your throat so smoothly, it's delicious. The sweetness is stunning and is to be expected seeing as it is made from real sugar of course.

                The extreme sweetness of this is not for the faint hearted, it's sugary naughtyness can be recognised a mile off, it's golden rich subtle yet sweet scent and gorgeously smooth taste is dreamy.

                It's actually quite a useful product, I only use it with my ice cream and porridge but it can be used with cookies, flapjacks, pancakes, waffles and sticky puds. You can actually find out many recipes on the websites www.lylesgoldensyrup.com.

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                  30.07.2009 02:12

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                  Yum yum yum

                  This cane sugar syrup tastes delicious due to the use of real sugar, not hideous sweeteners. Although high in calories...coming to about 325 cals per one hundred grams, this is one sugary treat that is very very versatile!

                  It is suitable for vegetarians and I mostly use it in cakes. My favourite use is in Anzac Biscuits, as it gives the porridge oats a kick and makes them deliciously gooey. This works in ginger cake as well, as it gives the cake a wonderfully soft, sticky top.

                  Thick and creamy, it is difficult to pour, but use a spoon and this works on pancakes, with a touch of sugar, or a personal favourite, on vanilla icecream.

                  But what I use it most for is on a piece of white bread, toasted before if preferred. A perfect breakfast and one without even any added flavourings or preservatives. What more could you ask for?

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                  23.07.2009 15:15
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                  Lovely, thick, moist syrup!

                  I really do adore syrup! I love it in porridge and on pancakes even occasionally on ice cream and the other day I splodged some on my dried up old muesli and added milk to it (that worked for me really well! lol).

                  We always have a can of this in our cupboard because I'm crazy for the stuff!

                  The Packaging:

                  454g Gold and dark green can with a silver lid to the top of it that pulls off and on and the best before date is clearly stamped on there. On the front of the can there is a white and gold pattern and I'm told it is Lyle's Golden Syrup 'Abram Lyle & Sons Sugar Refiners' and the size is stated along with a drawing of a lion to the centre of the can. On the back of the can I'm told a bit about the product, ingredients and nutritional information is stated, the recylcle symbol is displayed and finally there is a bar-code on there. It looks an old fashioned type of can due to the pattern and it's informative.

                  A Bit About The Product According To The Back Of The Can:

                  Enjoy a little taste of yesterday today with Lyle's Golden Syrup. It's unmistakable flavour is delicious on porridge and pancakes and great in flapjacks, sticky puds, cakes and cookies. Lyle's Golden Syrup is surprisingly tasty in savoury dishes too

                  Suitable for Vegetarians.
                  Gluten Free.
                  Free from artificial colours, flavours & preservatives.

                  The Syrup Itself:

                  Wonderful! Dark yellow and transparent in colour it's very sticky and looks thick when you take some out. It doesn't pour too well out of the tin because of thickness however add some via a spoon to where you want it and it goes to where you want it thick but you can direct it thinly and it goes onto food as a light yellow colour.

                  It is very sticky indeed, this is so sweet but amazingly tasty. Made with natural sugar opposed to nasty tasting sweeteners it has a glossy and melting feeling in the mouth and a slight tangy harshness to it from said sugar!

                  It's delicious and and not just how I usually use it on my pancakes and stuff it really is great to cook with as well. Not greasy so you can cook with it, and if you cook with it it holds moistness and toughens up to give a slightly chewy, sugary taste to food.

                  For me this reeks of quality, tastes amazing on every level and it severely yummy! Recommended from me highly!

                  Nutritional Information Per 100g Serving:

                  Energy: 325 Kcal
                  Protein: 0.5g
                  Carbohydrate: 80.5g
                  Fat: Nil

                  Available in all good supermarkets my can cost me £1.29 in Sainsbury's and also is available in a squeezy tube!

                  This review is also posted on Ciao under this same username.

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                    17.07.2009 08:40
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                    Very necessary for cake and biscuit makers!

                    Golden syrup looks great. It has in interesting heavy texture and I'm having an interesting moment imagining myself lying in a bath of it; kind of dreadful and wonderful in one go.

                    This however, is not what I usually use it for. I like to make cakes and biscuits and as a vegan don't always find the ones I want. For example, I was in Grassmere recently and I went into that little gingerbread shop (the one with the ladies in victorian costumes), lured in by the smell. There was a queue so I didn't wait to ask my question which was, 'Is it dairy free?' I knew the answer anyway. Generally, If I fancy something specific I have to make it myself. When I arrived back home, I made myself some ginger biscuits so I did not feel deprived.

                    Packaging
                    -------------

                    I love the appearance of the tin that I have in my cupboard - which is the large one (907g). It is a lovely, old fashioned green, black and gold design which has been the same for as long as I can remember. It has the picture of the lion (dead) with the bees buzzing around him and coming out of him and the motto, 'Out of the strong comes forth sweetness'. I think I can vaguely remember how the story goes - the bees make a hive in the lion. This is a little improbable and, thinking about it the motto is a bit macabre and a bit nonsense.

                    The tin is made of steel and has a lid that you need to lever off with a knife or a spoon handle (when you have removed the security plastic wrapper).

                    Golden Syrup can also be bought in smaller tins (454g - 95p) and in plastic bottles. This is called 'pouring syrup' - it is a little easier to pour (454g -96p).


                    Ingredients
                    ---------------


                    Sugar. (Pure cane sugar)

                    The manufacturers information details a huge (almost laughable) list of allergy advice:

                    'Free From Additives, Free From Artifical Sweeteners, Free From Artificial Colour, Free From Artificial Flavours, Free From Artificial Preservatives, Free From Aspartame, Free From AZO Colours, Free From Benzoate, Free From BHA/BHT (antioxidants), Free From Coconut, Free From Egg, Free From Genetically Modified Ingredients, Free From Gluten, Free From HVP, Free from Lactose, Free From Maize, Free From Milk, Free From MSG (Glutamate), Free From Nuts, Free From Pine Nuts & Kernels, Free From Sesame Seeds, Free From Shellfish, Free From Soya, Free From Sulphur Dioxide, Free From Tartrazine, Free From Wheat, Free From Yeast, Kosher, No Added Salt, Not Tested on Animals, Suitable for Vegans, Suitable for Vegetarians'

                    I find it a little amusing that a product of 'pure cane sugar' must declare itself 'free from nuts'.

                    Anyway, I can rest assured that it has undergone no processes that involve animal ingredients.

                    It has 325 calories per 100g (unsurprisingly high calories).

                    Appearance
                    ---------------

                    On opening the tin, you are greeted with a wonderful smell which instantly makes me want to eat (this is because I used to have it on porridge). In the silver of the tin's inside, the syrup is clear and golden. When a spoon is dipped in to remove some, you can feel that it is an incredibly viscous material as there is resistance to the spoon. It is also hard to get off the spoon; it takes a while to drop off and the residue is hard to get off. It can be made easier by shoving it into your mouth and licking it off!

                    When heated, the syrup will become runnier which makes it easier to mix with fat and stir into gingerbread recipes.

                    Taste
                    -------

                    A full, rounded taste is what you get if you do shove that spoon into your face. You can tell that it is cane sugar because it does not taste of pure sweetness. I have drunk sugar cane juice in the caribbean and golden syrup retains some of this taste.

                    When used in cookery, this syrup makes ginger biscuits have a great texture (crisper the longer you cook them) and in cakes it gives the sponge an enjoyable heavy consistency that suits more substatial cakes.

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                      09.07.2009 19:55
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                      My grandad used to always have this on his toast in the mornings, and still does. He has had this habit for at least the last 15 years, and in the times I've been in his company at breakfast time, I have hooked on to this too! I went off it for a while however, but a few months back, I decided to retry!


                      I opened the lid and was immediatly hit by a strong syrup smell. it caught the back of my nose making me sniff. This was obviously very strong stuff. PING, my toast popped out and it was time for the taste test. I dipped in my knife and took out a big scoop and spread it onto my peices of toast. I could still get the strong sugary smell and I couldnt wait to taste.
                      It spreads easily on to the toast!

                      The syrup comes in various forms; a glass bottle, a squeezy bottle, or the regular metal tin! We tend to buy the metal tin as it seems more authentic and I think it is better value for money personally. The main colour of the tin is a shiny green with golden patterns on it. The brand name and product information is written on in gold, shiny writing too. To open it you have to remove the metal lid however this is fairly easy to do but sometimes requires a bit of strength!

                      i bit into the toast, and wooow, this really was strong stuff. It was absoloutly delicious though. It tasted very very sweet, almost too sweet, but not quite. It didnt really taste of anything that i could recognise. But boy did i enjoy it. It left a very very sweet aftertaste in my mouth and made me feel quite thirsty in the end.

                      The syrup comes in a 454g jar which costs 95p or a 907g jar which costs £1.44. You are as well going for the larger jar as you will save a little bit of money. The original 454g bottle costs 96p so again price wise in order to save 1p you are better going for the jar. The squeezy bottle is 350g and costs 89p! All in all you are better going for one of the jars!

                      Per 100g there are 325 calories!
                      I will definitly be having syrup on toast again in the near futre....mmm....perhaps il go make some now. And i can reccomend this to anybody who has a sweet tooth.

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                      28.03.2009 16:36
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                      A good quality golden syrup

                      This is one of those things that I always have in my cupboard as I use it quite often in cooking.

                      I have used a couple of own brand syrups but still keep coming back to Lyle's. I find that it has a much smoother flavour than some of the other versions. It is also a little thicker in consistency than some others.

                      The only part of this product that I don't like is the lid. It is set into the top of the tin and so you need to lever it off either by a teaspoon or coin. I found then that the syrup sticks in the ridge around the top of the tin and is next to impossible to keep clean. I also find it more difficult to reseal. I would be much happier if it was just a screw top lid.

                      I find that if I keep a spoon in hot water for a few minutes before I need to scoop the syrup out it is much easier to put in the syrup and it slides off much more easily.

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                        05.03.2009 22:48
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                        If you haven't had it in a while, try it again with the new bottle

                        If there is anyone out there that has not tried golden syrup then you need to get out of your cave and to your nearest supermarket to purchase this divine nectar. What has changed about golden syrup that makes this well known product worth reviewing?... the bottle!

                        The Bottle:
                        This product now comes in a plastic squeezy bottle with a hinged cap. On most other products that have followed a similar idea such as Heinz Ketchup and HP Sauce this is very useful, but not quite earth-shattering. Due to the extremely thick nature of golden syrup this ergonomic improvement means that golden syrup is now on a whole new playing field.
                        I cannot imagine I was alone in despising the hassle involved in having to dip a spoon into that big pot and two weeks later having the first drip come off the spoon. Then waiting another age until the required amount has dripped off, then losing patience and having to transfer the spoon back to the pot with the syrup still dripping off, therefore covering your pristine work surface in a sticky mess. Not only that but the syrup always seems to get on the outside of the pot, and the bottom, and drip down once you put it back in the cupboard, leaving your cupboards looking like they've been hit by slimer from Ghostbusters.

                        Now there is no mess, no fuss, just pure squeezy joy. This saves me approximately two minutes of effort a year, I know this doesn't seem a lot but I am extremely lazy, if I could find a way not to breathe and keep on living I would jump at the chance.

                        The Taste:
                        Golden syrup is of course extremely sweet, being pure refined sugar, so if you are one of those people who prefers savoury food then steer well clear of this product. It is hard to actually describe the taste for me in any comparitive way. Personally I find that golden syrup blows maple syrup and treacle out of the water in terms of taste. Maple syrup is sweet without that deep intensity of flavour, and treacle is just too sickly.

                        The nutrition:
                        Well it's just sugar! According to the label there are 77g of carbs per 100g, which I must confess leaves me a little confused about what the remaining 23g are because they don't seem to be accounted for. Perhaps they put 23g of love and good wishes in each pot and just don't want to boast about it.

                        What do I eat it with?
                        My mouth of course! But seriously, one of my my favourite breakfasts is porridge with lashings of golden syrup. I find that to my taste unless I go bonkers with the syrup I also need to add a little sugar, and a straw in the shape of a flamingo.
                        But the real apotheosis of golden syrup uses is on pancakes. I cannot tell you how much I love a pancake with golden syrup, it just seems to be two things that work in perfect harmony, like strawberries and cream, like Simon and Garfunkel, like poor economic decisions and Labour governments.

                        The dosh:
                        My 454g squeezy bottle set me back 99p which I thought was quite a bargain. I fully expected it to be £1.50 or so considering the recent hike in food prices. This should last me many months as a little of this stuff packs a big punch and goes a long way.

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                      • Product Details

                        Cane sugar syrup can be used in place of other liquid sweeteners (honey, corn syrup, molasses, etc.) Lyle's is an excellent glaze, topping, spread or substitute. Very versatile, indeed. Can be used as a substitute for corn syrup in cooking and baking