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Hardys Wines

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Made from three of Australia's top red varietals (Shiraz, Merlot and Cabernet) and only in Australia would you find these three varieties together, this is a wine which was produced from grapes carefully chosen for their utmost quality. Fermented at a higher temperature than the white wine in the range, the wine was aged in oak barrels to give it intense varietal fruit characters with complex oak flavours. It will develop appreciably in your cellar for up to five years after being bought.

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    9 Reviews
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      03.04.2010 11:51
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      Couldn't drink this; It's a disappointment from a usually reliable brand

      I have always enjoyed red wine and for many years I could drink anything from Hungarian Bulls Blood to a quality Fitou. It simply didn't matter. If the truth be known I suppose I didn't care much as long as it was red wine and a quality red was probably wasted on me anyway.

      However, as the years have gone by I have realised that very rough red wine gives me a headache and a stomach ache. By 'rough' I don't mean cheap because some very cheap wines can be excellent to drink.

      For a long time I was of the opinion that wine had to be French and red to be drinkable and a usually went for a Fitou.

      Then I discovered Hardy's Stamp which is distinctive as it has a big Australian stamp on the label. It's smooth, low in tannin and doesn't have too many sulphites which is what gives you a headache if you are susceptible to it. Hardy's does have an excellent name and I have always considered the brand to be reliable. I tried several Hardy's varieties and all were quite drinkable.

      At least that was the case until I bought Hardy's Voyage Classic Red from Asda. This was on offer at three bottles for ten pounds and I had no worries about it because it from a producer that I knew.

      As it happened, I found it undrinkable. This is a classic red from South Eastern Australia which contains sulphites and has a very strong tannin taste. The label says that it is vibrant and medium bodied with red and black berry fruit flavours and a long finish. To me it was heavy with a kind of metal taste and a heavy aroma of fermented fruit. Half a glass gave me a huge headache and I couldn't keep my eyes open. The rest of the bottle went down the drain and probably made a good job of cleaning it.

      The other two bottles were passed on as gifts. Someone else might like this wine, or perhaps they too will clean the drain with it.

      The point here is that I had confidence in the Hardy's brand when it came to selecting a red wine but now I am wary of trying other wines from their range except the Hardy's Stamp. Producing this cheap wine for Asda cartainly damaged their brand name in my eyes and I do wonder how many other people thought the same.

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        22.02.2010 13:43
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        If you love red wine then try this, a fabulous wine for all tastes.

        I have always been a red wine drinker, but my partner has only just been intorduced to this fabulous beverage. I thought that to start with i should try him with a red that went well with shephards pie. I chose a shiraz as i like to add this to the mince as well.

        I also chose hardys as it was a selection of wines that i use to drink before moving to spain, now that i am back i am back to drinking my fravorite brands again. Isnt it strange that you always go back to something you are use to after a period of time where you have tried plenty of other brands.

        Hardys Shiraz is made in south eastern australia with rich plum and ripe blackberry fruit, you can see this in the wonderfull deep purple of the drink itself. It smells of dark rich forest fruits almost like a blackberry crumble, with a peppery undertone.

        You can serve it with a variety of meat dishes that are full in flavour, like a spagetti bolgnaise or a shephards pie. I find that putting a little in with the mince can inhance the flavours of the meal. It is also a great wine to serve with steak, and because of the peppery undertone of this wine it goes great with pepper sauce.

        At £5.85 for a 750ml bottle this is not the cheapest wine on the market but it is defenatly one of the best.

        Anyway back to my partner, im glad to say that he has been converted to red wine due to trying this particular wine. He still has a long way to go till he can say that he is a red wine drinker but i must say it is great being able to order a full bottle of red wine for the 2 of us when we are out and being able to enjoy red wine at home together.

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        09.06.2009 21:26
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        A great selection of wines, that won't break the bank.

        I think that it has long since been a mistake of modern society to think that something good has to be extraordinarily expensive. Perhaps this ludirous notion was born into our previous years of excess, but thanks to the currant economic climate we have had to curb this thought, and settle for less.

        The truth of the matter, is that you never have to settle. Good quality can be found, without breaking the bank. The credit crunch need not halt your thirst for the finer things in life. Wine, is one of the few passions in my life. And it is true to say that you will always get 'so called' experts saying that a truly great wine will cost an arm and a leg. My best advice to you, is to not listen to them as nothing could be further from the truth.

        to give an example, I remember back to my student days. We lived with a few French guys, and we all became quite friendly. Well, it turned out that his father owned a vineyard, and produced high quality, and very expensive wines. Well, Romain, and Guillome decided to cook a traditional French meal for us, and Romain supplied then red wine to go with the duck that they had prepared for us. We ate, and drank. The wine was undoubtably well paired with the duck. It was a good, hearty red. Full bodied, but in my opinion it was nothing 'special'. When he told me that the bottle we had just drank between us would cost £400, I nearly choked.

        You see, a wine is not set in stone. There is no one way to create something that everyone will enjoy. Rather, the wine chooses you. The wine I spoke of above, was very expensive, but really rather dull. It did not suit me, though I am sure it would suit others. I, however, can safely say that I have enjoyed bottles of wine that cost under £4 more, than the botltle that cost £400. You can safely assume, therefore that a bottle costing £400, is not 100 times better than the one costing £4

        So, where am I going with all this? Let's get on to hardy's. They have all the proof you will ever need to show you that what is cheap, can also be good. Hardy's have been in this game for 150 years. They are based in Australia, and have produced some really good wines for comparitavely little money. Quality, it seems, is not always compromised for value.

        The Australian climate ripens the fruit further, and tends to make them quite strong due to the higher sugar content. But these guys are experienced enough to deliver it to you in a very subtle way. Accross the board, the wines they produce are highly drinkable, and never get too expensive. On of the most popular of their labels, would be the Hardy's stamp range. There are some top quality wines in their, no matter what you favourite grape may be. My own personal favourite of the stamps, would be the semmilon chardonnay, which combines strength, zesty tones, and the chardonny's creaminess, that so often isn't delivered from other winemakers

        However, for a real connaiseur I think the best label they own, and ironically one of the cheapest is the varietal range, or VR. These are great for wine virgins, and wine veterans alike. They are uncomplicated (some would say this makes them less interesting, but I disagree.), And give you only the varietal characteristics of the grape you are sampling. Indeed, if you want to learn to recognise the grapes for their own characteristics, then try these. They will help you to get to grips with the notes, and flavours of each grape.

        Of the VR's, the best by far is the chardonnay. Great melony flavours, verging on the peachy. Dry to the taste, but with enough ummph to keep it interesting. It is great with pasta, chicken or lightly grilled meats.

        Although they do some great little reds as well, I think that Hardy's main talent is what they can do with white wines. It seems, that the Australians are becomeing as successful with white wine, as the californians are with rose. And with prices starting from as little as £3.99 a bottle, you can try these safe in the knowledge that the credit crunch won't crunch you!

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          31.01.2008 21:20

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          Hardys sweet red It's new It's cabernet Sauvignon and it is absolutely the best red you can buy for four pounds fifty,Iceland have it on offer ,3 for ten pounds,try it if you like red , It's full bodied and meaty but without the edge and a little on the dessert side you'll love it.

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          11.09.2003 04:10
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          Well here we go on red wine number 2. You may have read my first opinion on red wine - I did say I would attempt the list. But at this rate it may take me until the day I die!!!! This fruity little number was bought on our holiday in Wales this summer. I am a red wine drinker - but after baby number 2 just can't seem to knock it back as I used to be able to, (proving it's not just your figure and your bank balance that kids ruin!). I bought my bottle of Hardys from Safeways (not much choice in holidays ville South Wales). It cost me about £3.75 - I remember that it was reduced (I love those special offers - I fall for them EVERY time). I expected quite a lot from this wine as it was reduced price. The sophisticated bottle was the thing that won me over - that and the rule that I try and pay around the £4-5 mark for wine since I left my student days (with lack of taste buds) behind about 20yrs ago! Again I was the only one drinking the wine so my bottles have to not only be palatable but be able to stand the test of time - i.e stood on the kitchen cupboard for a few days until it's finished. Big mistake number one - I opened this wine and poured a glass straight away - DON'T try this at home with Hardy's. It became obvious it is a red wine that like to breath. The first glass was a complete disappointment and tasted sour like vinegar. However, I do tend to perserver with my wines and came back for a second glass about 3 hours later (after the kids were in bed). This was a complete surprise as it tasted wonderfully fruity by then. It has a rather thick quality, making it feel like it's worth those extra few pennies. It can be drunk alone, but acompanies most meal ideas! In self catering holiday cottage you can imagine the meals it had to accompany - fish and chips being one of them! I did manage to drink the whole bottle in less than 3 days - well I was on holiday and leting my ha
          ir down somewhat. Hardy's is not an outstanding wine - but is drinkable and benefits from looking posh on your kitchen worktop. I would buy it again - maybe not because it had an unforgetable flavour, but because it has a catchy name.

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            09.04.2002 20:57
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            I don’t consider myself to be a wine buff or anything like that, I just know what I like!! In my opinion this is a really good wine for all occasions!! It has a good flavour but it’s not to heavy so you can drink it with a meal with out the wine filling you up too much-leaving plenty of room for dessert! Good value for money at just over a fiver! Also makes a good present for any one!! The only bad thing I can think to say about it is that it stained my white shirt very badly and drink too much and you will end up with a cracking hang over but as does all red wine LOL!!

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              18.03.2002 14:25
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              Although I'm not quite as big a wino as Jilly Goolden or Sheridan or Punt & Dennis' "World of Wine" sketches, I know what I like and this is it... I tend to consume a fair amount of Hardy?s Stamps of Australia wine here in Austria, as it is a lot more affordable in Austria than Britain. Over here we pay EUR 5 a bottle, i.e. just over £3 for a 75cl bottle, whereas in Britain the standard bottle price is £4.99 although from memory, it is often reduced in Waitrose to £3.74 a bottle, a price that can also be got if you buy it by the case (6 bottles) from tesco.co.uk - another of my saving ruses! As Jane MacQuitty wrote in her weekly column in The Times in December, when talking about a Hardy's white and this red wine, "...the red bursts with rich, spicy berry fruit. Both taste more expensive than they are." So it can?t be bad for her to recommend it. To me it is appealing as it is a bottle of wine that is very drinkable straightaway, and the manufacturers do say that it can be kept for up to a year, but recommend it being drank within that time, and that it doesn?t require cellaring, although to be honest, how many people actual cellar their wines ;-) This is actually one of the explicit recommendations of the company?s official website (www.hardys.com.au) The bottle has unostentatious graphics on it, although as with champagne, where any sound of a cork popping detracts from the quality of the champagne, a showy label is sometimes used to cover a lacklustre wine. The wine comes from South Australia, from the Barosa Valley (located Northeast of Adelaide), which it the home to a lot of good red wines, of which Stamps of Australia Shiraz-Cabernet is just one example. Shiraz-Cabernet is a blend of the Shiraz grape and the Cabernet grape, and due to the fact that it a mixture of two types of grape, this keeps the price down, with a "cuvée" bottle of Shiraz or Cabernet Sauvignon likely to be considerably more expensive. The effect ofth
              e blend of grapes is noticeable too in that the Shiraz is a full-flavoured grape, whereas the Cabernet is a thinner wine, and therefore this wine is fairly light and a good compromise. It is also a medium dry (as opposed to medium sweet!) red wine, which makes it a good complement for a main course, but is certainly very drinkable just on its own. I have seen a wide range of suggestions for the consumption of this wine with food, with Tesco claiming it is ideal for consumption with spicy sausages, red meat, pasta and, wait for it, pizza! So next time you grab a pizza perhaps this might be a wine to look out for. I often cook up a large Bolognese, and find that a dash of red wine, as well as giving me something to drink in the cooking process, can liven up the dish slightly, although this is probably too good to use as a cooking wine! Of course for those people who class £4 as the threshold between cheap and expensive wines, this will be an expensive wine, but when you consider that a French Mouton Cadet will often weigh in around £8 a bottle, this is certainly a definite bargain.

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                24.01.2002 05:36

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                Cabernet Sauvignon 99 (don't get the 2000) is great on it's own, the measure of a good red. Cheers. - Advantages: Price, Food compatibility, Bottle (it's lovely - Disadvantages: Tesco's run out!

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                11.09.2001 01:54
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                There are several things in the world that make me happy, content and warm inside, and other than my girlfirend, there is only one thing that gives me that fuzzy feeling on top of all of the above - a decent glass of red wine. I started drinking red wine about two years ago, and at that stage would drink pretty much anything that came in a bottle and was red in colour. It's only as time's gone on and I've drunk and brought many varieties that I have started to appreciate the difference between a good drinkable wine and a great one. There is so much snobbery that goes with wine drinking, especially red, it's quite ridiculous. The thing is, you can never tell what's good and what's not till you've tried it. I've had a bottle of red in a restaurant that cost us £380.00 (I didn't pay for it I'd like to point out.) And I've had a bottle of plonk at £2.99. So was it worth it's £377.01 more? Quite frankly - No. IT wasn't to my taste at all. Very light, slight acidic, and above all £380.00. Hardy's Cabernet/Shiraz/Merlot sells for about £6.49 in Tesco, though they kindly had it at half price recently - YAY!!! £3.25 a bottle. This wine is a mix of three of Australia's main grape varieties, each of which you can buy as a wine on there own or mixed with others - Merlot is widely grown in France and Italy and is used widely in some of the best wines (St Emilion and Pomeral), it is also experimented with by Calfornian wine makers. It has a very soft fruit taste and is a deep red in colour. Cabernet Sauvignon is the foundation of the red bordeaux. Caberbet on it's own is said to be quite harsh in flavour, and is often mixed with another grape like Merlot - this is the mix that makes Bordeaux. Shiraz is the Australian name for the French Syrah. (Shiraz is the name of the town, in what is now Iran, where the Syrah probably originates.) Shiraz on it's own
                is a lovely wine, and I recommend Hardy's Nottage Hill Shiraz - In my mind Australia make some of the nicest Shiraz or Cabernet mixes. It was pure pot luck that made me buy this wine in the first place. The bottle is black with a very stylish black and gold label about a third of the way up and the Hardy's shield at the base of the neck. It's a very good looking bottle of wine - and that's the reason I brought it - if I like the style of the label then I'll buy it. (NB - This doesn't always mean you'll get a nice wine - I've had some revolting stuff before in nice packaging!) The wine itself is very deep red in colour, looks like srong Ribena, very strong Ribena. The smell is very fruity, which I guess is the Merlot coming through, though the Shiraz too is very prominent in it's taste. It must be served at room temperature, it loses it's flavour even if it's a touch cold. I always let it breath for atleast 2 hours before serving, if you have a decanter then this will help. It's a very full-bodied red which is incredibly smooth and quaffable (I love that word!) This wine is a real treat. It is quite heavy and should really be served with meats like Lamb and Beef as recommended by Hardys, but if you're anything like me - you drink what you like when you want. There is too much snobbery around what wine goes best with what food, and although it can make a difference, you should really drink whatever you want. This is also a good wine to drink on it's own. This is one I pick up every time I go shopping to ensure that I have enough of it in, and if, like me, you are building a wine cellar of your own, this one is good for about five years. It can, however, be quite heavy and I avoid it during the summer (what we have of one!), as also red wines produce hystomines in your body and this can aggrevate your hayfever. It's certainly no
                t the cheapest of wines, you can get many that are nice for less - though being the wine snob I've become I never spend less than £5 on a bottle - there is a noticeable difference in taste and quality. However, if you're looking for something to impress at a dinner table, or as a gift to a red wine drinker, than this one comes heartily recommended. I brough a bottle for a dinner party with my girlfriends father - he who knows his wines - though he didn't know this one and when he guessed which was the French and which was the Australian - he picked the Hardy's as the French because of it's superior taste, aroma and depth. He was surprised he got it wrong (I guessed correctly - they were both decanted so there was no way of knowing - a little bit smug there!)and preferred the Australian at £6.49 to the French at over £30 that he'd provided. More money doesn't necessarily mean a better wine, but for an extra couple of quid Hardy's Cabernet/Shiraz/Merlot is well worth every penny.

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                Made from three of Australia's top red varietals (Shiraz, Merlot and Cabernet) and only in Australia would you find these three varieties together, this is a wine which was produced from grapes carefully chosen for their utmost quality. Fermented at a higher temperature than the white wine in the range, the wine was aged in oak barrels to give it intense varietal fruit characters with complex oak flavours. It will develop appreciably in your cellar for up to five years after being bought.