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Chieftec Scorpio TX-10BL-D

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    3 Reviews
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      02.05.2006 16:16
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      SPACE!!!!, loosebox, small fans, small power supply, striking colours, funky door handle

      One of the most annoying things i've come across when purchasing a new tower for my obsessive hobbie (messing around with computers)is a distinctive lack of space... so it came as a pleasing change to find i had room to spare in this case even after installing my two dvd drives, 2 hard drives, 580watt power supply and a huge 7800gtx graphics card (one of the bigger ones). With the airy dimentions of :-470mm x 205mm x 522mm its not hard to see why i was so overjoyed with this case, that is until i found out the dimentions of the fans that can be fitted to this case. Now, anybody who knows anything about mixing cooling with noise level will know that the bigger the fan you use in a system the quieter the system while cooling to the same effect. its a shame then that this case has no fixtures for such a fan, two front face fixtures and two rear face fixtures both for 80mm fans each means you should be able to get the desired temperature, but will mean a making sacrifice to the noise level gods..... then theres the power supply, now in my opinion 360watts seems a little on the low side in an age booming with the power hungry pci-E graphics cards, especially if you were thinking of running an SLI or X-fire setup. i would have prefered to see at least a 450watt power supply with this case as a minimum. Thats not to say turn away from this case now, there are many other points to stress in favor of this suave loking case, *Handy door handle for opening the case (how many times have i struggled to slide the case side off when upgrading my pc. *HDD loose box, one of the best ideas, as it means no more struggleing to get the hard drive past all the other wires and devices already in there, the fitting actually detatches altogether! *optional fan fixing for the hard drive/s means u never have to worry about an overheating drive. *many striking colours to suit. all in all i'd give this case a healthy 7/10 the reason being that i would have prefered some fittings for larger fans to cut noise level, plus with pci-E graphics cards dominating the market now, i would have liked to see a higher wattage from the power supply. It seems a little low, especially if you want to use X-fire or SLI setups

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        19.12.2005 14:50
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        Big blue beast.

        I've acually got a cheiftec Dragon but they're so similar it's not worth slitting hairs. First thing about this case is the size. It's massive. Wide, deep and tall. Much taller then most computer cases. This could be a problem if you're not ready for it so remember to check the dimentions of the space you're putting it into. Comes in lots of colours. I have a blue case just like the picture. Lots of clip in fitments for 80mm fans. 2x at the front, one of which will blow over your harddrive(s), very clever (modern HD get very hot). 2x at the back just beside the CPU so you should get a good flow of air when they work with the front fans. And a 5th on the side door which blows onto your gfx card (just about). The case doesn't have any sound proofing so running 5x fans + a CPU cooler + gfx fan can get a bit noisy. Mine came supplied with a 360W good quality PSU they don't always, the PSU was worth a good 30-50% of the total cost of the case. The huge size of the case and the easy opening side door makes working inside the machine very easy. you may need to optfor longer cables just because of teh scale of the thing. It come supplied with rales for fitting CD drives etc and removable cages for 3.5" devices. I took the optional usb/firewire front panel which is expensive for what it is but it is colour matched. A really solid high quality case. I used some very expensive aluminium cases from Coolermaster and I really prefer my Cheiftec. Just don't try to pick it up fully loaded if you have a bad back. If you prefer something a bit smaller Antec cases are also very good quality.

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          10.03.2002 18:13
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          I didn't need a new case. Not one bit. I'd had my first PC for only... what... 8 months? The power supply (PSU) was making some suspicious groaning noises, so it was time to get a new one. Sure, my machine was still under warranty, but it was an off-site warranty, and rather than go through all the hassle of sending off my tower (it was a full, HUGE tower!) and doing without my PC for several weeks, I decided to take on the task myself and look for a replacement. So, I started looking around. In my travels, I discovered how wide and varied the wonderful world of the PC case actually was. It seemed that for not much more than the price of a half-decent PSU, I could end up with a new, much better looking, case to store my machine in! So that was my mind made up - new case time! I'd been reading through a review of system cases in a UK PC magazine, which is where I first discovered the marvel of Chieftec. Sure, it didn't score the highest mark in their tests, but it was still up there - the ones that out performed it were either cheap and nasty looking, or hefty aluminium cooling demons. I found several suppliers of the Chieftec cases, and eventually went along with OcUK - I'll eventually get around to writing a review of these guys once I've got a few more purchases out of them! The most recent addition to the Chieftec range was the Scorpio - I'd initially been won over by the Dragon case, but the Scorpio had a slightly different front grille (made it look less 'evil', says my girlfriend!), and the same interior. The main points that interested me were removable 3.5" drive bays, an easily removable side panel, and an nice door that hid your drive bays at the front of the machine. The range is available in several colours, which was nice to see - bog standard beige, silver, black and blue. The silver and blue models had a fan mounted in the side of the case, which was a bonus , and only cost a little more. After staring at the silver and blue cases for what seemed like an eternity, I ended up going for the blue model, and I've never looked back! Less of the story rant, and on to the nuts and bolts! What do you get in the box? The tower itself, a power cable (useless for UK users, as it was of the two pronged variety), four keys (for front and side of case - more later), rail clips for mounting 5.25" drives, and a plethora of screws and spacers for fitting things inside the case. No instructions though! I have to address the lack of instructions first - OK, if you're buying a case to fit the innards of a PC into, then you're bound to have a little experience and know-how, yes? Well, I'd never done it before, and whilst it's a challenge, it's certainly not brain surgery. Still, it would have been nice to have a few pages explaining the inside of the case, and how useful those removable drive bays, fan mountings, etc. all were. Not to mention the rail kits! Sure, I knew that you were meant to affix them to the side of 5.25" drives, but only because I'd seen it on the website! I tried lots of different ways of fitting these rails to my drives, and was frustrated when they wouldn't go in! I eventually got it sorted out, but only through trial and error. Instructions Chieftec, please! Right, onto the innards of the case. The side panel is very useful - it's secured by two thumb screws at the back of the case, and once these are released you have a handle for the side panel to release it and remove it completely. This handle can be locked, which is a nice touch. Inside the case, everything looks to have been well thought out - there are four 5.25" bays, and no less than six 3.5" bays. The 3.5" bays are in two groups of three, and you get two removable bays for them - just flick a lever, and the whole thing can be removed - excellent for fitting driv es in there! The top group of bays has blanking plates for two of the drives so they are accessible from the front of the machine for floppy drives, and the bottom group of bays has a fan mounting at the front of it, right next to one of the grilles of the machine, which can be used to cool the drives if heat becomes a problem. The aforementioned rail kits for the 5.25" bays can be stored at the bottom of the case, and there were four pairs supplied with this case. Fan-wise, the case only comes with the one that's mounted to the removable side panel, but there are mountings all over the place - one at the front of the case at the bottom (below the one for the drive bays) and two just below the PSU. It's not just a few holes and a grille thouugh - the fan mountings just need you to clip the fan into place, and you're sorted. Nice touch! Last, but by no means least, was the 340W Antec PSU that was supplied with the case - the thing I was buying in the first place! Outside, the case is primarily metal, which has been sprayed blue. It looks impressive! The front of the case has a door which covers the drives, power LEDs and power/reset buttons. The door itself is plastic, which was a bit of a let down. Once closed, there are some nice little fittings that carry the light from the LEDs inside, and a second lock for locking the door shut. Finally, four sturdy feet are fitted to the base of the case to aid stability - the case is stable enough without them, but I was quite used to them on my old case. These feet are much better than my previous ones, and don't fold in at the slightest nudge. Installing the bits and pieces of my PC into the case was nice and easy - the only problem I had was removing the steel grille from behind one of the 3.5" blanking plates for my floppy drive. The 3.5" drives are screwed in as you'd expect, and things are made easier when you can simply remove the bays and screw them in where you can access them, rather than having to huddle over the entire case. The 5.25" drives are secured in an interesting way, which parallels the removable bays for the smaller drives - you affix a rail to either side of the drive, and slide the drive into place from the front of the machine - once in place, the drive will 'click' into place, leaving a set of tabs on either side of the drive, which can be squeezed in order to remove the drive again. Nice touch! Installing the motherboard was quite easy, although the back panel wasn't quite flush with the connectors on the motherboard. So there we go! I needed a new PSU, and ended up moving the guts of my machine to a shiny new blue case! It's been in place for several weeks now, and I'm more than happy with it. I've since added a new hard drive and an IDE controller, and I didn't have to move the machine to do so - just take off the side cover, slot in the case, take out one of the drive caddies and fit the drive, and that was it!

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        • Product Details

          With a long experience and strong industrial base, Chieftec Industrial is a professional leader in manufacturing and exporting of computer case. By keeping breast of technology and willing to try the innovation, Chieftec continually improves its industrial knowledge and ultimately to assure the customers the competitive advantage, as well maintains the leading position in the computer casing industry.