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Keretapi Tanah Melayu (KTM Malaysian Railways)

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2 Reviews

Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad (KTMB) or the Malayan Railway Limited is the main rail operator in Peninsular Malaysia. Formerly known as the Malayan Railway Administration (a corporate sole established under Section 4 of the repealed Railway Ordinance 1948), it came to be known as KTMB after the government-led corporatisation in 1992. However, it remained wholly owned by the federal government. The railway system dates back to the British colonial era, when it was first built to transport tin. Fares are generally reasonable, but the low speed of the intercity trains on the narrow-gauge tracks does not usually make them competitive with other modes of transportation.

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      31.05.2005 14:06
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      The best way to travel is undoubtedly the Malaysian railway!

      I have just returned from staying in petaling jaya, by Taman jaya LRT station. It is cheap and incredibly convenient! Each day my trips would cost fewer than 2 ringitts a trip (about 33p) the train takes you on a breathtaking ride over the top of most of KL, to the centre of each subsection.

      The train is very modem, air-conditioned, very wall maintained, and the easiest way to travel. It is very similar to taking the underground in London but instead of under it’s over, there are booths and machines for tickets, you then take the ticket to get through the turnstile, all very modern and convenient each journey takes only a few minutes and there’s a new train along every 8 minutes. My friend and myself (two girls) travelled at various times days and night and we experienced no trouble, we both thought it was great!

      For example, three of my favourite stops where;
      Pasai suni, this is where you can find central market (the cheapest place to find your tourist trinkets) and petaling street, this is in the area called little china, this is where you will find everything Chinese (tip. Here on Petaling Street, you always barter, half the fun of shopping here is bartering!)

      KLCC, is at the base of the twin towers, this is where you can find all fashions ranging from the high street to tiffany’s, (a LOT cheaper than anywhere in the west) also if you come early enough you can get a free ticket to go up to the viewing bridge which connects the two. Also the KL tower is just a short walk 15-20 min walk from here (or a 8ish ringitts taxi fare)

      Sentral train station is fantastic this is where all the different types of train connect, the monorail (which I did not travel on) the komuter which is slow, old and clean, don’t go on this if you want to go far. (It also drops you in places without signs or information about where you are) the LRT, which I think, is great and recommend everyone to try, if you’re going to Malaysia for a holiday. The KLI express that picks you up and drops you off right in the airport, 35 ringitts (£5) each way or if there are two of you travelling, 98 ringitts return! It’s so clean and comfy and only takes 28 minutes!


      I think that using the LRT is the only way to see Kuala Lumpur, it runs from the early early hours of the morning until 11.30 at night. It’s convenient and so so easy to use.

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        14.09.2001 07:06
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        I travelled from Kuala Lumpur to Singapore on the overnight sleeper train taking around 9 hours in total. The departure time for the sleeper is usually around 22:30 arriving at 07:30 the next morning. The cost of the train depends if you are in the lower or the upper berth. The lower one costs a few ringit more - 40 instead of 37.50. The train ( and bed ) turned out to be quite comfortable. There are 3 classes - 1st which are compartments that sleep 2 people, 2nd which is a carriage with permanent beds ( although during the day they are turned back into seats ) and 3 rd which is just seats. I was in 2nd class as I always find that there is a better chance of meeting fellow travellers and making new acquaintances. The train was certainly clean, as was the bed linen and the toilet was surprisingly not bad either. One drawback is the lack of any storage space, there is very little room for your belongings under the lower berth and none in between the beds. If you are on the upper berth, best bet is to move it all to the end of the bed. This has the obvious drawback of shortening an already not overly long bed. Anyone over 5’10” is going to feel the pinch. The train leaves from the brand new central station that is still being built around it. Although still covered in scaffolding and builders it looks an impressive sight. Albeit not quite as romantic and full of old world colonial charm as the old station. This new station is planned to be the central travel hub for KL connecting with the metro / skytrain and commuter trains. The Old station is still confusingly being used for some lines, although this is due to cease by the end of the year. A line is due to be opened in 2002 that connects with the international airport. The beds are already made up giving you an excellent excuse to try and get some sleep. The snag is, around 30 minutes into the journey the ticket inspectors will ask for your ticket
        . Even so, the gentle rocking of the train will soon have you asleep. Although most of the journey will be in darkness, the last section from Johore Bahru will be in early dawn light giving a first ( and I will be honest, dull ) glimpse of Singapore. As this is an international trip you have to stop at Johore Bahru on the Malaysian side then Woodlands on the Singapore side for customs and immigration. Unfortunately on the overnighter, this means waking up around 5am to hang around for 30-45 minutes to passports stamped etc. On the way back, the reverse procedure is applied. If you can, bring your own food. The price on board is high compared to outside. Once you get there the station is a few miles away from the centre of Singapore city, so a taxi is recommended unless you are travelling light and like walking or are just too short of money ! One quirky feature is that you only touch Singapore soil once you have left the station. The station itself is still owned by Malaysia. To sum up. If you have the time, this is definately a recommended way to travel. If not, fly and save the time. I am told though that the scenary you pass during the day is nice although not a must see.

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