Welcome! Log in or Register

Law At University of Nottingham

  • image
3 Reviews
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    3 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      13.05.2013 19:18
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      i was desperate to come to this university for about a year and i'm so glad i'm here now

      I'm currently in my first year at Nottingham studying Law LLB. I spent a lot of time looking around the for the best universities for this course as, with Law, it's not really the course but the university's reputation, since to get a qualifying degree each student has to pass 7 compulsory modules anyway (Contract, Tort, Public, Criminal, EU, Equity & Trusts, Land).

      I picked Nottingham as my highest choice along with other universities such as Lancaster and York since Nottingham had the highest entry requirements (AAA and passing the LNAT). I have to say that it was annoying to have to do the LNAT since not many universities ask for it, and Nottingham was the only one that I picked that did, and costing £50, it was pretty expensive. That being said, its obviously a useful extra indicator for the university to pick students through, and there's no need to revise for it; it's based on innate skills. It does take a long time to process your results, meaning that I didn't know whether I'd gotten an offer from Nottingham until months after my other offers came through, which was pretty much the most nervous point in my life so far. Also, I think the entry requirements are going up for this coming year to A*AA (in my opinion it's hard enough to get in already!).

      Even though the fees have tripled the year I applied (how lucky for me) I do feel like the quality and standard of teaching is good: they had put on extra lectures compared to earlier years. Per week there's about 16-18 lectures, 1 seminar and 3 tutorials (alternate weeks) which is not as much as other courses: my friend does a lot more than that, but with Law, it's definitely enough work. I feel like pretty much most of my time outside of lectures is spent consolidating notes, prepping for tutorials/ seminars and reading.

      That's not to say I don't get free time though! The Law Soc organises a lot of events throughout the year from balls to nights out etc. I have been to quite a few of these but I would say that they're quite expensive, even with membership discount: the winter Law social was about £35.

      The modules that you do in the first year are Tort, Contract, Public Law and Understanding Law: they're all pretty interesting and in the first semester, not too hard to get your head around. There's definitely a big jump from the first to the second in difficulty and volume of work though! The tutorials are really useful, so go to them: if you're unsure on a topic, this is the best place to be. I've come out of so many tutorials feeling like I understand things much better than when I went in. They also set a lot of voluntary essays throughout the year so you can see your progress; they may be voluntary but it's a good idea to do them.

      I've got to mention this because it's so obvious to me: out of the 200 or so Law students there's only two people from the North - me and a girl I went to school with. There's got to be more I'm sure but I'm yet to meet them! I can't believe it's so one sided towards the South really. Also, I know this is where the jobs are but there's a lot of focus on London and corporate law when they tell us about careers, and as someone who's much more interested in Criminal Law, I do wish they told us more about that side of the Law.

      Overall, I do love studying Law at Nottingham; it's a great university with a great Law department. The lectures are interesting and pretty much essential and and the Law Soc is pretty good. The entry requirements are really high but not out of this world so if you reckon you can do it, go for it.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        08.09.2009 18:50
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        2 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        An excellent law degree at an excellent institution

        I studied at Nottingham University from 2004 til 2008 doing law, and this review is as it was then; obviously some things may have changed!

        Firstly, law is a hard degree, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. If you want to get a 2.1, unless you are insanely clever, you will need to work a harder than your hall-mates / housemates, and probably still won't get it all. The teaching at Nottingham, although by and large excellent, is still the traditional method - go to lectures, prepare for tutorials, then revise like a slave at exam time. Don't follow my example and not pay attention to your tutorial notes when revising; tutorial subjects and cases invariably came up in the exam.

        That doesn't mean you won't get a social life. The law society is excellent, and university wide, there are lots of social activities and clubs, and Nottingham is an excellent place to live in terms of the entertainment available. It's also cheaper compared to universities down south, although housing in Lenton seemed expensive compared to other University areas like Beeston and Wollaton. You also do need to be careful; it is true what they say about crime in Nottingham, and if you aren't careful, you may get burgled or mugged, especially in Lenton (so don't walk around looking like a rich toff in your Uggs on your hugely expensive mobile phone).

        In terms of the facilities available on campus, the library has recently been refurbished. My main complaint whilst I was there was that there was nowhere 'quiet' to study, and seemed to be the social hangout. However, I understand this was something they were addressing in the refurbishment completed last year, and hopefully you can now study in the library without having to listen to someone else's conversation! The availability of books for the course was rubbish except in the short loan section. I know some did get buy just using these for tutorials, however, I bought all my textbooks so I could prepare for tutorials at my own leisure, and prepare for lectures. The majority I was able to sell on after the course, and the law society organises a book sale every year.

        As far as course availability, you will be required to study the core subjects as on any LLB course; that is: Contract, Tort, EU, Criminal, Trusts, Land, and Constitutional Law, together with any introductory module. Outside of this you can study subjects such as Commercial law, Intellectual Property, Environmental law, Consumer law, and Human Rights law to name a few. You can also elect to do a Dissertation if that's your thing (I did, and it was the sole reason I managed a 2.1!). Don't expect any courses on media law or the internet just yet; I did push for one, but the university is perhaps a little too traditional to look at newly emerging subjects just yet.

        The University also offers an excellent year abroad opportunity, enabling you to do a four year degree with the third year spent at an institution abroad; any number of European universities, together with options in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Hong Kong, and America. I would thoroughly recommend applying for this opportunity (which you do at the start of second year); I went to America for a year and had an amazing time, and everyone I know who did the year abroad said the same. It also gives you an edge over your colleagues in terms of your experience, and the ability to compare with a different legal system.

        The university has excellent links with leading law firms if you ultimately want a career in the law, and holds a law fair every autumn, together with presentations by law firms. However, don't be fooled, you will still need to be an excellent 2.1 getting student for the firms to look at you, and by no means does a Nottingham law degree equal a training contract - I should know, I still haven't got one and don't anticipate on getting one now, given that in my exams I mainly got 2.2s, and this doesn't interest firms unless you are exceptional in other ways (clearly I'm not!). This situation is likely to be even more pronounced in the current credit crunch, and many of my degree colleagues who obtained training contracts have had theirs deferred for a year meaning they are having to find alternative work for a year.

        Ultimately I would recommend Nottingham to anyone, and particularly for law. The quality of teaching is, on the whole, excellent, and the degree a valuable one.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          03.08.2009 16:23
          3 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          An amazing place to study,

          I've just finished my first year studying law at the University of Nottingham. I must say that it is difficult to get a place at the uni studying law as you're required to get three A's at A Level. If you are currently studying for your A Levels and thinking about where to apply to study law, please do not be put off by the high grades needed to get in. I was very nervous about applying for my place at the University of Nottingham and did not think that I would get a place, but I went for it anywhere and I'm pleased to say that I'm very happy that I did.

          The School of Law at the University of Nottingham is an amazing place to study. You are expected to work hard during your law degree but we have a real work hard play hard moto at the School of Law.

          Edit: In order to get a qualifying law degree at any university you have to have studied and past 7 core modules which are Contract law, Tort law, Criminal law, Land law, EU law, Constitutional law and Trust and Equity law. You have approximately 16 hours lectures a week when studying law, but from what I've heard I believe that the hours of lectures are a lot less than this for the majority of other subjects.

          The social life of the university is amazing. The student union at the University of Nottingham is one of the best in the country, with hundreds of societies you can join for any interests. And freshers are in for a treat during freshers week...an amazing week of socialising ans getting to know all your fellow students by playing games, having day trips out, fantastic parties at night and student nights out in Nottingham. What more could you ask for from a University experience :-)

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments