Welcome! Log in or Register

Macromedia Dreamweaver MX

  • image
£11.12 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
6 Reviews
  • Reliability
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    6 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      29.08.2008 14:22
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • Reliability

      Disadvantages

      Brilliant piece of software a must have!

      I dont know how i used to manage without Dreamweaver, its a fantastic programme and a must have for anyone who wants to design a professional looking site.

      If you've no experience in HTMl this is also the best way forward with its WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get) interface. The ability to modify CSS is also fantastic and vwry useful for anyone with a bit of experience in this field.

      The layout may look a little daunting at first to the user, but after hiding a few windows which you will probably never use, it all looks a bit better. The menu's are easy to use and you shouldnt take too much time before you have a decent looking site (providing you can create half decent graphics in something like Photoshop first).

      Overall i would say this is the best by a long way and any aspiring web designer should start here!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      27.08.2008 21:09
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • Reliability

      Disadvantages

      A quality product with advanced features but easy to use!

      Need to design a website? Look no further than dreamweaver!
      At the top of its market dreamweaver is the best web design program out there. Making it easy for beginners to design using the WYSIWYG editor but also allowing experienced users to edit the HTML code this makes the ultimate package (used by many pros).
      Dreamweaver allows confident web designers to edit CSS in raw code but also allows amateurs to edit it simply by selecting options! It truely is that easy!
      If you dont know HTML have no fear simply insert an image as you would in MS Word and have the program compile the HTML for you!

      One downside is all this technology costs a lot of money, you can expect to spend a couple of hundred pounds on Dreamweaver MX!

      Dreamweaver is a quality product which makes web design easy for adults and even children - Outstanding Product!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      09.03.2007 21:01

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A hard hitter with bags of functionality and endless possibility.

      This is one of the TITANS of Web Site Design programmes, competing only with HOT METAL PRO and a select couple of others.
      Alas, when something can do just about anything, it takes a whole lot to get it to do the slightest thing.
      This is not a software package to which you will take like the proverbial duck to water.
      At first, it will be like sitting in the cockpit of a trans-Atlantic airliner......
      Once you have learned the basics, however, you will loose much sleep on successive nights as you are lured to test things out and experiment.
      Without a doubt, if you want to make something significant and powerful, this is the package for you.
      Tell people you user Macromedia Dreamweaver and you'll not get sand kicked in your face at the beach!
      If you are looking for graphics software to complement Dreamweaver, look no further than XARA WEBSTYLE, which has special integration for Dreamweaver and vice versa. Xara Webstyle generates all sort of web icons and menu very quickly with a powerful library of images and a shop window of images to buy from other people.
      If you want a full graphics package for editing images then either SERIF PHOTOPLUS or CORAL PAINTSHOP PRO. Both of these pack a solid punch in terms of functionality and powerful tools - but PaintShop has to win on ease of use. Then again - if you've learned to fly Dreamweaver you'll be up for any challenge!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      24.12.2003 06:04
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      4 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Dreamweaver MX 2004 is the sixth version of Macromedia's well respected web design suite. The name suggests little more than an updated version of last year's Dreamweaver MX, but this version offers plenty of improvements, with a revamped user interface plus added and updated features such as cross-browser code validation, integrated image editing, secure FTP and improved support for cascading style sheets (CSS), allowing layout and formatting to be applied easily across a website. The interface is similar enough to its predecessor for existing users to feel immediately at home, with the docking side panels present and correct. Now, however, there's a more stylish blue look. The main portion of the screen containing the design and code windows benefits from a tabbed interface, allowing you to flick easily between different HTML pages, HTML and CSS, or the various pages of code needed when working with server-side includes (SSIs). As well as these cosmetic and structural updates, the Dreamweaver interface has been improved in line with the main focus of this new version: the improved CSS support. Working extensively with CSS in previous versions could be something of a struggle. However, with an increasing number of designers turning to stylesheets for page layout as much as formatting, Macromedia has revamped its support for the standard in MX 2004. This version caters both for users who want to work with existing stylesheets or code by hand and for those who want a more automated experience. For those who don't want to enter code manually, the design view presents a WYSIWYG picture of the page being edited. This has been much improved, and now renders most stylesheet information well - it's at least as accurate as Internet Explorer 6. Stylesheets can be created without leaving the HTML document and attached without having to go to the code. A neat New Style dialog box allows formatting and positioning information to
      be applied to tags or classes. Dreamweaver MX 2004 even allows layouts to be designed using standards-friendly CSS positioning without hand coding. The user has only to define the necessary IDs or classes using the new Style Definition dialog box, enter the relevant positioning information and then select that class or ID when adding a new DIV to their page. Another useful new tool for anyone using CSS is the Relevant CSS tab, which has been added to the tag inspector. This new window allows the author to see quickly and easily which CSS styles apply to any selected object, including those that have been overridden. Users who want to hand-edit their CSS will find MX 2004 easy to work with. Editing, attaching and managing stylesheets is simple, and the code hints available when editing CSS speed up the process considerably. Authors concerned with standards compatibility and accessibility will be pleased to find that it's now easy to work with XHTML documents in Dreamweaver - a feature still missing from Microsoft's FrontPage. Dreamweaver MX 2004 isn't just a CSS upgrade. There are important new features, such as the cross-browser validation system. This new tool allows you to set the browsers your site is targeted at from a comprehensive list, including Safari and Opera alongside more popular clients, after which you can check your HTML and CSS for possible compatibility issues with one click. A whole site can be checked at once, and a good amount of information is provided for any errors found. This can be displayed in the results pane or an HTML report can be created. Helpfully, clicking on a browser compatibility problem in the results pane immediately jumps to the relevant code. Flipping between an HTML editor and a graphics program is a task well known to web designers, but Dreamweaver MX 2004 attempts to streamline the process. Image cropping, contrast and sharpening can now be completed without having to leave
      the design view. This is no substitute for a separate image-editing application, but it's a useful tool, particularly when dropping photos on to a page. Dreamweaver's internal FTP client has also been updated, with added support for Secure FTP. A large number of small improvements have also been made for users who want to work directly with HTML code, including a new right-click context menu. This offers useful functions such as indenting/outdenting and converting tags to upper and lower case. Improvements have also been made to the all-important Find and Replace dialog, which now offers the ability to save searches and can be navigated entirely using the keyboard. Support for building web applications is as good as ever, with code hints provided for PHP, JSP, Coldfusion and ASP.NET as well as (X)HTML and CSS. Overall, Dreamweaver MX 2004 is an impressive new version, which manages to address the key weaknesses of its predecessor while introducing plenty of smaller new features. Whether users of Dreamweaver MX should consider upgrading depends on whether they use CSS. Anyone using stylesheets will find the new version invaluable, but others might not find the cross-browser validation and other new tools worth the £160 upgrade price. If you're looking to buy for the first time, however, Dreamweaver MX 2004 remains the best web design package around.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        05.07.2003 11:43
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Well this is the program I use to write webpages and edit others. The feature I find most useful is copying and pasting html then switching to the actualisation of the site to move bits and pieces, reshape and recolour the bits. Not being an expert in writing html, I find it much easier to rip the codes from sites I like then edit them as I choose and Dreamweaver makes that a snap. At present, it's $995.00 Australian to buy, but who actually buys software these days? It writes its own java codes for rollover images, buttons, forms and all the rest so even if you have no idea what you're doing, as long as you can make your elements the size and colour you want, Dreamweaver will take care of the rest of the details for you. When it come to publishing the site, you can switch back to the html code with one click then copy and paste it to your server or save it to a word file and use your ftp client to upload the complete page. There is a command box at the bottom which gives you options for tag behaviours - such as "onclick" or "goto" or whatever you happen to be playing around with - which of course means Dreamweaver will write the appropriate html code to suit the behaviour you specify. There are heaps of template designs to choose from if you can't make your own mind what sort of design you want, and you can modify all aspects of those as well. That means you can pick and choose what page elements you want to keep from a template and what elements you would rather do without. Dreamweaver will handle all graphics and flash components as well. If pie charts with hidden details or hyperlinks are your thing, Dreamweaver makes it easy. It will also create php, asp, jsp and coldfusion elements.. truly, as far as internet applications are concerned, there is nothing it can't do. It has a comprehensive help section which gives detailed instructions on how to
        use the features in the program, however the explanations are a bit mind-boggling if you're not au fait with the terminology. I prefer to muck around with it and use <ctrl>+Z to undo my mistakes. I've used Frontpage and some other horrible program to write webpages. Dreamweaver leaves them for dead.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          30.07.2002 16:33
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          8 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Whilst my mother announced to me on the phone that she'd just gone and bought an MX-5, I had to content myself with the purchase of Dreamweaver MX - the successor to Dreamweaver 4, a product which I had used since its launch in late 2000, having grown-up with Dreamweaver - I remember using Dreamweaver 1.2 at the company I worked for in Brussels way way back... The entire MX range is effectively version six, with the Flash player being called Flash 6 player (it is a plug-in rather than a fully fledged software package). Following hot on the heels of Macromedia's Flash MX release, which marked the start of the whole new MX concept from Macromedia (to all intents and purposes it sounds suspiciously like their answer to XP - although admittedly they are not going to be launching an Office package or an Operating System! I always view new versions of software with an air of suspicion, as I know that certain developers release new editions more often than others release bug fixes and patches (and the new versions are really little more than that in actual fact...). However that is not the case with Dreamweaver MX, which has a new look (something tells me that the on-going legal rumblings with Adobe might have necessitated that to a certain degree) and a lot of new features. Previously there had been Dreamweaver and Dreamweaver Ultradev, with the latter containing the functions that were used to create web applications, although it has now been including in Dreamweaver MX so effectively you get DW and DW Ultradev for your money, and there is an increasing likelihood that Homesite, another Macromedia product will also disappear from the Macromedia product palette. As a result Dreamweaver MX is the one for pro webdesigners - as it offers the full spectrum of web development possibilities, from hand-coding (yes, some developers still prefer to handcode!), through graphic design and various database connections. With a tendency towards ASP.
          NET, PHP, Cold Fusion and JSP coding Dreamweaver MX now incorporates automatic generation of code in these respective languages, as well as continued support for DHTML (and they've included the various behaviours that are available in the current version 6 browsers - huzzah!), so that the results will work in all major browsers (that's one headache I would hate to have if I were a pro webdesigner...). As ever Dreamweaver steals a march over Frontpage in that it does not use proprietary HTML tags (which ultimately do little more than slow down the loading times for the pages) and also doesn't alter existing HTML that is parsed through it (Frontpage enjoys this little trick... grrrrr....!) Having completed the installation process, which was as ever a simple and straightforward process, I fired up DW MX for the first time, although it was not quite like the feeling of ripping open my Christmas presents, as I had downloaded the beta version from Macromedia's site to have a little look at before this one popped through the letterbox. As I had previously mentioned, the product had a new look - with the traditional floating palettes, which did tend to clutter the screen up a lot and infuriated by the fact that they were not dockable with one another, having been replaced by the integrated palettes, with everything selectable from the right hand side and beneath the work area, where the properties palette is kept. These palettes can be maximised and minimised as necessary, which I would have to recommend as there is a tendency for them to take up a large amount of the screen area, which means that if you are wanting to design a site that is optically optimized for a screen resolution of 1024 x 768 then you would be well advised to have your screen resolution set to 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution otherwise you'll find yourself having to scroll around a lot. Macromedia have also left in the "classic" look of previous incarnatio
          ns to help those who preferred the old layout, although I headed over to the new layout straight away. I had mentioned earlier that I wondered if HomeSite was going to be continued, and I suppose I ought to elucidate further as to what had caused me to doubt whether it would. In Dreamweaver MX's coding view (now replete with line numbers - very useful if you use a browser to preview it and need to do a spot of debugging - unless like me your sites come out as they should first time out ;o) ) and the coder's view is distinctly similar to that which users of homesite would remember (e.g. file explorer on the left-hand-side etc.). Other Homesite features to have been incorporated are snippets, colouring of syntax, code formatting and tag editing. As with previous versions there are a host of extensions available for DW6 - which can be downloaded and managed using the in-built extension manager, with many existing add-ins being forward compatible - or MX being backward compatibility depending on how you look at it! So what else is new??? Whilst Dreamweaver will never go as far as providing you with pre-designed websites from templates à la Frontpage, it has introduced a new feature whereby you can create pages based on pre-defined page layouts, although rather than offering a complete graphical page, they offer the basic elements you need, although they have fortunately steered clear of the Frontpage navigation systems. Despite having said that Dreamweaver is good in that it doesn't insert its own HTML like Frontpage does, that doesn't mean that it is still compliant to W3C standards, and until now there has not been an in-built validator with Dreamweaver, although there is now. To use the validator, use the edit menu click on preferences and then click on validator and choose what you want to valid it with. Accordingly it is now possible to enforce ALT tags and document types appear in the header - an import
          ant part of compliance, although it is still possible to not stick pages through the validator. Dreamweaver 4 could clean up HTML, especially of the Word and Frontpage flavours, making it possible to streamline nested font tags (I tended to avoid formatting the fonts until the page was complete, and then had a command (formed using the history) that would set the entire page to a particular font (usually Arial) - something that can also be done easily in MX using the history pane and selecting what commands you want included - very useful if you use server side includes a lot for server parsed HTML (e.g. as is the case on Cricinfo - one of the sites I manage is at www.austria.cricket.org and contains an example of shtml with SSI headers and footers). Dreamweaver MX has improved support with the hitherto unsupported (apart from thanks to a third party developer who wrote the command to do that) Word 2002 (from Office XP) and Frontpage 2002 (ditto) being supported - just wait for Microsoft to release a new issue of either to bugger it all up again. For another use of the commands menus, I know that a lot of people also publish their Ciao and Dooyoo ops on their own sites ? just in case both of Ciao and Dooyoo go tits up and so that people can still read their pearls of consumer wisdom. You could use the commands menu to tidy up the formatting (e.g. apply justification, change the font) and add a footnote e.g. "this op originally was written for uk.ciao.com or dooyoo.co.uk ..." (you get the idea!) with your little copyright message! Of course no review is complete without an analysis of whether the purchase represents money well spent. I would have to say that nice though the software is to have, I can't imagine too many home users having the money to splash out on this one - if you want to get a copy of an earlier edition, keep your eyes peeled for copies going begging on a magazine cover disk. Alternatively there are unreliab
          le warez products - although who knows what nasty payloads they might also contain and of course the support is non-existent for pirate copies. I paid ?527.24 for my copy (German) from an online store here in Austria (approx £330) which was a tiny bit cheaper than the prices I have seen for the UK and including P&P. At the moment it is £351.02 from dabs.com, although if you want to go the whole MX hog - I will eventually I expect - you can get it as part of the Studio MX Collection (Flash, Freehand, Fireworks and Dreamweaver MX versions) for £692.07 incl. VAT. Of course the other products in the range compliment Dreamweaver MX, and by having only purchased Dreamweaver MX to date I have not unlocked the full potential of MX - but hopefully will do soon, with Fireworks MX and Flash MX being part of an armoury for any webdesigner.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
        • Product Details

          The world's best way to create professional websites is now the easiest way to build powerful Internet applications. For the first time, you can work in a single environment to quickly create, build, and manage websites and Internet applications. Get visual layout tools. Experience rapid web application development. Utilize extensive code-editing support. It's all in one complete, integrated solution - Macromedia Dreamweaver MX.

          Now every member of your development team - designers, developers, and programmers - can work in a single integrated environment to create, build, and manage websites and Internet applications. Macromedia Dreamweaver MX combines its renowned visual layout tools with the rapid web application development features of Dreamweaver UltraDev and the extensive code-editing support of Macromedia HomeSite. So the world's best way to create professional websites is now the easiest way to build powerful Internet applications.