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Technics SL-1200MK2

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    7 Reviews
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      20.09.2012 14:07
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      Great deck for semi-pro DJs

      I've seen these decks in the clubs quite a lot and they looked like the biz and pretty simple to use. Most DJs use a laptop and 100s of MP3s which personally I think is cheating and takes the art away from DJing. Being a producer I do like my musical gadgets so I popped this one on my Christmas list a few years back and was glad to see that it was in my Christmas stocking one morning ☺ I love my hip hop and this seemed to be the right way to go for me

      The overall size of the deck is 45.3 cm x 36 cm x 16.2 cm and weighs just 11 kg. I now have this hooked up in my studio to my Denon amp and I love it to bits. The first thing that I noticed was that the motor was full-bodied, I guess it has to be for when the pro DJs are abusing it all the time. It reaches it's sfull speed of a track with in point seven seconds with is unbelieveable. The sound quality is impeccable and the design is ok but not too pretty, and quality is extremely robust and could no doubt cope with its fair share of knocks, although I don't take this out clubbing as I'm not a pro DJ. The upper part of the deck has a metal body which is nice and robust whilst the base is made of a superior rubber and 4 rubber feet which will take the knocks that a deck would be used to in the pro world of DJing.

      Beat matching i.e. running two tracks simultaneously is a dream can be done very accurately with the +/-8 fader. Other controls include analogue pitch reset, tone arm assembly, anti skating, motor, brake, and height adjust. Needless to say it comes with all the instructions that you need to get going. plus audio and power cables. All contacts are gold plated There's a greats feature that tells you how the motor is running which is on the on switch panel, when te=he white led spots are at zero it means that the pitch of the track you're playing is at zero, as the pitch increases then you'll see a number of red dots

      The arm height for me needed to be reduced in order to bring it inline with the surface of the record itself. And the rubber matt isn't ideal for me as it's too thick. I did manage to break the pitch slider but managed to replace it very cheaply for £15 myself. I believe that Techics don't make these decks anymore, so it's a case of hunting around for a good secondhand one.

      Purchased from Ebay for £199 plus delivery 5 years ago.

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      19.01.2012 19:45
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      If you're going to buy some turntables - get these.

      Decks, One's 'n' Two's, Wheels of Steel - whatever you call them, most people will agree that Technics are the standard turntables for DJing. Originally released in 1978 it's amazing to think that the 1200 MK2 model is (and has been for many years) still so popular. Why would this be? It's all down to the near perfect design. There are six key areas that made the 1200's stand out from other turntables of the time, these are:
      - A direct drive mechanism which used magnets instead of a rubber belt. This meant that there was no wear and no belt to replace.
      - A high torque on the platter. This means that it reaches the intended play speed almost immediately.
      - Low wow and flutter (which is the amount of frequency wobble caused by speed fluctuations) - this massively helps with beat matching because it means that the platter stays within 1/100 of 1% of the desired speed!
      - It weighs a ton! Well, 12.5kg to be exact and the platter is not collected to the base so any bumps or jogs don't tend to come through the speaker or make the needle jump.
      - They just keep on going! Because they are solid and well-built they can take a lot of heavy usage (I've had mine for 10 years now). Also, all the parts are repairable or replaceable.

      Unfortunately now these decks are no longer being produced. But there are many sets available as people reluctantly dust them off and sell them because they need the cash or the space is needed. Another good thing with these is that they are an investment. If you spend £500 chances are if you look after them you'll be able to get at least £500 back if you ever come to sell them. When times have been hard I have considered selling but I am so glad I didn't!
      Yes there are other deck vendors, but with Technics you know you are going to get everything you expect. If you can get a set - do it, you'll not only have the standard turntable for the last 30 or so years but you'll be buying something which is bound to go up in worth in the future!

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      06.10.2011 18:58
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      Often imitated, never equalled.

      These decks are now out of production, so if you're interested, my advice is to buy them now as their value is only going upwards. They may have been designed almost forty years ago, but that design is so good that it has stood the test of time. Essentially the innards are made from top quality components, as are all the external components, explaining why these are the default choice of turntable for virtually all DJ's. I've had my 1200's for ten years now and they haven't missed a beat. My only gripe would be the target light. When I first got my decks the target light would move into position with a smooth, damped motion, however after a couple of weeks they lost this action and come up with a bit of a clang. Other than this my 1200's have been perfect.
      I would advise anyone who is considering buying a set of these to do so now, as they are gathering value. However as they have gone out of production, any retailers that have any new stock left tend to be charging exorbitant prices. Many independent retailers are selling second hand ones and the small ads are full of them.If you are lucky enough to find a retailer with unopened stock at a price of £350 or less per turntable, my advice would be to snap them up.
      To everyone else considering buying a set, here's some advice to avoid you getting stung:

      1. At present it is a buyer's market, there is plenty of choice if you are patient and keep looking. Try to get the most pristine set you can and remember to haggle; most people will only part with their beloved Technics when they absolutely have to.

      2. Check that the gimbal (pivot) for the tonearm has no play in it, as it can be a pain to sort. Even if the gimbal does have play in it, it will most likely still track pretty well, but when it is in proper nick, you will be able to carry out insane scratching and it will never leave the groove.

      3. When checking the gimbal, check the tonearm itself. Look for any dents or dings, as they will affect the audio quality. A new tonearm is around £60 and about the same to have installed. If the tonearm is dented and the gimbal isn't tight, walk away.

      4. Ensure that the cartridge fits snuggly into the tonearm and has no play in it as this is an expensive fix. Likewise, avoid like the plague, any decks which have coins stuck on top of the cartridge. This absolutely destroys the needle, but more importantly will give you an insight into the sort of life the decks have had. (Some stylus/cartridge manufacturers make small weights designed for placing on top of the cartridge which resemble a 5 pence piece, but close inspection will usually distinguish these from actual coins).

      5. Check it is still calibrated. Start the turntable and move the pitch to zero (ensuring the green light comes on when you do). Now look at the strobe light (the light with the power switch on top) where it lights up the edge of the platter. The second row of dots should be completely motionless. If you are buying a pair, run them both simultaneously, and then move both pitches to their slowest and fastest positions and check they are synced. If they aren't they will need to be dismantled and re-calibated, a job best left to the experts, or one or both of the platters will need to be replaced, at around £60 a go.

      6. Move the pitch controller slowly away from zero in each direction. Check that the green light goes out as soon as it clicks out of the zero position. If it stays on with the pitch control moved even a tiny distance, the pitch control is knackered and needs replaced. I tend to find that 1200's with duff pitch controls have usually been ragged anyway.

      7. Place a record on the platter and put the needle in the first groove with music on it. Press down on the record on the opposite side from the needle, there should be virtually no vertical movement on either side of the platter. While still holding the record on the opposite side from the needle, start the deck. Now start to scratch it back and forward. If the needle is going to skip it is most likely to do it when stylus is at the far edge. It should be able to withstand some pretty vigorous scratching (don't go daft) and not leave the groove.

      8. Don't be put off by aftermarket phono leads. The original phone leads were a weakness and any aftermarket leads fitted will almost always be of superior quality. However as they are hardwired in, make sure they been installed properly. Do this by moving the leads around while you have the needle on a stationary record, and then listen for any crackling or "rustling."

      9. Check that the earth lead is correctly attached as these are very thin and flimsy, and easily pulled out when moving decks around. Some decks have been modified so that they don't need an earth, but to make sure this has been done right, listen for any low frequency humming, with the needle both on and off a stationary record.

      10. Unplug the deck and remove the slipmatt. On the platter are two holes through which you need to place the tops of your index fingers, with one thumb on the centre spindle. Now pull upwards to remove the platter. This will need to be be done with quite a bit of force so be ready for it to come free. Once you have the platter off, check the underside. You are wanting to check the iron core which runs around the platter. It is rare for these to be damaged, but it is brittle and if it gets chipped, it will affect the performance and precision of the deck, as it is this which the electro-magnets use to rotate and brake the platter.

      11. Lastly, don't get fobbed off by sellers trying to explain away any short comings from their turntables. Whilst 1200's which have components which are a bit loose and slack will still function pretty well with and stay in the groove most of the time, a tight, well maintained set will operate just as they did when they came out of the box, and that means the only time you will touch the needle is to place it at the start of a track and remove it afterwards. My 1200's are ten years old and it is a very, very rare occasion when the needle skips.

      Remember all Technics turntables are built like a Swiss watch, but like a Swiss watch, if treated with a bit of TLC, will last a lifetime, so when judging a potential purchase, set your standards high and don't worry if you don't use them a lot, because as I mentioned earlier they are no longer in production, so they are an asset which will only increase in value.

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      13.06.2010 20:24
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      Okay i already wrote a review on the technics 1210,nut that was my first review and consisted of about 3 words of useful information,so lets give it another bash.

      What is it.
      It is a turntable used for playing records on (remember those).It is primarily used in dj set-ups as part of a pair of turntables with a mixer.It is pretty much the best turntable ever made, it even has a place in the national science museum.So what makes it so great , to start off with it is what is called a direct drive turntable,this means that the platter upon which the record sits is drove by a motor,this gives excellent reliability and hold of the track.Basically once you set it to a speed it is going to stay at that speed, this is great for djing as the last thing you want is a shoddy motor deciding to play the record at whatever speed it fancies.

      For that reason alone they are now the industry slandered in any nightclub.The motor holds the platter perfectly where as with other manufacturers the motor is not quite as tight, i no that means nothing to Joe public but it is a must, it is what essentially makes the mix.

      Another great thing is that it is unaffected by vibrations,due to having a die-cast aluminium body and rubber base the turntable simple adsorbs the vibrations which is also great,when a heavy bass-line kicks in and shakes the needle and sends it skipping across the record in-front of 1500 people (yes speaking from experience) you will be thankful for this robust build.

      The overall feel is very sturdy and no corners are cut in the production,the platter is completely sturdy,the pitch control is smooth and easy to use and lock,The arm is also very sturdy and does not feel like it is about to fall off,as is the case with cheaper alternatives.

      I have had a pair of these for longer than i can remember and aside from the light bulb blowing have never had any trouble, and this includes me taking them out and about in clubs etc,they have been on for about 7hrs in 1 night and there was no lag or anything they were perfect the whole night.

      Specs
      Colors available SL-1200MK2: Silver
      SL-1200MK2PK: Black

      Type Quartz direct-drive (manual turntables)

      Drive Method Direct-Drive

      Motor Brushless DC motor

      Turntable Platter Aluminum diecast

      Diameter 13 5/64" (33.2cm)

      Mass 3.74 lbs (1.7 kg)

      Turntable Speeds 33-1/3 rpm, 45 rpm

      Variable Range Pitch ±8%, ±16%

      So what about the price well they range from £300 for a pair of second hand ones or £450 for a single brand new one.Or if you are feeling really flush get the gold ones they come in at about £700 for one last time i checked.But you really get what you pay for with them.They are quite easy to find on any musician website.There are lots on e bay and my mate picked up a reconditioned pair for £300, he has had em 3yrs with no problems so far.They will take a bit of getting used to if you have used other turntables before these well it did for me.The main reason i decided to purchase them was because everywhere i played out they had them, so i decided to purchase them to get used to them, now every-time i play out it is like mixing at home.

      I have seen lots of accessories as-well , you can change the obvious things like slip-matt, cartridge etc..It looks great as well and has been the favourite choice of turntables among the worlds top DJs for the last 25 years so you can not really go wrong.

      Negatives i guess the price is a tad hefty but it is most defiantly justified.Ermmmm that is about all i can say really for the negatives, there literally is nothing wrong with this product.

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        26.04.2001 22:21
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        Back when I was about 14 years old, I wanted desperately to have two decks and a mixer. I couldn't afford them and quickly found out that stripping the wires down on the cables of two record players and taping them together didn't work! Now that I am a grown up and have managed to earn a few quid I decided last year to make my chilhood dreams come true. Whilst I did reseacrh other decks, I plumped for the Technics SL1200 MKII. To be honest I went for the 1200s over the 1210 purely because I thought that the only difference was the colour and I like the silver ones! I believe that there is a technical difference between the two but not one noticeable to most users. I am V V V pleased with my decision. Even though I am novice in terms of my skills, I can see why pros have chosen these decks for so many years. If you are starting out I would urge you to save up enough cash to buy SL1200s, here's why. You will be clumsy with you fingers when you start. You'll press the records much harder than you need to when cueing, you'll be heavy handed speeding up or slowing the turntable, you'll probably knock and budge the decks when you panic realising that your live mix sounds like a horse winning the Grand National! BUT buy a decent deck like the SL1200 and it will take the punishment. Why? Well basically the construction. The Deck plate is heavy aluminium which is driven by a very powerful high torque motor. This means that it will not lose the fight with your fingers and slip mat when cueing up a record. It gets up to speed in well under a second meaning you will be able to plant that killer bass thump bang on time into your mix. the base of the unit is also very heavy (dont try and lift both of them at once when you pick them up form the shop)which means it wont transfer a knock to the plate and subsequently the needle if you bang your hand against it in a moment of madness. I have not ha
        d any detectable pitch slip with either of my decks in over a year. freinds have bought similarly priced alternatives and have had to compensate during the mix for this kind of problem. When you are starting out you do not want this problem making the whole business even more confusing. The deck passes a lovely pure signal from the cartridge needle combo to your mixer. You will, by buying the decks, automatically become an unofficial member of the "I own an SL1200" club with the internet being a tremendous resource of enthusiasts ready to share tips on getting the best from your deck. if you are buying for the first time, and are a newbie user, do what I didn't. Ask the shop to talk you through correctly balancing the tone arm and fitting the cartridge. It is a straight forward procedure but get it slightly wrong and you will percieve problems with your deck like needles skipping on an intro bass beat, that are not a fault of the deck at all. Downsides? None really at all. I guess I'd like to see a pitch control that doesn't have a zero % click thing, i.e. a smooth -8 to +8 travel, I think they may even have one now! Anyway, I love mine, sometimes I just clean them and look at them to say thank you for the hours of punping pleasure they give me. Sad but true.

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          15.04.2001 21:12
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          Many companies are bringing out all singing, all dancing decks that claim to be better than the industry standard-the Technics SL1210 or SL1200-but none, in my opinion, come close. These are the best selling decks there are, so surely that shows how good they are. With +/-8% pitch, and very quick start up times, no wonder nearly all top DJs choose Technics as their weapon. The Technics decks have been around for years, but still look ready for business. Although there is no difference performance wise, I prefer the Technics 1200s to the 1210s. With their sexy silver finish and retro look, these decks would look at home anywhere, not just in the big clubs. Most of the cheaper decks copy the same layout as the 1200s and 1210s, which has now become the industry standard layout, though they cannot match their performance. The build quality is second to none, and workmanship is excellent. The only small problem with them is that the pitch fader clicks into place at 0% pitch, which can make mixing around the 0% pitch mark a slight problem, though this has been altered on the soon to be released MK3's. With that as the only small problem, along with the rather hefty price tag(though they are well worth it), you can see why so many people swear by Technics. For anyone on a tight budget, try picking up a pair second hand as they are widely available and much cheaper. Anyone considering becoming a DJ should always look for a pair of 1200's first.

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            09.03.2001 23:51
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            The Technics SL 1200 turntable! it is art, it function, it is science, it is history, it is poetry, it is a classic. The timeless deck boasts faultless direct drive and pitch pefect quartz timing, Many years ago (possibly 8) I borrowed and begged to buy my first turntables, wanting something to spin my burgeoning collection of waxtastic dance tunes on(it looked so easy), I was determined to realise my dream of blending repetitive beats into a seamless, flowing soundscape. Unfortunately my pocketmoney dropped short of the majestic Technics, I settled for the woodenbox Ariston, beltdriven turntable. This was not cool! For those of you who are unaware of the difference between Direct and Belt drive I will attempt to explain.(If I get this wrong feel free to correct me) Direct drive turntables involve a complex motor with a magnetic field for high torque. A belt drive turntable involves the coupling of the motor to the platter with the help of a limp rubber belt. The main problem with the belt drive is that it does not start and stop quickly when the record and platter are held manually, while direct drive motors regain their speed very quickly. This comes in very handy when cueing up a record at the same speed as another and releasing it into a mix. Also over time the rubber belt may stretch making fine pitch adjustments tricky as the turntables revolution speed fluctuates. Anyway getting back to the point, I had purchased an inferior turntable, and though not upset, I was not completly satisfied. However looking back when learning to mix you need to be able to "fiddle" with the deck to get the required speed out of it when mixing a record, for this purpose the belt drive was perfect. The technics turntable has a lot of torque, thus when you push it, it pushes back. For example, if you have "dropped" a track into the mix with another and it is slightly out of time, you need to ad
            just it slightly to compensate. With a belt drive turntable it will let you do this almost while holding onto the pin and twisting. With DD it always pushes back to it's normal pitch unless you adjust the pitch control. However once you have mastered the art of beatmatching, the beltdrive becomes obsolete. The features that made it useful for learning suddenly become a hinderence. You are ready to graduate to the real deal, the mean machine, the mackdaddy the Technics SL series. Unfortunatly, by this time I was a University student, with just enough money to destroy any will to learn or get out of bed before 4.00pm. Now one afternoon I got lost on my way to a lecture, took a wrong turn and found myself looking at a newsagent advert, with picture of two Technics SL1200 turntables with mixer included....£500.00. That very moment a friend walked by, now it turns out he had just come into alot of money, how? I asked, Student loan. He said. This was fate the wheels were mine, the rest is history.... There is often argument over the choice between the SL1200 and the SL1210. The only functional difference is that when you hit the start button on a SL1210 it stops immediately, while the SL1200 is a fraction slower. In practice this makes little or no difference in the mixing world. What does make a difference is that the SL1200's are black, a rather cheap and ordinary black if you ask me. The SL 1200's shine like two silver jet engines powering the mix. This classic styling gives them the edge over the SL1210's everytime. The desks are solid, heavy, smoothly crafted, they are a label and a design not to be messed with. Now we have many new direct drive turntables on the market, boasting "performance as good as Technics". I have tried some of these pretenders, they felt tacky and wrong. Sure they worked well enough and got the job done, but the feeling that you get from the technics was
            not there, no fun. The difference in feel and touch is the difference between a Mazda and a Ferrari, the latter oozes passion. The technics design is unchanged in almost 20 years. It still rocks the discoteque...

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          • Product Details

            The Technics SL1200 Mk2 is the established DJ turntable, with solid build, high torque motor and stable tone arm.