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3 Reviews

"Features: “No Volt” exclusive Polti patented controls. Extra A1P water boiler. Safety cap – exclusive Polti patent. Pressure-operated switch. Continuous Steam regulation from 0 to 80g/min. Four sturdy wheels for easy transport. Standard supply accessories: Flexible tube with “No Volt” Steam pistol. Two extension tubes, Large brush, Small brush, 120o Tool, Glass cleaning set, “No-Drip” refill bottle, Cotton cloth, Sponge cover, Instruction video cassette."

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    3 Reviews
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      22.09.2002 21:07
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      Dooyoo is cool even if a little tepid at the moment. Our splendid writers produce cool reviews. And, as the guy on the tv advertisement says, "Cool costs me Money!". More than once I have read an opinion on a home appliance which has had me reaching for a credit card and driving down to Comet or diving into a website to use it. I bought my Dyson DC04 that way and it plays havoc with my income/expenditure. When this happens I don't feel I can write an op on it because it has already been done so well. But my enthusiasm for the Polti Home Steamer is still at a high, and time has passed. My Varoretto 2001R is a neat apple green tank 18" long by 12" at the widest point of it's curved body, and sits on smoothly running, partly inset wheels. The whole thing just slides away under my stairs to wait patiently hidden until needed again. The only flaw I found was that the wheels needed attaching before first use, and I eventually had to push very hard indeed to insert them. All very well, but a little worrying when you have a brand new machine and don't want to be rough on it. I will interrupt my description to tell you what it does, because I just can't wait to amaze you. The water within the tank heats to 230 degrees and the steam produced not only cleans extraordinarily well any surface, but we are told kills bacteria, allergens, fleas, bed mites and even viruses. The viruses I can't verify, but that is what they say. The good thing is that the vapour dries almost immediately, hence a mattress, upholstery and carpets are not left wet. However if you wish to take the creases from curtains or give your indoor plants a treat, a small knob on the tank will turn to reduce the heat without losing steam. At the lowest temperature I have placed my hand safely in front of the hand-held pistol which directs the steam. The water is measured into a plastic container which curves at one end i
      nto a spout. After placing one finger over the spout, tipping it upside down and then inserting into the tank entrance, the bottle sits on top and glugs away until emptied into the machine. The pressure cap, which is then screwed on the tank, ensures that it cannot be opened until the pressure reduces as it cools. The safety features on the Polti are very good indeed, including a sliding button on the grip which deactivates the steam should you wish to put it down for a while. They do seem to have thought of everything in this direction. There are 2 oblong buttons which light when the machine is activated. One is a heating indicator, the other concerns the attachments you are using. The Polti is designed for such ease of use that I have never felt the drag of having to put together an appliance before use. Some home machines do great things, but I wonder sometimes if it is worth the effort of getting them ready for use. Not so with the Polti Steamer. A decent length of hose with a pistol grip at one end from which the steam issues and a flat socket at the other, which fits into the end of the steamer and is secured with a large button, is attached. Just hold the pistol grip, depress the trigger beneath your finger and steam gushes out. Direct it over the surface you are cleaning (anything from tiles to fabrics to mirrors to windows) and then, using the other hand, wipe over with a cloth. You will have 2 flat extensions which click onto the pistol grip and then each other as you add length. Each extension has the same outlet as the pistol grip, so other attachments just clip on as easily or they can be used without the additions. We are talking seconds here for connection. I just wheel out my Polti, place the extensions and attachments to hand and start. The attachments are a large brush for carpets, a smaller version of this and a marvelous window scraper, through which steam is released and which you then p
      ull downwards over a rubber strip which then is followed by the scraper. To be honest I find it as easy to use a cloth to wipe over windows after steaming. With these come a crevice tool for those minute gaps and all are of sturdy quality, but light to handle. A video supplied with the new steamer clearly demostrates it's use. A handy thought that. With the attachments come a large ribbed cloth to use as a wiper or be placed over the brushes, and the carpet brush is used with the cloth clipped on. That's the techie stuff. Now for the relationship between myself and my Polti. My dislike of housework would be easier to live with if it wasn't that I like things to be clean. My way of dealing with this has always been a quick dust and vacuum, whilst making sure that the important bits are hygienic, and then a binge taking most of a morning or afternoon. Occasionally I would be very good indeed and wash the paintwork. All this has now changed for the better. My house has a lot of glass. The windows are large and my porch is fully glazed. In the past this meant a bucket of soapy water, a window scraper and a ladder to be hauled through the house and placed precariously on the front doorstep. Added to this some kitchen roll to finish the job, so once more up the stepladder. Oooh! It's a pleasure now. I wake up my Polti, give it 15 minutes to heat up while I read a few ops, then it obediently follows me outside and sits quietly on the step while I steam away. Move it over a few feet and the front downstairs windows are shining. Back inside the porch and away we go again. That's it. No bucket or ladder, or water running down my upstretched arm. Although my Dyson does a good job, it still leaves some dog hairs. This I discovered when the Polti left convenient skeins of hair to be easily picked up from the floor. Added to this is the fact that when I clean a room it takes no extra effort
      to run the steam over my white paintwork and wipe down. As a smoker, after the first use of the steamer I have yet to pick up nicotine on the cloth. Direct the steam into the top of a radiator and watch the dust disappear; that overlooked chocolate which has marred the new armchair just melts , dissipates and leaves the upholstery as before. I was horrified when I directed the steam at the edges of the kitchen hob. You know, where it is too closely attached to the work surface to expect any grease to collect? Brown liquid oozed out of a space I would have thought was non-existent. My bathroom and kitchen floors are left sparkling and dry all at once and I am left with a feel good factor which I have not experienced before after housework. The deodorising effect is pure magic and the steam removes any residual tobacco or doggy smells. I have not been aware of any very often, but am concious of the ozone clean smell once I have used it. Surfaces stay dust free as well for longer, although this could be because I use a micro cloth while steaming. Although little water is used, it seems to go a long way and needs recharging only once if I am doing most of the house. Since the pressure cap prevents the tank being opened until the Polti has cooled it can take about 20 minutes plus the 15 minutes or so to reheat. By turning off the heat button, leaving on the attachment light and then squeezing the trigger a lot of pressure is released, which will cut down this time. I have no problem with this as I just get back to dooyooing while I wait. Now for the not so cool bit. This baby is expensive. Advertised for £349, I bought mine for £299 + £3.50 delivery from Comet Online. Since I had earmarked money for a new kitchen at the time, I decided not to bother with the dishwasher. For me this was a wise choice. If I could only have one home cleaning appliance it would be without question the Polti 2001R. &l
      t; br> <br >

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        02.04.2002 05:00
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        “Yes! Yes! I’m coming, I’m coming…!” Heart thudding with desire, I’ve raced down the stairs, keen to lay hands on the parcel beyond the front door, and am tearing open the packaging before you can say “Whoopee! My steam cleaner’s here!” Reasonably small in size given what it’s capable of, the Polti Vaporetto 2001R more than makes up for this nod towards unobtrusiveness by being a violent lime green in colour. I worked out that with the hose removed, there would be enough room for it to live out of sight with Basil the hoover (so named because he’s forever faulty), and set about putting the thing together. With more strength than I thought I possessed (and a few cuss-words I didn’t realise I knew), the wheels were eventually on and it was finally ready to roll. I found the awkwardly shaped filler bottle to be about as much use as a codpiece in a convent, refusing to part company with much of its contents, and given to launching its nozzle into the tank - creating a vacuum of such force that it was difficult to remove it without having previously eaten three Shredded Wheat. After just two or three uses, it now sits redundantly under the sink, abandoned in favour of an ordinary jug. The cleaner itself was a different matter. Being the kind of person who disinfects every door-handle in the house as well as the banister at the first sign of any stomach bug (and was once famously caught doing the same thing at work when I thought no-one was looking), if it could live up to its claims, it was always going to find a home with me. It’s said to frazzle all those gruesome germs and blow their remains off this mortal coil with dry steam heated to 120 degrees centigrade, released under sufficient pressure to reach into spaces so tiny that previously only the germs could get into, blasting out dirt and grime at the same time. Armed with rags to polish up the corpses (
        old bar towels are ideal – hard wearing and a doddle to chuck in the washing machine), I filled it with water and waited for it to heat up, my trigger finger itching ‘Clint Eastwood’ style all the while. Around ten minutes passed, and then the relevant light went out. All systems ‘Go’. At the end of the hose, narrower than that of a vacuum cleaner, presumably to help maintain the pressure (but you should see the *length*, girls…), is a lightweight steam pistol easily held in one hand. Pointing it closely at the nearest door-handle, I took aim, fired and found myself enveloped in a cloud of rapidly cooling steam. Turning the output down, I tried again. Considered reasonably clean before, the door-handle seemed to positively glow now, but something else was happening too. The paint surrounding it had began to bubble and melt (it later turned out to be a small amount of adhesive around the handle, and not the paint at all) Oops. Was I going to let this put me off? Not a chance. The dining table and chairs were blitzed, as were the wall units and TV and video, etc. Unless you’re in a hurry to meet your maker ‘death row’ fashion, electrical items are best cleaned with this by spraying onto the cloth first and then wiping over – it seems to work just as well. Without the slight stickiness left by furniture polish (which, given the choice, I would not now go back to using), it proved to be longer before the dust and dirt was attracted back again. Twenty minutes later, with the lounge sparkling, paintwork and all, I spotted the gerbil eyeing me suspiciously. I eyed him back. Hmm… Fear not, gentle reader, I was not about to steam-clean a gerbil here. He was deposited in the kitchen sink with a lump of cheese to keep him busy while all the awkward to reach horizontal bars of his cage that he idles away the happy hours dumping on were zapped in minutes with the cleaner. This was the o
        nly thing I usually bought Milton fluid for, preferring to use stronger stuff elsewhere, so I’d just made *another* cut in the household chemical budget – we wouldn’t be needing *that* stuff any more either. But what about my kitchen sink? It had just had a gerbil in it! Zap! (The sink, not the gerbil…) The results (on stainless steel at least) easily rivalled those obtained by ‘It’s-Jif-not-Cif’ and other cream cleaners, something else I wouldn’t be buying again. By that time I had gotten completely trigger-happy. The kitchen floor got the treatment (no more buying a new mop-head three times a year, either) as well as the glazed back door (be gone, squirty window-cleany stuff!), and within a very short space of time I’d done the entire kitchen to the point where you could probably carry out surgery on the worktops without risk of infection. I’ve since discovered that a blast of steam at 120 degrees makes much lighter work of defrosting the freezer too. Throughout the house, bins were blitzed, beds de-bugged, and even my husband’s fearsome trainers lost most of their deadly potency. With regard to carpets and upholstery, I think the machine is probably better at *keeping* these things clean as opposed to *getting* them clean, but for spot cleaning t’is truly a wonderful thing, especially for those bits of Blu-Tak and ground-in chewing gum that kids have a touching habit of offering refuge to in the bedroom carpets. (Cake tip: If you don’t have a steam cleaner, WD40 does an ace job of getting rid of chewing gum and Blu-Tak from carpets and clothing – you’d never know it had even been there) I’m a bit precious about my bath and will probably never give up my Kleeneze ‘Astonish’ habit, but I found its residue was rinsed away far more quickly and effectively under the pressure of the steam cleaner. Likewise the toilet - always g
        oing to get a squirt of Domestos down the pan every night, an additional blast with the steam cleaner every morning now only adds a minute or so onto the time it takes to keep the place clean, and whatever lurked behind the jumble of inaccessible pipes at the back of it lurks there no longer. The big fluffy bath mat gets cleaned every day now instead of being washed twice a week as it was before – an expensive way of doing things since it couldn’t go in with anything else and so left a lot of space doing nothing in the machine. All this so far has been achieved with just the aforementioned bar towels and itchy trigger finger, but the capabilities of the steam cleaner add up to still more with the accompanying accessories – two long extension tubes (even *more* length, girls!), various brushes and cloths and a couple of window squeegees. Optional attachments include a steam iron and a wallpaper stripper among other things, but I think there’s a danger you might end up needing the steam cleaner surgically removed from the end of your arm (on your clinically clean kitchen worktop if necessary!), if you get *too* carried away… The only downside is a small one, this being that you have to wait for the machine to cool and the pressure to drop inside the tank before you can release the safety cap to refill it when it’s empty. It probably only takes about twenty minutes, but if you don’t like being put off your stroke midway through your performance, it’s best to start out with your reserves at full capacity behind your hose rather than risk disappointment. My steam cleaner has been in use every day since I got it in mid-December, and I wouldn’t want to be without it now. So much part of the furniture has it become that even the kids have stopped taking the Proverbial, or at least the “Don’t stand still too long in here or our Mum’ll ‘steam’ you!” cracks to t
        heir mates have stopped (but should they make a comeback, my finger’s on the trigger…). Depending on which way the wind is blowing with Basil the faulty hoover, my housework is usually done by the time they head off for school on a morning, leaving time for other things. Like laundry. And cooking. *Sigh…* http://www.polti-ltd.co.uk/vap2001r.htm

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          28.09.2001 06:32
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          Polti are an Italian manufacturer that specialises in top of the range steam cleaners, vacuum cleaners and irons. Their main selling point in regard to their steam cleaners is that they enable you to use ordinary tap water, in the form of high-pressure steam, to perform a variety of household cleaning jobs, without the use of chemicals and detergents. From my own experience and from consumer reviews, including a number on Dooyoo, I have come to the conclusion that Polti products do perform to the high standard requires by a £200-£400 price tag. That is, with the exception of the 2001R. Having seen a Polti demonstration on 'TV Shop' (using the well-known red 2400 model) I was convinced of the benefits of owning a steam cleaner and scoured the Internet for the best price. Prices for the 2400 range from £300 to just under £400, but I also found the new 2001R with a free Polti Iron on sale from 'freeNet' (www.freenet.ltd.uk) for £292, including delivery. As we needed a new Iron (the Polti Irons attach to the main steam unit to give a continuous supply of steam) I thought that this was too good to miss and ordered one. It arrived the next day, via omega securicor and performed as we had expected. Over the next few days we cleaned down the kitchen, bathroom, blasted out spiders from behind the radiators, removed some stains from the carpet and had begun to steam clean the three-piece suite. We then tried the iron, with no problems; my wife loved it and said she had done her ironing in half the time. The Polti 2001R has two switches, one for the power and one to turn the accessory output on and off i.e. when you change over from the cleaning attachment to the iron and vice versa. It was when I was doing this that I noticed the accessory switch did not always engage and sometimes took four or five presses to do so. Thinking there must be perhaps a reasonable explanation I rang the Polti helpline. To my surp
          rise Polti said straight away they would exchange it for a new one via 'City link' which they did the next day as a straight swap. As it was a new model, direct from the manufacturer, I thought there would be no problem, how wrong could I be. In all I have now been the proud owner of three Polti 2001r's the original one and two from Polti all with the same switch fault. Polti even offered to send me another replacement, but only the same model and suggested I perhaps contact ?freeNet? to resolve the matter. This is exactly what I did and by paying an extra £37 I have upgraded to the Polti 2400, which included an iron at half price. If you decide you need a steam cleaner get a Polti, they are the best, but if you are going to spend £300 + pay a bit extra and get their best and most popular model the 2400, don't waste your time or money on the 2001R.

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        • Product Details

          Short name: Polti 2001R