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      18.09.2014 21:15
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      A great place to study and to party!

      Brunel University is in Uxbridge, Middlesex West London right at the end of the picadilly tube line. For me the appeal was that it is still fairly rural but accessible to London. It actually takes just over an hour to get into Central London from the university. Uxbridge town itself is a little run down but there are plenty of little shops, cafés and bars that are willing to take on part time students. I got a part time job working in a bakery so brilliant as food and wages!



      Whilst I was at Brunel university there was loads of building work going on. An extension was being put on the library which was really annoying making quite studying in the library impossible, yet, you would still get fined using your mobile phone in there!



      There are fantastic sports facilities at Brunel university despite the university traditionally being engineering based. The university is really nice how it is all mostly on one site. There are a few bars and shops on site which compared to other universities I have visited is really good.



      Straying in halls in the first year is as must as it is such a big part of university life. I stayed in Mill Hill which was one of the better halls. It didn't feel very homely but you get lots of benefits staying in halls including having your room cleaned for you once a week! Brilliant!



      I loved my time at Brunel University! The university does seem to be improving with high quality teaching,

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        09.07.2014 11:52
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        Wonderful staff, slowly climbing up the leagues but is sat in quiet Uxbridge

        Brunel is a wonderful university to be in. For one, throughout the years that I''ve been here there have been constant upgrades on campus, amongst the staff and also in the leagues table. I undertook an engineering course in Brunel. Lecturers that are brought in to educate students are mainly very engaging and helpful towards students. You will also be assigned to a tutor, whom you can go to if you face any problems/obstacles during your studies. This range from homework/tutorial problems to more serious problems involving your career within the university. Tutors are assigned to you at random, thus how helpful your tutor can be will depend on luck. One thing I will say, the school takes complaints very seriously so if you ever feel underprivileged by an arrangement, always raise it with the administration. As an engineering student you will be subject to a handful of lab work. The lab work that you will actually touch is pretty basic. That being said, lecturers are less willing to let students run rampant on their equipments on the expense of us having difficulty in grasping the physical concept of certain experiments/theories. Nonetheless it has a very supportive Careers and Placement office who will guide you towards securing or developing a successful career. They will run career fairs, in which big companies and prospective employers are brought in to speak to students, and for students to speak to them (impress them for the job!). Societies and clubs are also plentiful and at times receive funding to sponsor students on conferences/exhibition tours outside of town/the country. Last word : Brunel is a great university, albeit shadowed by its location (Uxbridge is rather quite and dull)

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        04.11.2010 20:39
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        Despite my excellent years there, its not a place I'd recommend

        Brunel University is a paradox, with contradicting elements. Overall, I enjoyed my three years there immensely, ultimately leaving with a 2:1 in English with Creative Writing. Like most University's, the area in which it is situated is pretty rundown, with Uxbridge being quite a depressing place to live. It also seems to swell during the week before becoming almost a ghost-town during the weekend - this is particularly evident on campus so students who are intending to stay better be adept at keeping themselves amused!

        My first year at Brunel was dull, as I was disappointed by the campus' one pathetic nightclub and the course seemed uninspiring and disorganised. However, for the second year, I left my decrepid halls and moved into a decaying house five minutes from university. However, we began to stray further afield for our nights out, and I was lucky enough to get a job at one of the two small student bars. As we began to party in London, my degree suffered. We had some epic times, exploring a variety of clubs and drunkenly meandering round the streets of central London, but I began missing some of the 9 hours of lectures I had a week, and my priorities began to shift.

        Ultimately, my mindset was to focus on enjoying myself rather than my course, and I was lucky and perhaps undeserving to scrape a 2:1. As a university I would certainly not recommend it, especially if you are considering taking a subject that is outside of it's specialist subjects: engineering and sports science. However, that said I was clammering to go back while I was considering to become a teacher, and I had eventually an excellent time. The ever improving buildings are impressive, and the less glamorous accomodation is slowly being replaced by new, plush if not faceless buildings.

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        14.08.2010 10:22

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        I had a question.Is Isambard a good place to live in?

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        09.09.2008 22:21

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        I love Brunel

        I spent 4 great years at Brunel studying for a BSc. Firstly i got assigned great halls for my first year- Fleming. You`ll want to avoid Isambard, and Chepstow- however they are the cheapest options so you get what you pay for. My room was a good size, with broadband internet and en-suite. There are about 8 rooms in a hallway and a big kitchen to share. The campus is massive- the sports facilities are brilliant, plenty of astro turf pitches, indoor and outdoor athletics track, basketball and netball pitches, and an indoor rock climbing wall. On campus there is a club, a few bars, mini market, restaurant etc. The libray has a coffee shop, and has recently had an extension- the facilities are modern and upto date with plenty of access to computers and then internet. You can easily get to the campus by bus, and it is a 15 minute walk from Uxbridge town centre. I loved my time at Brunel and would recommend it.

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        25.09.2006 15:41
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        Great for engineering based subjects

        I recently graduated from Brunel with a degree in Systems Engineering. Overall, I enjoyed my time there.

        The atmosphere on camus overall was good. I always felt safe there, even at night. There is a nightclub that puts on good club nights, even if the bouncers can be a bit rude. The SU bar is nice, and has been refurbished from the dark cave it once was into something resembling an internet cafe without the internet.

        The sports centre is nice, with a good gym that has very cheap membership. The showers aren't that great, but it's your not paying for a fancy health club either.

        The library is a good place to study, and I managed to find all the books and journals I needed all the way through university. By the end of the 1st year, I'd learnt that I didn't need to spend a fortune buying every text book - the library had them all.

        Some drawbacks:

        Parking
        Can be a problem. As long as you get there before 10am or after 3pm, your generally OK. Arrive at midday and forget it. Oh, and they put nasty stickers all over your windows if you park outside a marked bay, even if there is nowhere else to park.

        Computers
        There are generally not enough computers to go around. There is no waiting list/booking system either. your allocated storage space is generally not enough, and there are no CDRWs.

        Lecturers
        The good ones are very good, and the bad ones are very bad. There is no real feedback system in place for the lecturers, so the powers that be tend to ignore problems until everyone fails an exam.

        Personal Tutors
        I had two of these. The first on left without telling me. The second one was particularly unhelpful. It is a hassle to try and change your personal tutor, and not worth it for me.

        Work Placements
        You need to find your own, really. The industrial placements office is a bit useless. My first placement I was sent to a horrible company, which had serious management issues and a pretty bad health and safety policy. The second placement I found myself.

        Apart from these problems, Brunel is a great university, especially for Engineering. I got to work with cutting edge technology for my final year project, and got a lot of support on that.

        I was able to tailor my course to my strengths and weaknesses by picking from a huge selection of modules - no other university allowed this at the time I started the course.

        I was also able to take extra language lessons for free, and there are a large number of clubs and activities you can choose to participate in.

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          26.04.2001 14:03
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          Although this university is more known for their courses that give you a BSc, I’m studying for a BA degree in History and the course isn’t too bad. I’m in my second year. Perhaps I’m not the right kind of person to ask if you want to know about Brunel University, since I live in Oxford and travel for my lectures. I don’t even hang around that much. But I’ve noticed a few things that I reckon are worth mentioning. After I was accepted to study here, I had to attend a few ‘important’ (or so they said) events, which were spaced out over 5 days. I didn’t have a room at the university, so this was highly inconvenient. Registration was straightforward, for almost every other student. Being a late applicant, there were a few problems with registration. Thus, I ended up being sent back and forth between so many different departments before I could officially be a student of the university. My advice is that if it’s possible to avoid being a late applicant, do so by all means! Another good reason for applying early is the limited accommodation on campus. Soon after starting my course, the lecturer questioned a few in my class about accommodation. It was astounding to see how many students had to travel over great distances to get to the place. Still, a list of people in the area offering student accommodation is offered on request. It was quite fun going through it, seeing some interesting things as well as (in some cases) some exorbitant costs for potential unlucky students that might make unwise decisions. Thankfully, I live at home. I’ve got 2 PCs right here and can chill out how I like. Plus, the cost of travelling for me is far less than the cost of getting a room there. For anyone that can handle travelling, I’d take this into account before getting a room, as well as a certain other opinion on Dooyoo about student accommodation (it was an interesting read, laus). Structu
          re differs from other universities in the sense that there are ‘semesters’ instead of ‘terms’. This effectively splits each university year into 2. I view this as a simple approach, relieving things from complication. Plus, the holidays tend to be long. Summer breaks are particularly good, covering June, July, August and some of September. The courses are modular, which in my opinion, is better than a bunch of exams at the end of the whole course. For each semester, you must pick a certain amount of modules. Lectures for my course are about 3 hours long each. This semester, my 3 modules are on different days of the week. You’ll have to do more modules in the third year, obviously. If you have to do a lot of travelling to get to the university, when choosing your modules, the times for when they’re set are almost as important as the course content! In the Faculty of Arts, it’s compulsory to do a module each year that’s outside your course, so for example, I chose a module from the American Studies department. Some may find this quite a fun thing yet others might see it as a waste of time. In some cases, it’s possible to combine 2 degrees for joint honours. So, a guy I knew from high school is doing History with American Studies and this is half the course content of each discipline. You can also throw a bias towards one subject if you desire, adopting a major/minor approach. Lecturers are fairly easy to get in contact with if you need any help on particular things to do with your course, in the sense that they have their own e-mail addresses. If you need to contact them in person, the times for when they’re available are displayed on their doors and you’ll see that they’re only available for discussion and help on certain days of the week. Reception is quite helpful, willing to help you out if you don’t know where an exam is or where a certain room is. Plus, I’ve noticed that
          generally there’s a lot of parking space too. You have 24-hour access to the university computer rooms (provided you have your student card with you). The Internet is free and the speed at which you’re connected is adequate. There are even facilities to print and scan, but they’re often in use. You’ll need a little patience here. At some points in the day, the computer rooms are almost empty. At others you won’t find a spare computer and might have to wait alongside a bunch of similarly annoyed students. I’m so glad I’ve got 2 PCs at home. The university website is very helpful at times, especially when finding out things for particular modules you’re studying or for modules you’re thinking of studying next year. However, don’t rely on them for everything. I used the website to find out the essay questions and deadline for a certain module I had. I completed the essay, yet took it in to find out that the deadline displayed on the website was wrong. It said 10 April, but was in fact 29 March. The lecturer failed to update the website, so I was looking at last year’s information! There are a few places to get something to eat on campus and even a little newsagent type of store for those all important ‘junk food’ snacks and top-up cards. Plus, there’s a Waterstones shop for buying some books, but the range isn’t as good as what you might find in Uxbridge’s city centre. I’ve only had to buy 1 book for my course, but only because that was ‘compulsory purchase’ (yeah, a compulsory waste of time and money). There’s a library in the city centre, but personally I reckon the university library has generally enough to cater for my course, even some periodicals and articles. There are a few deficiencies though. Some topics aren’t covered well (such as particular areas in the medieval section) and predictably enough, you’ll find t
          hat closer to the deadline, many of the important books would’ve disappeared. Still, I’ve not found that to be much of a problem. Hey, I’ve received ‘A’ grades for coursework, despite being the worst procrastinator I know. As for the kind of people here, I haven’t bothered talking to anyone or trying to make friends, so I wouldn’t know. It’s evident that some people love the place and many seem quite happy in their own groups of friends. It’s also apparent that there are a lot of clubs here to join. Plus, there’s the opportunity to do a few extra things, like learn a new language and take a few GCSEs if you even want to, though I’ve not properly enquired. Outside the university, there’s not much of a social atmosphere, despite it being close to London. Then again, you can always get the U3 bus from university to take you to Heathrow Central Bus Station (takes about 20-40 minutes) then catch an underground train to the centre of London, if you wish to do so. One word of warning! The bus service is terrible at times, with some waiting times exceeding 1 hour and even waiting times for passengers riding. It used to be better. I hope they improve it. This isn’t such a bad place to have my lectures. The rooms are fairly clean, with usually a bin in each. In some cases, there are far too many students doing a particular module, forcing room changes. The lecture theatres aren’t so bad. They’re kitted out with the usual requirements, such as adequate spacing, good lighting and OHP screen. As for any important mail or things that you need to know, you have a pigeonhole for things though don’t expect to get everything. You never know when someone student might think it’s funny to do a little immature extraction. For students that live at home, things like important notices, deadlines and overdue library book information will be sent to your house (that’
          s nice of them). This is a fairly good place to have my lectures and do things for my course. It gives me a lot of freedom too, because the way you work isn’t checked. Organisation is largely up to you, which is a definite good point. I haven’t many problems with doing my course at Brunel University, so I’m ultimately content with things. May unchecked procrastination live on!

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            01.03.2001 01:54
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            Advantages: Build social skills.Gain qualifications Disadvantages: Social divide.Mainly for the middleclass Brunel university, world renowned for it's high calibre students.Who all pass with honours.The reality of the university is that everyone I have ever met from Brunel, turns out to be a geek or a nerd. What's the big deal about going to uni anyhow.I intend to be extremely rich & successful & although I will probably be studying non-stop for three next ten years or so of my boring life. Attending a public socially controlled institution full-time for three years does not come into my plans. Nowadays, with homestudy, excelerated learning programs at the workplace; not to mention the open university. Anyway, that's just my personal opinion. I do not see why people should study for three years preparing for the world of work, when you can get practical, hands-on experience in your chosen field.With the added benefit of gaining a professional qualification.

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              23.02.2001 03:55
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              How can you not love Brunel? I am currently doing a joint honours degree in Film/tv and drama, I have been at Brunel for one and a half years and I am so glad that I came here! Okay, so we are totally surrounded by concrete but at summertime it doesn't seem to matter because the greenery that is there is lush and on sunny days you will find everyone just sitting around campus having a good time. I have totally taken advantage of having a club and bars on campus and would highly recommend Wednesday nights (aka 'Decades') which is a highly entertaining night dominated by cheesy/chart music with a splash of garage thrown in which means you don't stop your feet moving till the wee small hours! Accomodation has been found to be a nightmare (though this is due to the fact that many departments have been moved from the Twickenham campus to the Uxbridge campus). However my experience of flats was great, and I now share a house with three of the people whom I origanally was thrown together with. The only unpleasant part was waiting for security to turn up at three in the morning when the fire alarms went off (which happened frequently!). Although I love Brunel, I have to admit that the administartors are not particularly helpful, particularly those who deal with performing arts whom seem to think that the best way to help us is to be generally quite rude and patronizing. I do think my course is very good, the drama programme in particular has been rated very highly as it looks specifically at (20th modes of practice. My film/tv course also has inspired me to think about travelling to Hong Kong and as I dislike travelling to far off places this is some feat! There is reasonable access to London but it takes quite a will of effort to make the journey as it's about an hour's travelling on the tube to get there and about an hours waiting for the night bus to get back - but heh, the inbetween is usu
              ally worth it! In general, I think that Brunel is an excellent place to study, but don't be put off by first impressions. The place really does grow on you!

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                11.01.2001 19:35
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                I’ve only been at Brunel about four months, but I think I’ve come to some definite conclusions about the place since I started. I’m doing a degree in Multimedia, Technology and Design; although more and more universities are starting internet and web based courses, You might find the choice rather limiting. This course was a nice all-round package and very up-to-date, which is why I chose it. But I am pretty appalled by the lack of computer resources at this university, which affects me more than most due to the nature of my course. Luckily now I have my own computer and free internet access in my room, but there was a time when I was rushing round the campus desperately seeking out a computer to use so I could meet a deadline in for that afternoon, and having little success. Brunel has its own computer centre, but during the day this is packed out, and they don’t designate any computer rooms for people who need to spend a lot of time on them for their course so you’re competing for a computer against people who are just there to mess around on the internet and send social emails. I found this very irritating when I had to get some work done and computers were being taken up by people that didn’t REALLY need them. You can usually get a computer late at night but then this doesn’t help much if you need a computer right then and there. Once when I had a pressing deadline I was shocked to find that one or two of the rooms in the computer centre, which are supposed to be available for everyone at all times were closed because some class was taking place there as rooms had been doubled booked. Double booked rooms seemed to be quite a common occurance at the start of the term. My advice to anyone coming to Brunel who’s course involves a lot of computer work is reconsider coming here unless you can afford a computer of your own that will suit your needs. I was also disappointed by the lack of scanners
                and colour printing facilities, both of which I need for my course. I have seen some scanners scattered around the place, but certainly not a great number, and as for colour printers? You might as well forget it. Both these things are vital to my course so decided to go out and buy them despite the expense. You generally get left to do whatever you please at Brunel and they never check up on you or find out how you’re getting on. You have a personal tutor that you see once a year to discuss your overall annual progress but that’s about it. This is a good thing in some respects, if you like your freedom and can cope well on your own for instance. But if you ever need to find out where you should go or what to do about any problems you might have, there is little support offered to you. I recall on my first week, aspects of my timetable conflicted so I was trying to find someone who could help me find out what room I should be in at what time for a meeting with my tutor, lectures and such. Everywhere I went for help no one seemed able to advise me and kept sending me somewhere else, so after over an hour of waiting in queues and traipsing across campus from one place to another, I gave up. After a few days I got the answers I was looking for, by which time it was already too late for a lot of the meetings and activities. When I first looked into coming to Brunel I was excited by the ‘free foreign language tuition’ and all the clubs, which are offered to you; many for only a minimal fee. However, aside from ‘Fresher’s Fare’ which goes on for a day where you can sign up for an impressive array of clubs including rock climbing, scuba diving, self-defence and tons of other activities, there’s no where you can go to enquire about these things. I have no clue where to go to sign up for the free foreign language course for example, and I’ve been here nearly four months! I’m sure there are places
                you can go to, but if there are they haven’t been well advertised at all, and there’s no one you can really ask. Now I partly feel unable to join these things as I have no idea what clubs are taking place where and when. The social life’s not too bad. There’s a club in Uxbridge and quite a few bars, but no more than what you’d expect for a small town. Just don’t expect an extremely buzzing nightlife in town just because Uxbridge is technically part of London. You’ll be disappointed. Though the university itself has about three bars and it’s own little club where the student union frequently organize events, which are often a lot of fun. If you get bored with Uxbridge life you can always jump on the tube into the centre of London. But be warned, it costs on average around £30 to get back to Uxbridge from the centre of London by taxi once the tubes stops. There is a night bus but it’s very irregular so I wouldn’t recommend taking it. Overall the university is quite a good place to study. I’m quite happy with my course, though I can’t say I’ve fallen in love with the campus itself, but in all fairness I know a lot of people that have. Perhaps my view of the university as a whole has been tarnished by my experience in halls (see accomodation section) Because of this, I would recommend avoiding halls at all costs.

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                  07.07.2000 18:10
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                  I finished my HND in Computing at Brunel last summer. I found it to be a great place, loads of great people, even the lecturers are friendly (most of them). It has a relaxing, very acedemic atmosphere that makes you want to do your work, and learn more. The facilities are above average, and the lecturers know their stuff. I strongly recommend this university to anyone - especially the HND Computing coures - I enjoyed it endlessly, and the 2 years flew by so quickly it seemed like I had been there a month.

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