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The first driverless tube service. Victoria is London's busiest station. The Victoria Line is a line of the London Underground, coloured light blue on the Tube map. It is a deep-level line running from the south-west to the north-east of London. Construction began in 1962 and continued until 1970. A test tunnel from Tottenham to Manor House under Seven Sisters Road had been constructed from 1959 onwards and this was later integrated into the running tunnels. Trains run every 2 - 2.5 minutes during the peak periods. In normal service, all trains run from Brixton to Seven Sisters, with approximately 2 out of 3 trains running to Walthamstow Central.

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      02.04.2010 21:22
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      Victoria Line

      The Victoria line is one of the lines on the London Underground, or the Tube as it's more commonly known.

      The London Victoria line runs from Brixton in the South to Walthamstaw Central in the North via Central London including Victoria station. 183 million passengers use the Victoria line each year making it the fourth busiest line on the network, with the average number of journeys per mile, it's the busiest line on the network. The tube line is light blue on the tube map and operates through zones 1, 2 & 3.

      In 2009, Transport for London, introduced brand new trains onto the line, which have nice clean new interiors, with comfortable padded blue seats, dark blue bright handrails and more space than the old ones, they have plenty of space for wheelchairs & pushchairs, luggage & plenty of standing room. They we're produced by a massive train carriage maker, Bombardier, the first new train entered passenger service on 21st July 2009 and one new train will enter service every two weeks from early 2010 until they completely re-new all trains sometime in 2012. I think the new trains are very nice, much brighter & cleaner than the old ones which first started on the line back 1967, they are obviously quite old & run down so a refreshing new train makes the journey a lot more pleasant.

      The Victoria line offers great connection opportunities, especially in Central London, with the Victoria Line linking with Circle, Hammersmith & City, Northern, Metropolitan, Bakerloo. Central, Picadilly, Jubilee, District at various stations so the Victoria Line is a great way to access all over London by changing trains mainly at Kings Cross, Victoria & Oxford Circus. Buses also link well at all stations, many buses run to/from Kings Cross to many North London destinations & Victoria to many South London destinations. At Victoria you can also walk around the corner from the station to catch coaches from London Victoria Coach station, with coaches leaving to & arriving from most destinations across the UK and also coaches to Europe. Victoria also has a mainline station where you can get connect to trains to/from the South including Gatwick Airport and from Kings Cross St Pancras to North East Coast line & also Eurostar trains to Paris & Brussels. So The Victoria line train has got a massive attraction as it connects most of London and beyond.

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      04.01.2009 10:12
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      One of the Better Tube Lines

      Is the Victoria Line driverless, whenever mine is delayed I have somebody explaining why. The Victoria Line is actually one of the more efficient of the London tube lines in my mind, if I want to get to Brixton from Victoria I can be there in 8 minutes, occasionally with the lines you'll get the sign there are no trains for 10 minutes, but unless theirs a problem lines are generally regular and efficient.

      The trains are old and especially around Victoria and Oxford Circus they can get really busy, but you can run one end to the other in around 45-50 minutes which is quite an achievement for a tube line when some of the longer lines require around 80-90 minutes to run them fully.

      My big quibble as with most lines is the inordinate amount of weekend closures for repair....ridiculous!!!

      The carriages are old and seating is fine if not a bit uncomfortable, the line is deeper than many others so can take a while to access from stations but overall the line is one of the best in London and used mainly between Central London, where it can be very crowded.

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      15.02.2001 16:53
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      The short description of the line - the first driverless service - would probably bring cries of derision from the train operators on the Victoria line, if they could read :). In fact, I know they might technically not be drivers, this is all computer controlled or something, but they're still there, so as far as passengers are concerned, it's the same as any other tube line. It's not like the DLR where you can sit at the front and look out the front window. I think the only difference is that trains always stop at the right place on the platform. You know how on other lines you're on the platform, gauging where the train's going to stop so you can stand by the door, then it does a final little spurt? Victoria Line trains never do that. The refurbishment that was done in the 80s means the trains are the same visually as the Bakerloo line, except they're done out in blue instead of brown. Much more aesthetically pleasing on a cold winter's morning. Astute studiers of the map will spot that the line connects to National Rail or other underground lines at every station except one, and this is because when the line was planned, it was meant to be a connecting line, joining up places that were otherwise a pain to get between. Rarely has London Underground been so forward thinking. Trains are extremely frequent, with gaps between trains at peak times usually meaning that as soon as one train has left the platform, the indicator (assuming it's working) will change to say next train approaching. It's almost worth living in a grotty area of London just so that you get to use the Victoria Line. Unless there's an operational problem, all trains southbound terminate at brixton and northbound at either Seven Sisters or Walthamstow (home of popular beat combo East 17 and a very large open air market). Because the line was built long after much of the rest of the underground, it has a num
      ber of short interchanges between lines, another example of forward thinking by LU which has rarely been seen since. In the following cases, the interchange is just through the passageway which would usually take you to the same line's opposit direction. But here, the opposite platform actually continues in the same direction on the different line. So, for example, from Victoria line northbound to Bakerloo northbound, walk across the platform at Oxford Circus. If you want to go from one line's northbound the other other's southbound, the walk's quite long. Other good places to change at Euston for the Northern Line city branch, and Stockwell for the Northern Line southern section. The line's also excellent for cutting journey times, especially when you would otherwise use the Picadilly Line. As every Picadilly Line commuter knows, the line has about a thousand stops and will take you at least 6 weeks to travel end to end. For example, say you want to get between Green Park and Finsbury Park... the Picadilly Line would be 10 stops, while Victoria Line is 6 and tends to travel faster anyway. Equaally, between Stockwell and Euston you can take either the Northern or Victoria lines, but the former has 11 stops, while the latter has 7. Beware, though, that Victoria Line northbound goes Euston first before King's X, while Northern Line nouthbound has King's X first. Don't ask why, it just does :). About the platform indicators which tell you how long till the next train... they lie almost as much as the ones for the buses. Don't believe them. Especially if it says 14 mins. If it said that on the Northern Line, it would be right, but not on the Victoria Line. Just know that in the years I've used the Victoria Line, I've never had to wait more than five mins, even when there was a strike on. It's gonna be with you soon, okay? Stop being impatient... go and buy yo
      urself a creme egg from the vending machine. Oh, and finally, in line with the rest of the London Underground, expect to wait at least 20 mins in the queue for a ticket at peak times. If you want a travelcard, you're better off buying from a newsagent nearby known as Pass Agents (nearby bus stops often have lists of local pass agents, but the tube staff probably won't know). Make sure you have the right change so you can use the ticket machine or have a card - the new-style machines accept credit cards for low value tickets, but you'll not be appreciated for using a card at the ticket office window. If you want a travelcard, you can buy it in advance, and it's often worth buying it the day before travel - go in the evening on your way home. You can buy them from any station, it doesn't have to be your local station, and you can even get them from National Rail stations if you want.

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