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      24.05.2012 12:09
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      I have loved my time at this uni and would recommend the place to anyone.

      Sheffield Hallam Uni has more than 20,000 students, some young school or college leavers, some 'mature' students. Walk into any university building here and you can see that students are happy with their facilities and education.

      The university has two main campuses: city campus which sits on the edge of the city centre besides the train station, and collegiate campus which is still only 5/10 minutes from the city centre, in a lively area full of student houses. Buildings wise, city campus is much more modern than collegiate, which is full of old, charming brick buildings. Both campuses are very easy to get around, and there are plenty of maps around each in case you cant find a particular building.

      Hallam uni has some excellent facilities, including the Adsetts centre, the university's main library. This library contains everything you could need or want for any course and more, featuring a large selection of books on every subject imaginable, a number of journals and written papers, a DVD collection and a large number of computer facilities for use on every floor. Different computer floors include quiet study, silent study and quick access, so you can find the learning environment to suit you. These computers get very busy around exam time and work deadlines in January and May, and at these times an increase in computers would be useful, as its often very hard to find one not in use. (Unless you get there before 9am when most other students are still in bed!). There is a second library at Collegiate campus, which is much smaller than the city campus library but this is mainly because fewer courses study on this campus, mainly medical and sports courses.

      All first years are guaranteed accommodation, and from the halls of residence that I have lived in and have spent time in with friends, I can say that 80% of the accommodation offered is more or less perfect for a students needs. Many are ensuite, with all bills included, and all are excellently located for the uni.

      I read some of the other reviews of Sheffield Hallam on this site and found that some had very few good things to say, but as a current student at the university I disagreed with many of their negative points. I find that the university is a great environment with everything you could need for your studies, and the people (both staff and teachers) are nothing but friendly. I would recommend this university to anyone wanting to study in the area.

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      30.06.2010 18:21
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      sheffield...the best place up north!

      This was my insurance option for my university choices (my second choice) and I got the chance to see the university and what it was like while I was attending my audition instead of going to an open day. These usually start in mid/late June and run into the beginning/mid October. I was auditioning for the drama course of film and theatre course - this course appealed to me very much and it was something I wanted to do badly. (fingers crossed for a place!)
      My audition was suppose to be on 11th March, but then I had to move it due to travel problems, so it was then moved to 30th March.
      And yes, some courses at the uni do require you to attend an audition or interview!
      When I got to the university it was very modern, very close to the city centre, which is great for shopping, job vaccines, sight-seeing and exhibitions and museums, very lively and welcoming. However, it was a little quiet when I went cause most of the students were on their holidays (during Easter period)
      When I arrived at the university it was very clean, very tidy the lecturers and staff were very welcoming.
      I liked the fact that the university was very modern, up-beat, it's also a good area for young people and a lot of young people go to the university.
      The building is pretty huge, so if you go for the first time it's very easy to get lost in! But the staff are always helping you find your way round! And there's members of staff in every part of the building!
      The space of the university is very good, as it is a popular university! More space to due to open, due to the amount of space you can tell that the university has put a lot of money towards making Sheffield Hallam a good university and the invested the money well and it was money well spent too!
      The accomodation is quite close to the buildings (about five to ten minute walks) so you don't have to worry about catching buses or running late.
      The nightlife/student union is good - they always have something for everyone there's always lots going on (check out the fresher's week - it's a great way for new students to meet new people, make new friends!)
      I know serveral people who went to the university and they really enjoyed it, my auntie went there a few years ago and she thought that the university was very good and the education was at an excellent standard and she thought that the teaching was good. Yes, the staff are very nice, very polite and very welcoming!
      Overall, I was very pleased with the university and it was up to all my expectations and I was offered a place at the university to do acting stage and screen, and I'm so pleased I chose this university as my back-up.
      So if you are thinking about going to university, have a look at this one - but make sure you're number one reason is the course not party life style, or where your friends are going! But defo worth looking at if you like being in an atompshere with young people (18-21 year olds!)

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      22.06.2009 13:03
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      A very nice university which i have really enjoyed

      I joined Sheffield Hallam at the start of the September 2008 to study a Business Information Systems degree which is a four year sandwich course, i joined the university based on what i've heard from my friends which have previoulsy been there, its not too far from where i live already on the train, great nightlife, great music venues and its also a very big vibrant city with two great football teams.

      ***University building***
      The university buildings are all together in an area which is very good for accessing them, there some other university buildings a bit further away on the collegiate campus but i think those are mainly for sports subjects and you get accomodation very close to them if your choosing to study a sports course.
      The main university building i very nice and modern, it has a book shop right at the side of it, for getting all your books at the start of the year, you can even take your books back and exchange them for credit on your card for next time your going to be purchasing books, i think you get about a 1/3 of the price of the book based on condition etc.
      Inside the main university building there are many different support desks and receptions to help you with any problems, theres a finance support office, course support offices and main receptions etc. The building also offers many standing computers, which are very good if you need to check something quickly like your timetable etc.
      There are about 9 levels to this building and there are quite a few lifts which can help you get to the top if you don't want to walk it, the building has many computer rooms and a main lecture theatre called the penine lecture theatre, there also many smaller lecture theates in this building as well as cafes, vending machines, a shop and cash machines. The building also gives you access to the libary which you can also access from other directions as well, the library is very big with a few floors, there are loads of different facilities it offers as well as providing the students with many many books and a place to study with computers, you can laminate and bind your work there etc.

      ***Accomodation***
      My accomodation at Sheffield Hallam was a university owned accomodation part of the Unite propertys called Archways, it costed around £84 a week with ensuite, i chose to pay my accomodation in 3 lump sums, i think you could also pay in 6 if you wanted. The accomodation building can hold about 400 students and each room had been 3-6 people, the great thing about this accomodation was it is about 2 minutes from the university, it was a very secure accomodation with on site security and on site receptionists available during the day, i had no problems with any trouble. There is alot of security cameras etc on site so it was very secure, you also get a key fob which allows you to enter the accomodation. There was an occasional bit of noise at night but it was usually very quiet after about midnight when all the students had left for there nights out. The rooms in the accomodation were quite big, with an ensuite bathroom with shower, a wardbrobe built into the wall, a mirror, shelves and desk and of course a bed. It was a very clean accomodation on arrival and looked very new.
      The lounge area of the accomodation was very nice too, it came with a fridge/freezer, microwave, all the other kitchen essentials, a TV, sofas, stools and a nice table to eat around, you were also supplied with a cupboard full of cleaning essentials such as a vacuum cleaner, mop, dustpan and brush etc.
      The internet cost for the accomodation had to brought for £150 this was for a 2mb connection for your time at the accomodation, this is an essential which every student would most probably of had to buyed, i found the internet was very quick in the accomodation and was very happy with my purchase. You could pay a bit extra if you wanted a 10mb connection and you could also buy little adds if you wanted to get your games console online etc.
      There was also a charge for the electricity/water bills, that was a one off fee of £350 which was payed before we got the accomodation, i constantly left my computer and electrical devices on to try and get my moneys worth. There was also a deposit which had to be paid upon arrival of £250 which i have now recieved back, this covers any damages which may have been caused to your accomodation.
      Overall the accomodation was a very nice stay amd i am very pleased with choosing to stay there for my first year at Sheffield Hallam, i have even chose to stay with unite at again because i'm soo happy with the service they provide.

      ***Nightlife***
      One of the great things about Sheffield is the nightlife, having soo many different kinds of bars, clubs and pubs to suit everyones taste in music. The union is also a very good venue for Sheffield Hallam students, each day of the week at the union there is a different theme, Monday is pounded where all selected drinks are a pound such as VKs, selected beer bottles, shots etc. The union is split up into three different rooms, the main room which plays the top chart music, the retro room which has like spice girls and a bit of cheese, then theres the indie room which plays all your top indie anthems such as pulp, oasis etc. Its a great night out for any Hallam student, the atmpshephere in the club is great and the bouncers arent to bad.
      The union also has a phoenix bar which is open during the daytime, this offers really quite cheap drinks, music and has pool tables and pub quiz machines to keep everyone entertained.
      The city also offers a great range of other clubs such as Leadmill, this is really close to the student union about a 2 minute walk, its an indie club, which offers very cheap drinks and great music for anyone into the indie or general chart music, very cheap night out on Mondays and Wednesdays when they offer the 60p drinks on selected drinks, Leadmill also offer a text messaging offer, where if you text they will give you deals such as free entry which is pretty cool. For people into there heavy rock music theres a club called Corporation, this is a pretty grimey club, which is very big and very friendly, i have been there on a few occasions and had some really great nights out, the drinks are also very cheap in here, the drinks prices are are about £1.50 double vodka and coke, the club is also split into rooms based on which floor your on, the stairs are normally very slippy though so be careful. If your into your rap/hip hop music then there best places to go would be cellar 35 and crystal both of these places will suit your needs, i have only been to crystal on the odd occasion because i'm not really into this music genre, but my mates who have been on regular occasions really enjoy the night out here.
      Embrace is probably the biggest nightclub your going to find in Sheffield, its right in the city centre and has the structure of like a football stadium on one side of it, it looks pretty cool from the outside. I have been here on quite a few occasions and have had some very good nights out, the only problem is its soo bigged and usually very packed its soo hard to find your mates after you've been toilet or brought a drink. The music in here is your top charts, theres an indie and cheese room also. Another thing i like about this club is theres a chill out area at the top of the nightclub with nice seats and a relaxing atmopshere.

      ***Teaching style***
      The teaching style for my first year was very good, i had both lectures and seminars, the lectures were very good for getting information before you started the seminar work and were very useful, they were taught very well by all my lecture tutors and the sound was very clear from the speakers. The seminars were also very good for learning, the teaching styles were very good and you get treated like an adult, not like secondary school.

      I enjoyed my first year very much at Sheffield Hallam and i hope this review is useful to anyone looking at starting university in the future.

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        21.04.2002 23:13
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        A stonkingly huge ex-polytechnic (one of the first polys in the country) based in the Hallam area of Sheffield in the city, with two other fairly large campuses not far away. Hallam has more than 20,000 students, half of which are classed as "mature" (over 21 when on the course). There are also significant amounts of international students, students on distance learning courses and students on sandwich courses (where you take a year out to go into the world of industry mid-degree). The place has three campuses, the business/tech minded City campus, the teacher training college of Collegiate Crescent and the artistic base of Psalter Lane. The place feels more like a gigantic sixth-form than a University, with serious, mature students running to lessons then running home to their families. This means there is a dreadful lack of societies (around 7 general interest societies if you take away those related to sport, nationality, religion or subject choice). There is a definite "get in, get your degree, get out, get a job" mentality, with a lack of student community. Hallam can be a lonely place, but the students are serious and thoughtful (although you do get some losers), and the mature undergraduates bring an air of, well, maturity to the place. Relations with locals are excellent, mainly because Hallam is made up of locals! The intimidatingly excellent "proper" University of Sheffield up the road rarely bothers Hallam students, who just get on and do their own thing. The two institutions barely acknowledge each other at all, although Hallam students often visit Sheffield's Union facilities to escape the shabby inadequacy of their own. If you are a bit of an artsy dreamer you may find Hallam's determination to be vocational intimidating. While everyone else is off on their placement year you may get the feeling that the humanities don't count at Hallam. There isn't a lot of learning
        for learning's sake at SHU, everyone is very practical and the student politics tend to be mainstream. Indeed Hallam students can often be pretty uninvolved, while I attended SHU the head of the Student Representative council described her own fellow Hallamers as "lazy and apathetic"! Hallam students are often people who felt they have left education too soon, and are coming back for another try with an incredibly determined attitude, meaning socialising is often on the back burner. However there are some great facilities, from the modern Adsetts Centre (a library!) in the City (although nothing there for humanities/arts students), to the newly refurbished library at Collegiate. The shabby and undeveloped Union facility called the NMB is heading for a much-needed refurbishment soon (now done but only the downstairs bar). Some students complain that class sizes are too large and there is little personal tutor attention, this is a problem which differs from course to course, but does exist. Bullying can occur, too. SHU feels like a work in progress, improvements are always being made such as refits to Collegiate's library (three major refits while I was there) which can be annoying wile you're there, I just hope future students appreciate the better facilities. Sheffield itself is an ugly city. There's no getting away from it, it is generally architecturally grim and isn't as prosperous as northern cities like Leeds or Newcastle. However Sheffield people are like gold, friendly, warm, down to earth but not brusque like many Yorkshire folk. It is fairly cheap to live there but don't expect a lot of help from SHU's housing department. Not even all first years are accomodated in halls, and SHU needs to invest in this area. To be honest, Hallam isn't a good choice if you are looking for a good time. If, however you are determined to get started with an industry that SHU is involved in, you pro
        bably couldn't find a better, more focused institution. I would class SHU as a degree machine. If you like being left to your own devices, good. If you want a tight-knit community and lots of involvement in your studies and social life, avoid the place. More needs to be done to get the career prospects of art graduates on a similar level to the employer-focused technical subjects. I was lucky enough to write the SHU opinion for the 2000 Virgin guide, but to be honest I wasn't as critical as I should, and space was limited, I hope this review gives a bigger and more detailed picture. Thanks.

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          26.10.2001 21:12
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          A good honest Northern uni. They'll be no student bashing here thanks but it got your attention hopefully. Here we go another opinion. The recession is coming or in our case, seems to have just arrived. Never mind hey, you get to sit and write opinions. So I’m getting paid for my job and getting paid peanuts for writing opinions. But I like peanuts. Especially when they are roasted. They go down with a good packet of pork scratchings and them scampi fries. Anyway I digress. I’m here to write an opinion on Sheffield Hallam and an opinion I shall write. All in all the place is a good one. It’s full of students which is the downside but the upside is that many are female. I admire female flesh but not muscle and so Sheffield Hallam is the right place for me. Getting into Sheffield Hallam is a doddle. Just get mediocre results at A levels, knob off all the other offers and point your Fiat Panda firmly in the direction of South Yorkshire. You’ll get in no sweat and won’t be disappointed. It used to be a Polytechnic, so technically it’s a technical college although the only technical things I saw were buildings going up left, right and centre. They’ve had £41 million input into modernising many parts of the university. Very technical but I was there to study German and Business so the only technology I would be using was a PC and I wouldn’t be designing them. Most people in my position are worried about only a handful of things when they go to university. The boy / girl ratio, whether the nightlife is dazzling enough, the beer price and accommodation. Ok, some get pedantic and want to know what their courses have in store for them. I didn’t, I was just happy to get out of Glossop (see my Glossop opinion to find out why). Actually Sheffield is also a chicken town but on the rougher end of the chickenometer scale. It was a steel town, ‘was’ being the operat
          ive word. It is now a layabout town. The city would I’m sure be dead as a Mammoth if it weren’t for the 25,000 students that inhabit it. Students are there to bring in to the city parent’s, taxpayers and student loan companys’ money. Students are there to waste it on buying pizzas in Tescos, keeping the local kebab shops open, fattening the wallets of the barmen and landlords and generally creating short term profit for here one day gone tomorrow businesses on Ecclesall Road. You can’t blame them for any of that. Thank them, they make the city worth living in. It is built on 7 hills. Legend has it that these are the graves of 7 giant coal gatherers of a time long gone. Sheffield folk believe anything, the natives are a bit dumb. Nah, only joking don’t be fooled by their ‘What’s up Ducky?’ accents. The hills are actually rumoured to be 7 hills, part of the Pennine backbone of England. I’m sure that’s a much more feasible account for their existence. I can only speak for the course I did and not any others. My experience with it was that it is fairly straightforward and definitely not as hard as most of the things you are forced at gunpoint to do in A levels. The organisation of the uni was fairly poor. Things seemed to take an eternity to happen. But don’t let that put you off, it’s easier to get deadline extensions because of it. Going out. Going out of the front door is often a difficult challenge for many Students. Take a deep breathe, a glass of water to wash away the cannabis-infected hangover and open the door. You’ll be greeted with, if you live in a lucky area of Sheffield, a breath of fresh Pennine air. If not, you’ll die of car fume inhalation. Venture further and you’ll find a whole array of bars, cafes, clubs and pubs. The best streets by far are Ecclesall Road and West Street although the centre has a few good
          places to visit. Stay away from the Jolly Buffer though . It’s a gay bar. That’s unless you are gay. Then frequent it as often as you like. Then there are the rest of the pubs. I’d better start with the NMB, the Nelson Mandela Building. It’s the Student Union aptly named for no apt reason. I hate those arty farty names for student buildings. That’s one thing I can’t stand about students. Not all students, just some. They are, I repeat, arty farty. Not normal. Mostly nice though. It has some right cheesy nights does the NMB and the student pub under the club upstairs is a mess. But the beer is cheap and you don’t sit warbling about the state of the wallpaper when you’re three sheets to the wind do you. Having said that it’s best to be drunk in most of the ‘traditional’ pubs in Sheffield, especially on London road. There are a lot of dives. You’l lfind this out for yourself. But then there are a lot of nice renovated pubs like the Nursery Tavern, the Slug and fiddle and the other one next to Kwikfit (someone please remind me of the name of this one). They have a brilliant Karioke night, the best I’ve ever been to. If you’re not too good the DJ gets the crowd to sing ‘der da der da you’re crap, der da der da you’re crap!’ (sing to the der da der song). I’m not one for cheese although my girlfriend drags me out to a few 70s and 80s nights like Stardust above the union. I’m also not one for dying my hair green and joining all the other tosspots at Gatecrasher. What is that all about? A generation in rebellion? I think not. A generation of idiots. I like the ballroom at City Hall. Every month the big Blackpool tower organ pops out of the floor and we all have a waltz. No, I lie. It’s the 70s and 80s night I’m on about. There is cheese dressed up as a 70s / 80s night like Stardust (just
          mentioned) and then there is quality which is also 70s / 80s night. This is to be found at City Hall. It is excellent. There is a mix of people there, students and locals and all get on well. No fights, no agro, just everyone dressed up in 70s gear poncing around on the john Travolta style coloured dance floor. I love it. So there is Sheffield Hallam and Sheffield in a nutshell. I could go on but I won’t.

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            12.02.2001 19:33
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            Every morning we used to have to get up and eat a lump of coal.... So said that most famous of skeches by Monty Python. But really, truthfully, what's it like up north? More specifically, what's it like in Sheffield. Studying in Sheffield is great fun. A city sandwiched between Leeds and Nottingham it's within easy reach of the two. But then again, with so much taking place in the city I never felt the need to venture out of the centre. It's not the most beautiful of places with concrete monolyth's marking the landscapes. Set on 7 hills there is a fair bit of walking to do as well, but cast that aside and you will be in for some pleasant surprises. A little statistic here: there are a higher proportion of students staying on in Sheffield after they have completed their study than any other university in England, and, if you like plenty of greenery this is the place to be!! Lots of a parks and a bus service that will whisk you away into the middle of a the peaks in about 25 minutes. Perfect for Sunday mornings and a nice change from any other capital city. On nightlife music tends to be House and Garage leaning on the cheesy side. But then you could always hop on a train up to Leeds for something a little bit more underground. There are lots and lots and lots of students and many clubs which, although serve up the same music, are great venues. Hallam University has one of the most eclectic course offerings through the land with courses offered on a modular basis. What this means is that you can literally build a course to suit your needs. As the demands increase for graduates with less traditional degrees you can be sure to find a course that will make the best use of both your skills and interests. Happy studying!!

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              20.07.2000 21:04
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              Firstly Ihatebroccolli, I hate broccoli too. But to the point, I can agree with you that the artistic students have pulled the short straw but one has to look into the reasoning for this. In my humble opinion the subjects taught at the psalter lane campus are all vacational subjects studied mainly because the students have a love for the subject. Unfortunatly the jobs resulting for these subjects are mostly on the basis of either you can or you can't, Its surly not a matter of knowledge aquired during studying but a mixture between natural talent and common sense. you mentioned in your article that there was a lack of career infomation, no placements and no help to hone the skills needed to gain entry to the market place, to that I can only say that hone-ing should be/have been provided, But regarding the other two. How can the uni be expected to help when the market is flooded with hords of students from the most usefull of subects. Ps, what was your timetable like, 7 hours a week, 3 of which spent in the cinema, or do film studies students have even less hours then the film and liturature students??? As for the other more general comments, I agree completly.

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                19.07.2000 05:52
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                Having just graduated in Film from "the art campus up the road from the actual University!". I am living proof that Arts students do actually do some work. I have read the other reviews of SHU which have all been very informative, but have all been from ex-students from computing backgrounds or from those predominantly at the City campus. The University is now based on three campuses - City (in the City centre surprise surprise!), Collegiate Crescent (just off the busy student area of Ecclesall Road), and last and definitely least - Psalter Lane Campus (about 4 miles from the centre of town up a very large hill). My degree was gained studying at Psalter Lane Campus (or Psalter Lane Arts College as the inmates like to refer to it), so I can best describe the situation there. The campus began life as a "Blue Coat" school, and still has the air of a souped up secondary school about it. You almost expect to hear the dinner bell being rung in the playground, upon which most of the theory-based courses are now taught in a series of porter cabins. It is basically an adapted technical college, with the original working studios in two of the buildings, and a library which is a listed building. The "library" however, really should be condemed for its lack of books - bearing in mind the several million pound "Adsetts Centre" built at the City centre campus for the use of "everybody" but actually only containing books for computing, science, and the generally technical or maths-based subjects. So, where does this leave the poor Film Studies student I hear you ask? Don't get me wrong, there are usually plenty of televideos free for viewing films in Psalter library, but the library itself is pretty much a joke. It is situated in a series of white painted rooms, rather like a doctor's surgery, and the books, many of which are extremely old and often disorganised and in piles o
                n the floor, are few and frequently "in processing" or "in repair". It is confusingly laid out, and many of the books are either 1 day loan (and you are charged £2 a day if you fail to return them on time!)or they are 4 week loans (and there's only 1 copy for an entire class!) - I reserved a 4 week loan book which there was only one copy of for use during writing my dissertation, and by the time I actually got hold of it, my thesis was due in! Generally though, there is a nice atmosphere at Psalter, (although it can be a little cliquey at times) which makes up somewhat for the place itself. The lecturers are friendly and always willing to help. The only big problem I really had with my course (Film Studies) was the complete lack of teaching in relating the course and what we had learnt as part of it, to the world outside University. We were never given any careers advice, never told what options we had after leaving University. Whereas other courses such as in computing or science, students were offered work placements, given practise interviews, generally shown how to hone their skills in order to market themselves effectively and to get a job at the end of their University lives. Arts students at SHU must fend for themselves apparently! Psalter Lane aside, Sheffield is a lovely, friendly and attractive city, and the City campus is a modern and professional environment in which to study your (non-Arts) subject. Business and computing courses are very well taught I've been told. The main student union could have much better provision for entertainment, as, unfortunately, SHU loses most of the passing bands and artists to Sheffield University, as their concert venues are far superior. Collegiate Crescent Campus is an extremely attractive place to study - especially since the revamp and extention to the old library. Students (mostly English, History and Communication Studies)
                study in large old houses set in leafy surroundings, rather reminiscent of parts of Oxford. It is rumoured that Psalter Lane Campus (which is to be pulled down in 2002 and the arts subjects to be rehoused)is to move either into the Cultural Industries Quarter in the city, or moved into existing buildings on Collegiate Crescent - so perhaps there is hope yet! There, my rant is over!

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                  10.07.2000 17:10
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                  ****UPDATE**** SEE BOTTOM OF REVIEW - MORE ADDED TO THIS REVIEW... Just an additional note on SHU... Although the first review is quite correct in it's analysis of the uni in most aspects, there are some other factors to consider. On the IT courses (under the odd banner of Computing and Management Department) there is a strong bias towards placements and business skills which I believe is very useful. The sandwich placement scheme basically runs in the third year of a lot of the technical degrees at SHU and makes degrees last that extra year - another advantage for work shy students! Students graduate with a years industrial placement, and a Honours degree meaning they break out of the awful Catch 22 of no experience/cant get a job to get some experience. The placements are paid, and offer students a chance to blow all their wages on extra amounts of drink and PCs. :) Having almost completed mine, I feel that I have a much higher chance of being employed when I leave, and many placement companies offer jobs after your final year. The foreign lecturers do not seem to fit in terribly well into the university, as many of them have great problems in communicating using English. Quite often I have had to correct a tutors spelling or occasionally technical information. A little more about the Psalter Lane campus: The arts subjects are very very poorly managed and run. I hear some appalling stories of lecturers antics within the Cultural Studies Department. The campus itself is an old school building with the obligitory mobile classrooms, smell of disinfectant and canteen. I suspect these arts courses are run to ensure the university keeps its University status or something, as nowhere near as much funding or effort is going into these subjects. The Psalter lane campus is to be moved into the city campus in the next
                  year or so I am told. Overall, the university is a good place to learn, the people are nice, and Sheffield is a brilliant place for anyone to live, I assure you! This review is due to be published in the Virgin University Guide 2001. Location One of the best things about Sheffield is that it is reasonably central, and (as the prospectus no doubt crows about) its right on the doorstep of the Peak District. A great place to go to chill out after those deadline blues. Accessible by train (around 2-3 hours journey, depending on the direction of the wind, leaves, lunar phase et al) and by road alike, it remains the best place to study anywhere in the UK. Students Well, an incredible 12% of Sheffield's population are students, and this lends itself towards a very broad range of students within the city walls. Right from working-class-kid-scraped-through-on-a-BTEC-and-through- clearing sort, to Mummy-and-Daddy-paid-for-my-flat-and-course-fees-darling types...they're all here in the city. Sheffield Hallam University has more working class students than Sheffield University does, but we all seem to get along fairly well, and we are of course allowed to use each others' Union bars/women/blokes* *delete as appropriate Campus SHU is based around three sites. City, Collegiate Crescent, and Psalter Lane. Psalter Lane being the runt of the pack, with it's school-like corridors, and grim exterior, it is small wonder that the university are aiming to move out of there within the next two years. Rumour has it that they may move into the National Centre for Popular Music. You know, the grotesque curling stone things you see on TV once in a while. No? Well if you haven't seen this building think "Millennium Dome in Steel". Nice. Anyway, the drums of steel have to be an improvement o
                  n Psalter Lane - those poor art students deserve something better. Collegiate campus is really quite good; offering a more traditional leafy campus environment it is ideally placed on the revelation that is Ecclesall Road. For those who do not know Sheffield "Eccy Road" is probably the hub of all Student entertainment, with about 830 bars and 6000 coffee houses (well, maybe not as many as that, but after the first 5 pubs, who cares?!). It is ideally placed, and looks quite stunning in the Summer. City Campus is excellent too. Based around 4 or 5 disparate buildings, all connected with the stunningly designed Atrium. This glass/steel construction has masses of open space, and is like a cosmopolitan street cafe with tables and chairs and... well.. a cafe. The Adsetts Centre is based here as well, offering 24 access to computers, Internet, books, photocopying etc etc. Fortunately, the annoying library staff who seem to fine me on a weekly basis, dont work 24 hours. City campus is centrally located, and contains specialist and general work areas for the various schools which make up Hallam University. Social Life / Pubs / Bars / Clubs I could write a book as thick as this one just listing the nights out in Sheffield. So what I will do is point out the obvious places to go, and where to avoid. In terms of the University owned bars, there's the NMB - based on City Campus; bang in the centre of town. A medium sized bar called the HUB[Hallam Union Bar]. There are some smaller bars within the complex, too, but I cannot remember this weeks names for them! There are smaller representations at the two other campus (namely Psalter Lane, and Collegiate Crescent). NMB (The HUB) - Cheap food, always busy, and some different entertainment such as giant Connect 4 and brand new arcade games. One promo at the moment is Who Wants To Be A Lira-onaire! There
                  are plenty of cheap beer offers on, such as BOGOF (thats Buy One Get One Free, as opposed to unfriendly barstaff). There are a variety of nights on at the NMB. Some good, and well attended, others not so. One thing that will strike a lot of people is the sheer variety of the nights. Based in the "Works" venue, the nights include: Stardust - The obligatory 70's night. Every Friday. Three quid to get in, on the door and one pound in advance and usually very busy. Bottles and vodka mixers for £1 every week. Dissolution - Playing darkwave, industrial gabba etc, this is usually well attended and open to non-NUS cardholders. Full of goths, great if this is your kind of thing. Doghouse - Basically a new night for me, this is the Rock/Alternative night. Aimed at Skate/Punk/Alternative types, this runs once a month. Phenomen@ - Tapping into the R+B school of music, this night is for anyone listening to the latest garage/r&b sounds. DJ Swing, winner of a MOBO award was DJing for Intro Week. Although this music doesn't appeal to me to be honest - my garage is full of rubbish and so is theirs! The Wham Bar is based at the Psalter Lane arts campus. Although it sounds rather 80s, the bar is definitely up to date, and even has space for students to show off their artwork to fellow students... pretty smart if you are so inclined. The Collegiate Crescent bar is called Forgers, and is rather small, but tends to get rather busy thanks to the nearby Halls of Residence. A good place to go after exams, which are often held at this campus. Outside of the university, there are a huge number of places to go drinking. Special mentions must go to the Bankers Draft, and Weatherspoons, which offer some great deals on food and drink. Current deals include Fosters for a quid, two meals for a fiver all day, and a Beer and Burger meal for 2.
                  99. Bargain! As far as student clubbing goes, theres plenty of choice. Sheffield University makes up for the lack of guitar led music nights with Fuzz Club. Alongside top bands appearing at the Leadmill and the Octagon, there are some smaller yet worthwhile venues such as the Boardwalk. Of course, there are the obvious Gatecrasher nights at Republic, and sister venue Bed to entertain the masses and their glow-sticks. Wherever you go of an evening, you're pretty safe, as Sheffield has been voted the safest city to be in at night recently. There are usually enough people around to feel safe, and the city centre is well lit and well serviced by late public transport. See www.firstmainline.co.uk Accommodation Sheffield is renowned for having cheap living costs. Not only can you find somewhere to live cheaply, but you can stock your fridge cheaply as well. There are a large number of supermarkets, and places selling goods at student discounts to make your grants/loans/whatever last longer. Housing varies from excellent (Victoria Halls, Nether Edge) to pretty nasty (City Road, Shorham Street). You can expect to pay anything from 30 quid per week for a shoe box sized room, to about 45 quid for a nice en-suite securely accessed flat in a complex such as Victoria Halls. The university guarantee that all first year students get accommodation at SHU run housing, or in closely monitored private residences. This is a definite parent-friendly point to note, as finding a house, and potentially living with smelly fridge-raiding strangers is not the most endearing part of student life. Finding housing can be made easier at the start of term when house hunting teams are formed, in co-operation with the university housing team, and groups of like-minded individuals can find somewhere to admire the various mould cultures that student
                  housing can offer. Please be careful with contracts, too - don't bother with securing housing over the summer, it is costly, and often you can find better places by waiting a little longer. Landlords are the bad guy in the soap-opera that is student life, so be warned! The teaching within my School (Computing and Management Science) is on the whole very good. Although there are the odd rogue lecturers, I cannot fault the department for what they offer in terms of specialist knowledge and resources. On the IT courses there is a strong bias towards placements and business skills which I believe is very useful. It is invaluable when going into the real world of work. Some degrees, mainly the vocational ones, have a sandwich placement scheme that y runs in the third year. This makes degrees last that extra year - another advantage for work shy students! Students graduate with a years industrial placement, and a Honours degree meaning they break out of the awful Catch 22 of no experience/cant get a job to get some experience. It is little wonder then, that SHU have an excellent employment record for graduates - beating that of the "other" university in Sheffield even. On a less positive note some of the overseas lecturers employed at SHU do not seem to fit in terribly well into the university, as some of them have great problems in communicating using English. Quite often I have had to correct a tutor's spelling, or occasionally their technical information. Although reflecting Sheffield's multicultural environment, it is perhaps down to the university to check that these staff can communicate their obvious technical expertise correctly. Sport There are wonderful opportunities within Sheffield to watch, and play, sport of all kind. From a successful Ice Hockey team, to two top football teams (well, one, anywa
                  y!) to Olympic standard swimming and diving facilities, to rugby league, to championship winning basketball teams, to student games hosting athletics tracks, theres choice for everyone. The facilities are very cheap, and are usually subject to student discounts. In summary, Sheffield is a friendly, cheap place to live with an amazing nightlife and sporting scene. The courses at Sheffield Hallam University are generally sound, and offer students a more practical and useful degree from such things as Industrial Placements, and ties with local businesses. I would have no hesitation in recommending the university to parents and students alike, and I can assure both parties that they will be pleased with choosing Sheffield *winks*.

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                    29.06.2000 18:07
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                    Sheffield Hallam University has some of the best courses, best results, is very well regarded by industry, and is flying high in the university league tables. That's what they told us at the open day. I'm not convinced that I'm attending the same university that they were talking about. Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) started out life years ago as some kind of technical college. It kept growing and growing, reaching various now defunct levels of the education system before becoming a polytechnic, and eventually a few years back a real pretend university. I suppose it's because of this background (and I imagine that many college>poly>uni institutions are in a similar situation) that the campus itself is a bit of a mixed up old place. There are in fact three main campuses. The big one in the city centre is in places quite impressive. Not too long ago, a large fortune was spent on a futuristic 'learning centre' (that'd be a library with some computers in it then...) which is very nice indeed. Lots of computers which nearly always work to some degree or another, and lots of books, some pretty good ones among them, and a good attempt at having lots of copies of the books that everyone will want to read. Next door to the learning centre is the heart of the campus, a collection of four or five confusingly named buildings housing lecture theatres, teaching rooms, computing labs, offices - everything university-y, really. Upon walking into the building, you find yourself in the light and spacious Atrium. This is little more than an expensive (thought quite beautiful) corridor linking the buildings that surround you, but it's a nice place to get something to eat, or browse the bookshop incorporated into the university. Adjoining the Atrium is the University's main lecture theatre, and very impressive it is too. Four hundred(ish) seats, tiered like a theatre with reasonably comfortable cinema style seats, and large screens ca
                    pable of showing TV, video, output from a computer, you name it. These are the things they showed us on the open day. Once you're actually studying at the university, the picture isn't always so pretty. I don't know much about the two campuses away from the city centre. The Collegiate Crescent campus is a sprawling affair, some of it in pretty stone buildings down tree-lined roads. I've only ever been inside the sports hall, which was far to similar to my school hall for comfort. Far, far away, and up a bit of a big hill, is the Psalter Lane campus - a special place for all the arty students. Again, I don't know too much about it, apart from that the building is an old school or college, and it really does have a wandering around the school corridors feel to it. I'm quite fortunate, as my course is based in one of the prettier city centre buildings, which is quite clean and modern. Certain modules have however taken me to other buildings, the mildly unpleasant twelve story building (a building that seems to be perpetually shaken by violent building work, and which I'm sure moves too much when it's windy) to the deeply unpleasant Dyson House - reached by a perilous journey across several busy road junctions and roundabouts and which turns out to be dirty, a little bit smelly, and is just generally beaten up and broken in every way. Dyson House has now, I hear been taken out of use. Smelly or not though, the facilities are pretty good, and always fit for their purpose. The same can't always be said for all of the staff (though admittedly, none of them are particularly smelly). Before I say anything, I must stress that I don't have a wide experience of educational institutions. I'm quite sure that many of the things I talk about are common at universities (or perhaps more in the ex-polytechnics) all over the country. Certainly if the further education college I attended is anything to go by the whole education
                    system is one big disorganised mess. The organisation of my course has been erratic. The first year went fine, as my course (computing) has a common first year, no matter which branch of the subject you are studying. After that however, when the large group splits up, starts studying different things, and choosing options, the staff seem to get a little confused. On one occasion, we arrived at the start of a new semester, having carefully considered and chosen our options over the summer to find that the whole thing had been changed. Most of the chosen options were now a mandatory part of the course, and we now had a couple of days to choose again. Not a welcoming start to a new year. Most of the lecturers themselves are actually pretty good an know their stuff, though they are not always as good at communicating their knowledge as they are at understanding it. Slightly worrying is the university's policy of employing foreign tutors with little or no knowledge of English, and in some cases dubious knowledge of the subject they are teaching. The course itself has been quite disappointing. While promising to concentrate on quite specific subjects, it has often wandered back towards general computing, or even topics entirely unrelated to the chosen subject. But hey, a degree is a degree, right? And to be honest, sometimes (often, in fact) the whole university seems only to be bothered about getting as many graduates as possible, and to hell with anything that gets in the way of that. It sounds like I'm really slagging the place off, but in fact, I'm fairly happy here, even if what I'm getting isn't quite what I'm told I'd be getting. At the end of the day, it's a nice enough place to study, well equipped, with it's share of good lecturers, and it gives out degrees which get people jobs. I'm sure I'd have had a bit of a go at whichever university I might have ended up at. I'd better just say something about S
                    heffield itself. It seems to get a lot of hype as a fantastic student town, and it is actually a pretty nice place to live. For nights out, there are a couple of main areas to head for. West street, leading away from the city centre, and the Hallam University, towards the 'real' University of Sheffield, is just one long street with pubs at very regular intervals - ideal for a pub crawl, and nice as it mixes the students from both universities. Also popular is Eccleshall Road. Just out of the city centre, the road passes SHU's Collegiate Crescent campus, and has it's share of pubs, and plenty of places to eat. SHU has it's own union bar, or course, in the Nelson Mandela Building. It's really quite horrible, and doesn't even offer the advantage of cheap beer. Hallam students can use their student union card to get into the much nicer and cheaper University of Sheffield union bar. There are of course nice and less nice places to live. The students tend to congregate around some of the more pleasant areas, where you'll find rent to be around £35-£40 a week. If you want to rough it you could probably find somewhere for as little as £25, but I doubt you'd hold on to your stereo for very long. Stick to the nice (or even fairly nice) areas, and you should be quite happy to wander your way home in a drunken stupor without fear of mugging or violence. Sheffield Hallam University. Pretty good place to study, nice place to live.

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